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Enactive Imagination in Nature Aesthetics

James M. Dow is Associate Professor of Philosophy, Chair of Neuroscience, and Director of the Steel Center for the Study of Philosophy and Religion at Hendrix College, an ultrarunner, is obsessed with math rock and conceptual art, and lives on an eco-farm in Arkansas with Melissa Cowper-Smith, a Canadian mixed media artist. James has published articles on self-consciousness, social cognition, expert bodily action, awareness of agency, and joint action and is now working on a book applying insights from the philosophy of mind and action theory to debates concerning the aesthetic appreciation of nature. A post by James M. Dow.At the peak of the mountain the sky hurled a lightning bolt in my path. A rounded and gnarled knot of white light and white heat hung at the center of the bolt. The phenomenon connected me, the sky, and the ground. I tried to imagine myself projected into the light and walked forward into the space where the orb hovered. I found myself standing in awe in the empty place where the lightning had been. Such an experience raises questions about what types of imagination are involved in nature appreciation. When imagination is involved in aesthetic appreciation, is it the same mental state in the contexts of everyday aesthetics, art aesthetics, and nature aesthetics? When aesthetic experiences of nature are experienced as sublime, wild, or awesome, how should we think about the types of imagination involved? Such experiences seem to involve aesthetic properties such as powerfulness, grandness, spontaneity, and an... -

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Knowledge by Acquaintance vs. Description

[Revised entry by Ali Hasan and Richard Fumerton on June 12, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The terminology is most clearly associated with Bertrand Russell, but the distinction between knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge by description is arguably a critical component of classical or traditional versions of foundationalism. Let... -

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Knowledge by Acquaintance vs. Description [Revised entry by Ali Hasan and Richard Fumerton on June 12, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The terminology is most clearly associated with Bertrand Russell, but the distinction between knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge by description is arguably a critical component of classical or traditional versions of foundationalism. Let us say that one has inferential or nonfoundational knowledge that p when one's knowledge that p depends on one's knowledge of some other proposition(s) from... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


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Enactive Imagination in Nature Aesthetics James M. Dow is Associate Professor of Philosophy, Chair of Neuroscience, and Director of the Steel Center for the Study of Philosophy and Religion at Hendrix College, an ultrarunner, is obsessed with math rock and conceptual art, and lives on an eco-farm in Arkansas with Melissa Cowper-Smith, a Canadian mixed media artist. James has published articles on self-consciousness, social cognition, expert bodily action, awareness of agency, and joint action and is now working on a... The Junkyard -


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