Traditions

Envisioning Civic Palliative Care

Dying cannot be understood properly, or responded to well, without recourse to the connections between the dying experience and the larger social structures that make up a social and civic community. To develop this perspective further, it is important to envision a new kind of palliative care system that extends beyond professional expertise and a clincal model to encompass the capacities, resources, and social capital of entire communities. Such a system might aptly be called civic palliative care. It does not exist anywhere in the United States, but it is within our grasp. ¶ Values Animating Palliative Care ¶ Death and dying are among the most intimate and personal experiences in human life. One becomes preoccupied with disease, symptoms, medical treatments. Yet, this is not the whole truth. Intense, highly charged and delicate, invested with meanings that are at once intimately personal or private and necessarily social and public, dying is a particularly complex social performance that takes place in an exceedingly dense or thick cultural environment. Dying well requires a delicate social ecology of caring connections and meaning that can surround and support dying patients and families as they strive to make sense of what has befallen them. ¶ In the past, when it was largely technologically impotent, medicine (together with religion) at its best created just such an ecology of social rituals and cultural meanings during the dying process. To varying degrees, dying could be a time of repairing and renewing relationships and identities—with family and friends... -

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Assembly– Fragments of a Thought

In In Defense of Things, Bjørnar Olsen notes that the word “thing” comes from the Old English term þing, meaning assembly or gathering.  Things are that which gather or assemble.  They are both assembled and assemble.  But what is it that things assemble?  We are accustomed to thinking of things as assemblages; especially technical things.  The tree assembles sunshine, water, and nutrients from the earth in forming itself to sing its hymn to the sky and the land.  Yet it also gathers all sorts of insects, birds, squirrels and other creatures aside that make their life in and around the earth.  Indeed, in dropping its leaves, the tree contributes to the creation of the soil upon which it depends to persist.  But it is... -

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Now published: “Robustness Analysis as Explanatory Reasoning”

My article “Robustness Analysis as Explanatory Reasoning” is now out in the most recent issue of BJPS. Free access for a limited time via this link! I’m especially proud of this article! Here’s the abstract: When scientists seek further confirmation of their results, they often attempt to duplicate the results... -

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Biodeconstruction: Jacques Derrida and the Life Sciences

2018.07.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews ¶ Francesco Vitale, Biodeconstruction: Jacques Derrida and the Life Sciences, Mauro Senatore (tr.), SUNY Press, 2018, 256 pp., $90.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781438468853. ¶ Reviewed by Hans-Jörg Rheinberger, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science Francesco Vitale has... -

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Assembly– Fragments of a Thought In In Defense of Things, Bjørnar Olsen notes that the word “thing” comes from the Old English term þing, meaning assembly or gathering.  Things are that which gather or assemble.  They are both assembled and assemble.  But what is it that things assemble?  We are accustomed to thinking of things as assemblages; especially technical things.  The tree assembles sunshine, water, and nutrients from the earth in forming itself to sing its hymn to the sky... Larval Subjects -


Biodeconstruction: Jacques Derrida and the Life Sciences 2018.07.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Francesco Vitale, Biodeconstruction: Jacques Derrida and the Life Sciences, Mauro Senatore (tr.), SUNY Press, 2018, 256 pp., $90.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781438468853. Reviewed by Hans-Jörg Rheinberger, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science Francesco Vitale has written a remarkable book. It rests on an extended analysis of the largely unpublished seminar La vie la mort that Jacques Derrida gave in the winter of 1975-76.... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Now published: “Robustness Analysis as Explanatory Reasoning” My article “Robustness Analysis as Explanatory Reasoning” is now out in the most recent issue of BJPS. Free access for a limited time via this link! I’m especially proud of this article! Here’s the abstract: When scientists seek further confirmation of their results, they often attempt to duplicate the results using diverse means. To the […] Choice and Inference -


Envisioning Civic Palliative Care Dying cannot be understood properly, or responded to well, without recourse to the connections between the dying experience and the larger social structures that make up a social and civic community. To develop this perspective further, it is important to envision a new kind of palliative care system that extends beyond professional expertise and a clincal model to encompass the capacities, resources, and social capital of entire communities. Such a system might aptly be called... Hastings Bioethics -


Raising My Child in a Doomed World Some would say the mistake was having our daughter in the first place. The Stone -


Daniela Vallega-Neu on the changes from Contributions to Event. In The Event [Heidegger] criticizes the notion of Da-sein in Contributions, and says, "Da-sein is certainly thought essentially out of the event, and yet it is thought too one-sidely with reference to the human being" (GA 71: 5). This and the fact that Dasein in Being and Time designates primarily human being so much that it invited a misinterpretation of Dasein as subject, are the reasons that... Enowning -


JERRY FRESIA AND ME My exchange with Jerry Fresia has now become much more serious than a dispute between two old lefties.  Since I think his latest extended comment must be read, I will reproduce it at the end of these remarks, rather than simply suggest that you hunt it up in the comments section.Jerry’s statement is a cry from the heart, a cri de coeur, as the French say, and it takes precedence over everything I wrote in... The Philosopher’s Stone -


WiNE Program Out The program for the 2019 Arizona Workshop in Normative Ethics (WiNE) is now available here. The post WiNE Program Out appeared first on PEA Soup. PEA Soup -


Rebooting the Ethical Soldier In the coming age of high-tech warfare, the old rules of conflict will not apply. The Stone -


WHAT IS TRUTH?, ASKED PILATE The exchanges in the comments section triggered by Jerry Fresia’s comment and my response raise very interesting questions about what we know and how we know it.  To an extent that most of us do not often reflect upon, our knowledge of the world is socially grounded, not the product of individual observation or the formulation and confirmation and disconfirmation of hypotheses.  Let me offer, as a start, a few trivial examples and then a... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Finding Work That You Love Steve Jobs, in his 2005 commencement speech at Stanford, argued that we should do the work we love. Here is an excerpt of his main idea: You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work.... Reason and Meaning -


Latest Free Speech Controversy “Personally, I find the tiger’s views abhorrent,” read a New York Times op-ed column published just after the tiger got onto a school bus filled with third-graders. “But it’s far worse that left-wing groups are protesting by carrying fire and boarding up all their tiger-sized windows.” “Let’s not forget; there’s plenty of people who find Bernie Sanders’ views offensive, too. It goes both ways.” Here. Feminist Philosophers -


Raising a Child in a Doomed World Some would say our mistake was having our daughter in the first place. The Stone -


The Paris End of Collins Street, or Why Gaston Bachelard–Oops, Jean Baudrillard–is a Nitwit. Sorry about that. I don’t have anything against Gaston Bachelard. Really. He looks like a kindly old gent, if a bit scruffy. There could be an I-told-you-so twinkle in his eye, but it might have just been the light. All things considered, he’s OK. You’ve got to admire a bloke who started off as a … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


How to learn twelve languages ... and forget some People ask me often how I managed to learn so many languages. Here is the story.Many people think that it’s an effort to learn a new language, and indeed, you need to do something for it. Nonetheless, it’s much easier, if it becomes a part of your daily life. So it’s for a child, so it’s for many living abroad, and so it’s for me: I prefer to read a book in the original language.... Philosophy by the Way -


The Moebius Strip of Sexual Contracts First some data. The so-called “incels” (involuntary celibates) are part of what is usually referred to as the “online male supremacist ecosystem.” Members of this (not only) online subculture define themselves as unable to find a romantic or sexual partner despite desiring one, a state they describe as inceldom. They are mostly white, male and heterosexual, and their speech is characterized by resentment, misanthropy, self-pity, self-loathing, misogyny, racism, a sense of entitlement to sex, and the endorsement of violence against sexually active people. They perceive their position not simply... The Philosophical Salon -


Jason W. Alvis on Heidegger's phenomenology of the inconspicuous. Whatever is inconspicuous has a distinctive unique "ability" (barkeit) and understood in its "paradoxical" (as "contrary to appearances") provenance, seeks to go beyond dichotomies that often hinder phenomenological thinking. It refers to what is integrated within, yet holistically impacting the everyday, and as the German adjective unscheinbar (traceable to the fifteenth century) refers, it does not signify by being bright (leuchtend), manifested (offenbar), brilliant (glänzend), or... Enowning -


David Murray I was lucky enough to have had David Murray as one of my tutors at Birkbeck who I’ve only just discovered, died two years ago (I don’t think I’d any idea that he was originally a Canuck). Here is his obituary in the FT and Toocool2betrue along with a squib from the Edmonton Journal, and so far as… Man Without Qualities -


“When Did the Occupation End?”– Material Temporality In early August I will be going on an archeological dig at a WWII Russian POW camp with the Unruly Heritage project in Svaerholt, in the northern most region of Norway.  You can read more about the early stages of the Svaerholt dig here.  I have never done anything like this and am both deeply excited and trepidatious.  Reaching the location requires a two hour boat road.  Once there, I’m told we get to shore... Larval Subjects -


Vaidya on Anupalabadhi I spent about one and a half hours reading this interviewhindu syllogismsand that I suppose gives me the right to comment on it. I have, so to speak, paid my way – the way of the internet savant.I’ve said this before about Sanskrit and Sanskritism. Poetry is what is lost in translation. If a philosophical text cannot be translated it is not philosophy. Philosophy is what is retained in translation. Do you really have to... Ombhurbhuva -