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Contextual Use and Communal Norms

The second chapter of Modal Empiricism ended with the idea that there is a tension between the contextual aspects of experimentation and the unifying power of scientific theories. Both are important for an empiricist who wishes to pay attention to experience while maintaining that science is directed towards a unified aim. The third chapter of my book presents an account of epistemic representation that resolves this tension, and constitutes the framework for the analyses of the rest of the book. ¶ Note that although I will mostly use scientific example, this account could apply to any kind of epistemic representation, for example, city maps.First Stage: Contextual Use ¶ The two-stage account of representation presented in this third chapter rests on a distinction between the contextual use of models in experimentation and their general status in the community of scientists. According to this account, contextual use entirely rests on the mental states of users: a concrete vehicle of representation (such as a map or equations written on paper) represents an object simply if the user assumes or pretends that she can learn about this object from the model. ¶ This stage depends on the purposes of the user, which can be captured by the notion of a context. A context specifies a particular target of representation, an object or a set of object, and a set of properties of interest, for example, a pendulum and the position of the pendulum along an axis assuming some finite degrees of precision. These... -

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The Argument Clinic

¶ This video excerpts the “Argument Clinic” provides a rich basis from which to introduce and explore the philosophical conception of argumentation. The post The Argument Clinic first appeared on Blog of the APA. -

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Contextual Use and Communal Norms The second chapter of Modal Empiricism ended with the idea that there is a tension between the contextual aspects of experimentation and the unifying power of scientific theories. Both are important for an empiricist who wishes to pay attention to experience while maintaining that science is directed towards a unified aim. The third chapter of my book presents an account of epistemic representation that resolves this tension, and constitutes the framework for the analyses of... Modal Empiricism -


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The Argument Clinic This video excerpts the “Argument Clinic” provides a rich basis from which to introduce and explore the philosophical conception of argumentation. The post The Argument Clinic first appeared on Blog of the APA. Blog of the APA -


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