Traditions

IFL2: Quotation conventions

A small matter. But an intro logic book needs to have a policy on whether mentioned formulae get enclosed in quotation marks. IFL1 took a sternly conservative line on this, leading to somewhat unsightly rashes of quotation marks. I originally was going to carry this over to IFL2; but I have belatedly decided on a much more relaxed policy, which will be followed in future draft chapters (a policy more in keeping, indeed, with usual mathematical practice, which is a major plus). I was uncomfortable about the amount of quotational clutter in IFL1, and I was spurred on in part by some blunt remarks about not fussing over quotation in §9.1.2 of David Makinson’s Sets, Logic and Maths for Computing. ¶ Having made the decision, I was interested to check back to see what other intro textbooks said about quotation, use and mention. There were some real surprises. For example: My namesake Nick Smith, in his (in many ways excellent) Logic: The Laws of Truth, doesn’t use quotation marks round formulae. Fair enough — but he never discusses this decision: in fact in his long book, he rather oddly doesn’t talk about quotation conventions, use and mention at all. Likewise, Barker-Plummer, Barwise and Etchemendy in Language, Proof and Logic also do not use quotation marks around formulae — and the only sort of quotes they actually mention in the book are scare quotes. Greg Restall’s Logic an Introduction doesn’t use quotes either, and again doesn’t discuss the issue. He perhaps... -

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On the claim of science. For Heidegger, “each supposition is always already grounded in a certain kind of acceptio. Only when the presence of something is accepted, can one have suppositions about it.” It is in this sense that Heidegger introduces the distinction between perceptible, ontic phenomena and the “imperceptible, that is the existing of something = ontological phenomena” that “always already and necessarily show themselves prior to all perceptible phenomena.” The point itself is key to “the contrast between the psychodynamic and the Daseinsanalytic view of the human being” and to that extent Heidegger reflects on what must be assumed, taken as given in order to articulate the Freudian schema whereby, as Heidegger explains, phenomena will be required to “take a backseat to suppositions”... -

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The Deed is Everything: Nietzsche on Will and Action

2019.06.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews ¶ Aaron Ridley, The Deed is Everything: Nietzsche on Will and Action, Oxford University Press, 2018, 207pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198825449. ¶ Reviewed by Peter Kail, Oxford University Aaron Ridley's book, modest in its aspirations, is both interesting... -

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Congratulations to Elisa Freschi and Jonardon Ganeri!

Elisa Freschi and Jonardon Ganeri have both accepted full-time positions at the University of Toronto, with Jonardon becoming the Bimal Matilal Distinguished Professor of Philosophy.  This is wonderful news for Indian philosophy in North America! ¶ From Leiter’s Blog: ¶ The University of Toronto has appointed two leading scholars of... -

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The Deed is Everything: Nietzsche on Will and Action 2019.06.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Aaron Ridley, The Deed is Everything: Nietzsche on Will and Action, Oxford University Press, 2018, 207pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198825449. Reviewed by Peter Kail, Oxford University Aaron Ridley's book, modest in its aspirations, is both interesting and frustrating. It is modest in that it argues that Nietzsche's philosophy can be read in an illuminating fashion through the lens of an 'expressivist' theory, 'without attributing... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


IFL2: Quotation conventions A small matter. But an intro logic book needs to have a policy on whether mentioned formulae get enclosed in quotation marks. IFL1 took a sternly conservative line on this, leading to somewhat unsightly rashes of quotation marks. I originally was going to carry this over to IFL2; but I have belatedly decided on a much more relaxed policy, which will be followed in future draft chapters (a policy more in keeping, indeed, with usual... Logic Matters -


Catherine Prueitt hired by the University of British Columbia Continuing the good news about Canada: Catherine Prueitt has accepted a position in at The University of British Columbia. Congratulations to her and to UBC! The Indian Philosophy Blog -


Congratulations to Elisa Freschi and Jonardon Ganeri! Elisa Freschi and Jonardon Ganeri have both accepted full-time positions at the University of Toronto, with Jonardon becoming the Bimal Matilal Distinguished Professor of Philosophy.  This is wonderful news for Indian philosophy in North America! From Leiter’s Blog: The University of Toronto has appointed two leading scholars of Indian philosophy, one senior and one junior. Jonardon Ganeri, currently Professor of Philosophy and Humanities at NYU Abu Dhabi, will become the Bimal Matilal Distinguished Professor of Philosophy... The Indian Philosophy Blog -


On the claim of science. For Heidegger, “each supposition is always already grounded in a certain kind of acceptio. Only when the presence of something is accepted, can one have suppositions about it.” It is in this sense that Heidegger introduces the distinction between perceptible, ontic phenomena and the “imperceptible, that is the existing of something = ontological phenomena” that “always already and necessarily show themselves prior to all perceptible phenomena.” The point itself is... Enowning -


The Limit of Responsibility: The Ethical Paradox of the Anthropocene by Agostino Cera In this post I will try to describe the ethical paradox emerging within the framework of the so-called Anthropocene: the ‘new aspirant ... Read more... Blog of the APA -


The Medical Model in Mental Health Today's post is by Dr Ahmed Samei Huda, a Consultant Psychiatrist working mostly in Early Intervention in Psychosis for Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust. He is introducing his book, The Medical Model in Mental Health: An Explanation and Evaluation (OUP, 2019). Huda is on Twitter (@SameiHuda), and blogs here.I am a clinician not an academic who became increasingly frustrated with the strawman depictions of psychiatry in the fraught conflicts between different professions and ideologies in... Imperfect Cognitions -


Taittiriya Upanishad II.i.1 (no.2 in series) The knower of Brahman attains the highest. Here is a verse uttering that very fact: Brahman is truth, knowledge and infinite. He who knows that Brahman existing in the intellect, lodged in the supreme space in the heart, enjoys, as identified with the all-knowing Brahman, all desirable things, simultaneously. When it is said that the knower of Brahman knows the highest, what is it that they know. When the answer is given it is parsed... Ombhurbhuva -


What’s an Analogy Analogous To? Supposing somebody didn’t know what an analogy was?  How could he find out? Could somebody explain it to him by an analogy?  Could somebody say “Look –an analogy bears the same relationship to the thing I am analogizing as does a dream of a river to our waking fear of death, an image in a mirror does to the thing mirrored, tears do the overburdened heart? How could that help?  Because it would seem to... Eric Linus Kaplan -


Toronto Hires Two in Indian Philosophy The University of Toronto Department of Philosophy has just hired two scholars who specialize in Indian philosophy: Jonardon Ganeri, currently professor of philosophy and humanities at New York University’s Abu Dhabi campus, and Elisa Freschi, currently at the Department of South Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies at the University of Vienna. art by Bharti Kher Professor Ganeri works on consciousness, the self, attention, the epistemology of inquiry, multiple-category ontologies, non-classical logics, the history of ideas in early modern South Asia, intellectual... Daily Nous -


Convention [Revised entry by Michael Rescorla on June 12, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The central philosophical task posed by conventions is to analyze what they are and how they differ from mere regularities of action and cognition. Subsidiary questions include: How do conventions arise? How are they sustained? How do we select between alternative conventions? Why should one conform to convention? What social good, if any, do conventions serve? How does convention relate to... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Knowledge by Acquaintance vs. Description [Revised entry by Ali Hasan and Richard Fumerton on June 12, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The terminology is most clearly associated with Bertrand Russell, but the distinction between knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge by description is arguably a critical component of classical or traditional versions of foundationalism. Let us say that one has inferential or nonfoundational knowledge that p when one's knowledge that p depends on one's knowledge of some other proposition(s) from... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


My Review of Michael Naas’s Plato and the Invention of Life is live at Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy. If you wish to read my longer, article-length version, that is here. And if you wish to hear Michael deliver part of this project at Memorial University of Canada two years ago, that audio is here. Philosophy in a Time of Error -


Smith on Smith Here is the opening paragraph to Vernon’s Foreward to Propriety and Prosperity. I would urge anyone interested in situated cognition to read his superb Rationality in Economics: Constructivist and Ecological Forms, amazingly an unknown work within situated circles, proponent or critic. Also worth a read is Vernon’s memoir. This book is a welcome addition to the resurgent scholarly… Man Without Qualities -


Probability in Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy [Revised entry by Rudolf Schuessler on June 12, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Probability-related terminology played an important role in medieval and Renaissance philosophy. Terms such as 'probable' (probabilis), 'credible' (credibilis) or 'truth-like' (verisimilis) were used to assess philosophical claims, qualify uncertain conclusions, gauge the force of arguments and temper academic disagreement. Beyond that, they had a significant impact on the regulation of legal proceedings, moral action and everyday life. The probability-related terminology... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Hypothesis: There Is Only One Graviton What do I know, I just read Nature Physics and quantum theory textbooks, but I so don't have a physics degree (unlike my grandfather).But here's an idea. And it does have the merit of extreme simplicity and not needing to invent shit we can't observe because they're too tiny or multidimensional.We can't find gravitons or make them work, not because of anything mysterious about dimensions, but because there's only one graviton. The singularity like "point"... Ecology Without Nature -


How Would Freud Explain Populism? One of the explanations for the rise of populist nationalist myths today goes back to the complicated dynamics between the individual and society, and between reason and fantasy. The thinker who might help us understand our current political storms is no other than Sigmund Freud.Freud is best known for his more controversial theories on sexuality. But we need not buy Freudian mechanics or his clinical theories. Enough of value remains without Oedipus.Freudian theory explores the... IAI.tv -


Augustine on capital punishment In his book On Augustine: The Two Cities, Alan Ryan says that Augustine’s “understanding of the purpose of punishment made the death penalty simply wrong” (p. 82).  That is a bit of an overstatement.  In The City of God, Augustine writes:However, there are some exceptions made by the divine authority to its own law, that men may not be put to death.  These exceptions are of two kinds, being justified either by a general law, or... Edward Feser -


Review of Reviews (The Courtier and the Heretic, Exultant, The Slow Professor, Cosmonaut Keep, Frankenstein: How a Monster Became an Icon) It's been awhile since I posted an old-fashioned review of reviews (as opposed to a "round up"), so here it goes!  In this one I'm reviewing three non-fiction books and two fiction books: The Courtier and the Heretic: Leibniz, Spinoza & the Fate of God in the Modern World by Matthew Stewart, Exultant by Stephen Baxter, The Slow Professor by Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber, Cosmonaut Keep by Ken MacLeod, and Frankenstein: How a Monster Became an Icon, edited by Sydney... Examined Worlds -


In-der-Blog-seinAfter Nature on thinking beyng through daseyn. It would be a gross misstatement to characterize Daseyn as some kind of required correlational center-piece in the sense that it is a "human-opening" through whose poetic thinking Beyng might appear, and that only through Daseyn-as-human-opening might Beyng appear or be understood. Just as the distinction between Being and Beyng holds in Heidegger to present a thought held in two completely different lights, so does the distinction between... Enowning -