Traditions

Pandemocracy and the State of Exception

These reflections are not only the product of our current global crisis but also respond to the theoretical challenge of thinking otherwise about the nature of biopolitical governance, the challenge of discovering some resources within the biopolitical to support an insurgent form of life. Recently, Roberto Esposito in Two (2013) has made the attempt to discover in the globalization of sovereign debt the possibility of overcoming the sovereign splitting of the biopolitical decision, between “making live” and “letting die”: “The fact that all states, divided by a clear in equality of resources, are now indebted to an entity as elusive as global finance means that for the first time, perhaps, the world will experience a condition of shared suffering. It is as if splitting had become the general form of unity. We are joined by a debt that separates us even from ourselves, by suspending us from a model of development that produces loss. Since everyone is included in it, we are at the same time also all excluded. The point of arrival for economic-political theology is identity, with no remainders, between inside and outside, whole and part, One and Two.” (Two, 208) Esposito cautions us not to try to return to this condition of the “identity . . . between . . . One and Two” by resurrecting some new form of sovereignty. Instead, he suggests that we create what I am calling a “pandemocracy” out of our globalized condition of being unified by our experience of being... -

Read More @ An und für sich

Luca Incurvati’s Conceptions of Set, 2

We are still on Chapter 1 of Luca’s book. Sorry about taking longer than I had intended to get back to this. But I’d promised myself to get the answers to the Exercises for Chs 32 and 33 of IFL2 (on natural deduction for quantifier arguments) done and dusted. Thirty eight pages(!) of work later, they are online! ¶ Let’s take it that the concept of set is (at least in part) characterized by Luca’s three conditions — Unity (a set is in some sense a unity, distinct from its members), Unique Decomposition (a set decomposes into its members in just one way), Extensionality. ¶ Which leaves more to be said, no doubt. But then there are various possible views of the role of... -

Read More @ Logic Matters
RUMBLINGS

More and more strongly I am coming to suspect that America will emerge from this medical crisis changed in significant ways.  Perhaps better, perhaps worse, but changed.  Changed economically, changed politically, changed socially.  I was born in the fourth year of the Great Depression and grew up as a boy... -

Read More @ The Philosopher’s Stone
Episode 21: Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim

Like everyone else, my life has been upended by the global pandemic.  I have five kids in public schools here in South Carolina (plus one very rambunctious and ornery toddler), so I am now a homeschooling Mom in addition to being a professor, podcaster, and writer.  I am sleep... -

Read More @ Virtue Blog

Recent Sites Posting In Traditions


All Posts in Traditions

RUMBLINGS More and more strongly I am coming to suspect that America will emerge from this medical crisis changed in significant ways.  Perhaps better, perhaps worse, but changed.  Changed economically, changed politically, changed socially.  I was born in the fourth year of the Great Depression and grew up as a boy during the Second World War.  Those two events changed America fundamentally.  I do not yet have anything like a coherent analysis or set of expectations,... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Luca Incurvati’s Conceptions of Set, 2 We are still on Chapter 1 of Luca’s book. Sorry about taking longer than I had intended to get back to this. But I’d promised myself to get the answers to the Exercises for Chs 32 and 33 of IFL2 (on natural deduction for quantifier arguments) done and dusted. Thirty eight pages(!) of work later, they are online! Let’s take it that the concept of set is (at least in part) characterized by Luca’s three... Logic Matters -


Episode 21: Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim Like everyone else, my life has been upended by the global pandemic.  I have five kids in public schools here in South Carolina (plus one very rambunctious and ornery toddler), so I am now a homeschooling Mom in addition to being a professor, podcaster, and writer.  I am sleep deprived and each day I fall further and further behind were I’d like to be.  My priority right now is my family. However, I’m still trying... Virtue Blog -


Pandemocracy and the State of Exception These reflections are not only the product of our current global crisis but also respond to the theoretical challenge of thinking otherwise about the nature of biopolitical governance, the challenge of discovering some resources within the biopolitical to support an insurgent form of life. Recently, Roberto Esposito in Two (2013) has made the attempt to discover in the globalization of sovereign debt the possibility of overcoming the sovereign splitting of the biopolitical decision, between “making... An und für sich -


A World is Ending My article on the pandemic in the journal Identities can be found here. Larval Subjects -


A conjecture on deferralist indexicalism Imagine we do take propositions to be formed by (essential) indexicals. That is, sentences could have indexicals and non-indexicals (substantive) but:i. only indexicals directly refer - ouch, hard thing to state, but I'm conjecturing that substantive refer only through indexical definitions (the translation of a de dicto expression into a de re one is a step towards providing indexical definitions but cannot be the whole translation for, as Perry wrote (in The problem of the... No Borders Metaphysics -


A. Spanos:  Isaac Newton and his two years in quarantine:  how science could germinate in bewildering ways (Guest post) . Aris Spanos Wilson Schmidt Professor of Economics Department of Economics Virginia Tech Beyond the plenitude of misery and suffering that pandemics bring down on humanity, occasionally they contribute to the betterment of humankind by (inadvertently) boosting creative activity that leads to knowledge, and not just in epidemiology. A case in point is that of Isaac Newton and the pandemic of 1665-6.  Born in 1642 (on Christmas day – old Julian calendar) in the small... Error Statistics -


Events [Revised entry by Roberto Casati and Achille Varzi on April 3, 2020. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Smiles, walks, dances, weddings, explosions, hiccups, hand-waves, arrivals and departures, births and deaths, thunder and lightning: the variety of the world seems to lie not only in the assortment of its ordinary citizens - animals and physical objects, and perhaps minds, sets, abstract particulars - but also in the sort of things that happen to or are performed... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Wisdom and Chaos I. The Puzzle: Why Aren't Academic Philosophers Wise? Etymologically, philosophy is the study of wisdom. In the popular imagination, philosophers sit cross-legged, uttering cryptic profundities through long white beards. Real philosophy professors spend considerable time reading texts from the "wisdom traditions", and on ethics, the meaning of life, and the fundamental nature of reality. So you might think that the average philosopher would be at least a little bit wiser than the average non-philosopher. Since... Splintered Mind -


Nature/Nurture (Forum for Philosophy)     Nature/Nurture (Forum for Philosophy) Scientists agree that nature and nurture are essential ingredients in human development. But if both the blank slate and genetic determinism have been rejected, why do researchers still disagree and what is it that they disagree about? Join us as we’ll explore the issues at stake, taking a wide variety of perspectives, from the philosophy of science to epigenetics, and behavioural science to developmental psychology.   Speakers Tom Dickins... LSE Philosophy -


Peace (Forum for Philosophy)     Peace (Forum for Philosophy) Peace is highly valued, but how is it achieved? Why are some periods in world history relatively peaceful compared to others? What, if anything, can be done to ensure peace now? Are there limits to what we are justified in doing to ensure peace? Is pacifism a justified response to war? We discuss the history, ethics, and politics of peace.   Speakers Louise Arimatsu Distinguished Policy Fellow, LSE Robin... LSE Philosophy -


Virtual Colloquium 3, featuring Dominik Perler I am pleased to announce that Dominik Perler (HU Berlin) will be the speaker at the next virtual colloquium. Title: “Olivi on Personhood.” Abstract: Following Boethius, most medieval philosophers defined a person as an individual substance of a rational nature. However, in the late thirteenth century Peter John Olivi presented a new definition, characterizing a person as an entity that “fully returns to itself and abides in itself or that perfectly reflects upon itself.” In... In medias PHIL -


73 - The Ethics of Healthcare Prioritisation during COVID 19 We have a limited number of ventilators? Who should get access to them? In this episode I talk to Lars Sandman. Lars is a Professor of Healthcare Ethics at Linköping University, Sweden. Lars’s research involves studying ethical aspects of distributing scarce resources within health care and studying and developing methods for ethical analyses of health-care procedures. We discuss the ethics of healthcare prioritisation in the midst of the COVID 19 pandemic, focusing specifically on some... Philosophical Disquisitions -


Pandemic Effects on Conference & Event Planning for 2021 & Beyond The Covid-19 pandemic has caused many upcoming academic events to be cancelled and many to be moved online. How is it affecting the planning of events scheduled a bit farther out, say, for next year? [calendar design by Otavio Santiago]One reader asks: I’d be interested to know how people are planning conferences for 2021… I’m presuming any conference will have to develop contingency plans of some sort in case another “wave” hits.   Have any 2021... Daily Nous -


THERE IS SOMETHING GOOD ABOUT ZOOM Next Thursday I shall spend an hour visiting a class on the Critique being taught by a professor at the University of Wyoming.  Not bad. The Philosopher’s Stone -


Review "The Question Concerning Technology" with Dr. Duane Armitage Enowning -


Here-Being in The Middlebury Campus German philosopher Martin Heidegger is famous for his theory of Dasein, or “There-Being.” For Heidegger, the temporary nature of things renders them meaningful. Thus, meaning in a person’s life comes from the acknowledgement that one cannot do everything before they die. One action or decision precludes others. Anyone who has walked into a bookshop and realized that they cannot read every book will understand this concept. Thus, we exist as... Enowning -


“Modulating the Mind” – Dr. Judy Illes at TEDx Abbotsford Neuroethics Canada’s Dr. Judy Illes was invited to speak at the TEDx Abbotsford in November 2019. We are pleased to share that you may now watch her presentation! In her TEDx talk, Dr. Illes discussed how how people think about brain surgery for neurologic and psychiatric conditions, including ethical concerns about hope versus hype, rights, justice, agency, and personal privacy.   Neuroethics -


AFB’S TERMS OF ART #9: EXPRESSION Now that increasing numbers of people are stuck at home and sheltering in place, I figured I’d do a little series. Every weekday for the duration of this intense period, I’ll post a short definition of some term in/related to aesthetics and philosophy of art. Let’s see how this goes! See them all here. Terms of Art #9: expression Paris street art [source]Pronunciation: ex-PRESH-un Definition: There are two ways that this word is used in... Aesthetics for Birds -


Fallacies [Revised entry by Hans Hansen on April 2, 2020. Changes to: Main text] Two competing conceptions of fallacies are that they are false but popular beliefs and that they are deceptively bad arguments. These we may distinguish as the belief and argument conceptions of fallacies. Academic writers who have given the most attention to the subject of fallacies insist on, or at least prefer, the argument conception of fallacies, but the belief conception is prevalent... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -