Traditions

The Self-Emptying Subject Book Event: Angels and Flies

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com ¶   ¶ Beatrice Marovich is an assistant professor of theological studies at Hanover College. She works at the intersection of philosophy and theology and is currently working on a book called Creature Feeling: Political Theology and Animal Mortality. ¶ Gilles Deleuze was no great proponent of theology. But he did recognize a kind of potency that was present, at least historically, in the concept of God. In a lecture on the early modern work of Spinoza, Deleuze posed that, prior to the 17th century, the figure of God gave philosophers a kind of creative freedom. This is not to say, of course, that these thinkers weren’t constrained in many ways by church authority. But, Deleuze suggests, philosophers were nevertheless able to work with these constraints in order to render them, instead, “a means of fantastic creation.” Working with the figure of God offered these thinkers a kind of conceptual opportunity—to think right alongside a figure that was, itself, entirely free of constraints. “With God,” Deleuze suggests, “everything is permitted.” Concepts, when pushed up against the figure of God, became free of the task of representation. Concepts could take on “lines, colors, movements” they would never have had “without this detour through God.” There was, Delezue suggests, a kind of joy in this intellectual labor. ¶ For Deleuze, the creative joy of thinking with God was essentially a thing of the past. But in The Self-Emptying Subject: Kenosis and Immanence, Medieval to Modern Alex Dubilet seizes... -

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The Prescient Pessimism of Octavia Butler

// republished from LOST FUTURES // In the 2020s and ‘30s, fire ravages California towns. Migrant caravans make their way on foot towards the closed border of Oregon. A new President promises to “make America great again” through authoritarianism and political violence. This is the future imagined by Octavia Butler in Paradise of the Sower (1993) and Parable of the Talents (2000) but it is also, of course, partly our present. While we have not completely hit the apocalyptic depths of Butler’s imagination – slavery has not yet made a widespread return in the US, for instance – her novels provide us a way of thinking through issues surrounding climate-induced collapse. For anyone looking for consolation in the ruins, not much can be found in Butler’s work. She presents a pessimistic... -

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Swimming for Ireland and the U.S.A.

Liberal intelligentsia are like synchronised swim teams. No one wants to have his arse in the air while the others are going around in circles. Being on message, always on message is important if you want to remain on the team. Larry Donnelly writing in thejournal.ie swims on two national... -

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SEDUCTIVE ARTWORKS

What follows is a guest post by Nils-Hennes Stear. Note: This post is more or less a précis of part of the author’s ‘Meriting a Response: The Paradox of Seductive Artworks’, forthcoming in the Australasian Journal of Philosophy. ¶ During a recent flight, I watched Ridley Scott’s The Martian. It’s... -

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Swimming for Ireland and the U.S.A. Liberal intelligentsia are like synchronised swim teams. No one wants to have his arse in the air while the others are going around in circles. Being on message, always on message is important if you want to remain on the team. Larry Donnelly writing in thejournal.ie swims on two national teams the Irish and the American: (Boston attorney lecturing in Galway Uni.)irish journal articleThroughout the piece Larry sprinkles signals to show that his heart is... Ombhurbhuva -


A to Z az the (Hungarian) beku frozen (Indonesian) culus heavy (Somali) daji blow (Chinese) eetali earthen (Samoan) fomelis small (Greek) gadak carcass (Gujarati) himlib he was (Uzbek) injuk Poughkeepsie (Sundanese) jazo penalty (Uzbek) kuza come (Xhosa) locho route (Gujarati) moshar mosquito (Bengali) noofa diesel (Swahili) oq what (Portugese) qoxa smell (Azerbaijani) radam landfill (Maltese) sujub goes smoothly (Estonian) teeke blanket (Frisian) upad decline (Slovenian) vlon seethe (Albanian) weshxo diagram (Zulu) xim color (Hmong) yashb live (Uzbek) zibimi... Eric Linus Kaplan -


SEDUCTIVE ARTWORKS What follows is a guest post by Nils-Hennes Stear. Note: This post is more or less a précis of part of the author’s ‘Meriting a Response: The Paradox of Seductive Artworks’, forthcoming in the Australasian Journal of Philosophy. During a recent flight, I watched Ridley Scott’s The Martian. It’s a Robinsonade tale about Mark Watney (Matt Damon), an astronaut stranded on Mars and engineering his own survival. The film was watchable enough—well produced, acted, and visually... Aesthetics for Birds -


The Self-Emptying Subject Book Event: Angels and Flies Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com   Beatrice Marovich is an assistant professor of theological studies at Hanover College. She works at the intersection of philosophy and theology and is currently working on a book called Creature Feeling: Political Theology and Animal Mortality. Gilles Deleuze was no great proponent of theology. But he did recognize a kind of potency that was present, at least historically, in the concept of God. In a lecture on the early modern... An und für sich -


Rojava: patchworking from the Real The following builds on points made by Michael in “Global Wyrding and Deeply Adaptive Patchworking“: As long as humans have been gathering and cooperating in relatively stable sedentary complexes, issues of social composition and functional governance have been discussed, debated, and often violently contested. Interest in patchwork, then, can (and I argue should) be viewed as a reinvigoration of a long-standing focus on social organization and intentional forms of collective living. Key here is the... Synthetic Zero -


The Prescient Pessimism of Octavia Butler // republished from LOST FUTURES // In the 2020s and ‘30s, fire ravages California towns. Migrant caravans make their way on foot towards the closed border of Oregon. A new President promises to “make America great again” through authoritarianism and political violence. This is the future imagined by Octavia Butler in Paradise of the Sower (1993) and Parable of the Talents (2000) but it is also, of course, partly our present. While we have not completely hit the apocalyptic depths of... Synthetic Zero -


Barron's on the acceleration of change. The philosopher Martin Heidegger argued that technological advancement is a process of revealing and building. We can’t control what we reveal through exploration and discovery, but we can—and should—be wise about what we build. If you just “move fast and break things,” don’t be surprised if you break something important. Enowning -


Values in Psychological Science Today's post is by Lisa Osbeck. Lisa is a Professor of Psychology with interest in the Philosophy of Science. Her work explores the psychological dimensions of science practice and considers how they can help us better understand both science and persons. In this post, Lisa presents her new book Values in Psychological Science: Re-imagining Epistemic Priorities at a New Frontier, published by Cambrige University Press.In previous work, I collaborated with Nancy Nersessian and colleagues in an ethnographic study... Imperfect Cognitions -


Born in Exile by George Gissing (pub.1892) George Gissing’s rate of production worked against the development of a good style. He wrote eight hours a day producing a novel every year. When he showed a publisher two volumes of Demos that had as a theme contemporary worker agitation he was told that if he could produce a third volume they would publish it immediately. In those days novels came in 3 volumes. He set to and wrote it in two weeks. No,... Ombhurbhuva -


The Actual and the Rational: Hegel and Objective Spirit 2019.01.06 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jean-François Kervégan, The Actual and the Rational: Hegel and Objective Spirit, Daniela Ginsburg and Martin Shuster (trs.), University of Chicago Press, 2018, 384pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226023809. Reviewed by Frederick Neuhouser, Barnard College, Columbia University As its title implies, Jean-François Kervégan's book is a comprehensive and systematic reconstruction of Hegel's complex doctrine of objective spirit. It is comprehensive because it aims to explain the... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Philosophy of Chemistry [Revised entry by Michael Weisberg, Paul Needham, and Robin Hendry on January 16, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Chemistry is the study of the structure and transformation of matter. When Aristotle wrote the first systematic treatises on chemistry in the 4th century BCE, his conceptual grasp of the nature of matter was tailored to accommodate a relatively simple range of observable phenomena. In the 21st century, chemistry has become the largest scientific discipline,... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Informed Consent [Revised entry by Nir Eyal on January 16, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Informed consent is currently treated as the core of bioethics. In clinical practice, the doctrine of informed consent rose to dominance during the course of the 20th century. It replaced a medical ethos founded on trust in physicians' decisions, often on the assumption that "doctor knows best", with an ethos that sought to put patients in charge of their own care.... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Philodemus [Revised entry by David Blank on January 16, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Philodemus of Gadara (ca. 110 - ca. 30 BCE) was an Epicurean philosopher and epigrammatist who, having studied in the Epicurean school at Athens when it was led by Zeno of Sidon (c. 150 - c. 75 BCE), moved to Italy, probably in the 70s BCE. There he may have lived in the Greek town of Naples, and perhaps also in... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Mindscape Podcast: Philosophy Outside Academia By Sean Carroll It took me a while to catch on, but I’ve become very excited about the prospects of podcasting as a medium of ... Read more... Blog of the APA -


CFP: Philosophy as a Way of Life The journal Metaphilosophy invites papers from scholars to produce a special issue of the journal on Philosophy as a Way of Life.  The special guest editors are James M. Ambury (jamesambury@kings.edu), Tushar Irani (tirani@wesleyan.edu), and Kathleen Wallace (kathleen.wallace@hofstra.edu). The notion of philosophy as a way of life has roots in antiquity in the work of thinkers from a wide variety of cultural and intellectual traditions. For these thinkers, the practice of philosophy was not confined... PEA Soup -


Pop Matters on disclosure in the new version of Malick's The Tree of Life. To call Malick's aesthetics "Heideggerian" may be too schematic and reductive, but the influence of Heidegger is clear. Intrinsic to being human, according to Heidegger, is the ability to ask questions about being, about the mysteries and meaning of being. For Heidegger, we are predisposed to be philosophers, to both be intimately a part of the world and simultaneously, and paradoxically,... Enowning -


A New Argument Against Capital Punishment. THINKING FOR A LIVING: A PHILOSOPHER’S NOTEBOOK 18 PREVIOUS INSTALLMENTS #17: Fear, denial, and loathing in the philosophy of mind. #16: The political aesthetics of outer space. #15: The paradox of distributive social justice, and what is to be done? #14: How a priori knowledge is really possible. #13: Is a priori knowledge really possible? … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


Passion facade la Sagrada Familia (Photo) Behold the (modern) man… Quantum Est In Rebus Inane -


In Counter Currents Pravat Ranjan Sethi ask questions. Heidegger’s chief concern is not with how this particular thing X relates to that particular thing Y, but rather how it is that the meaning of Xs and Ys and their possible relations gets determined in the first place. What does it mean for such things to be; what does it mean to say that they are? This question of “ontology” (the study of being), rather than... Enowning -


In NDPR Dimitri Ginev reviews Jeff Kochan's Science as Social Existence: Heidegger and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. Heidegger argues that like Dasein's basic mode of being-in-the-world, the "derivative" mode of being-in-the-world-by-objectifying-the-world finds its meaning in temporality. Like all meaningful entities taking place in the facticity of existence, the procedurally objectified scientific objects always remain amenable to a meaningful reconstitution within the temporalizing of the mathematically projected horizon (conceived of as a horizon of temporality).... Enowning -