Traditions

An argument that the moment of death is at most epistemically vague

Assume vagueness is not epistemic. This seems a safe statement: If it is vaguely true that the world contains severe pain, then definitely the world contains pain. ¶ But now take the common philosophical view that the moment of death is vague, except in the case of instant annihilation and the like. The following story seems logically possible: Rover the dog definitely dies in severe pain, in the sense that it is definitely true that he is in severe pain for the last hours of his life all the way until death, which comes from his owner humanely putting him out of his misery. The moment of death is, however, vague. And definitely nothing other than Rover feels any pain that day, whether vaguely or definitely. ¶ Suppose that t1 is a time when it is vague whether Rover is still alive or already dead. Then: ¶ Definitely, if Rover is alive at t1, he is in severe pain at t1. (By 2) ¶ Definitely, if Rover is not alive at t1, he is not in severe pain at t1. (Uncontroversial) ¶ It is vague whether Rover is alive at t1. (By 2) ¶ Therefore, it is vague whether Rover is in severe pain at t1. (By 3-5) ¶ Therefore, it is vague whether the world contains severe pain at t1. (By 2 and 6, as 2 says that Rover is definitely the only candidate for pain) ¶ Therefore, definitely the world contains pain at t1. (By 1 and... -

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The Imagination in German Idealism and Romanticism

2019.10.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews ¶ Gerad Gentry and Konstantin Pollok (eds.), The Imagination in German Idealism and Romanticism, Cambridge University Press, 2019, 267pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107197701. ¶ Reviewed by Richard Eldridge, Swarthmore College This collection of essays is devoted to the interpretation of work on the imagination done by Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Herder, Schleiermacher, and Schlegel. It divides fairly naturally into two parts: i) close readings of Kant, Fichte, and Hegel on the 'mental mechanics' of imagination as a faculty that mediates between sensibility and understanding, and ii) essays on the role of imagination in the interpretation of art, human beings, and other cultures, as that role was conceived by Herder, Schleiermacher, Schlegel and Hegel. One... -

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Pavel Haas Quartet play Janacek (video)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtmX7-A9CUo ¶ The PHQ playing the second movement of Janacek’s second string quartet “Intimate Letters”, a couple days ago on Dutch television. ¶ The post Pavel Haas Quartet play Janacek (video) appeared first on Logic Matters. -

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John Dewey Research Center To Be Established In Shanghai

East China Normal University in Shanghai will be the home of a new philosophy research center focused on John Dewey. Li Fushun and Chu Junhong, “阿尔山牧歌 镜心” ¶ According to Shine, since 2004, researchers at the university have been involved in a translating Dewey’s works into Chinese, producing 39... -

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Pavel Haas Quartet play Janacek (video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtmX7-A9CUo The PHQ playing the second movement of Janacek’s second string quartet “Intimate Letters”, a couple days ago on Dutch television. The post Pavel Haas Quartet play Janacek (video) appeared first on Logic Matters. Logic Matters -


An argument that the moment of death is at most epistemically vague Assume vagueness is not epistemic. This seems a safe statement: If it is vaguely true that the world contains severe pain, then definitely the world contains pain. But now take the common philosophical view that the moment of death is vague, except in the case of instant annihilation and the like. The following story seems logically possible: Rover the dog definitely dies in severe pain, in the sense that it is definitely true that he... Alexander Pruss -


Scientific Progress [Revised entry by Ilkka Niiniluoto on October 16, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Science is often distinguished from other domains of human culture by its progressive nature: in contrast to art, religion, philosophy, morality, and politics, there exist clear standards or normative criteria for identifying improvements and advances in science. For example, the historian of science George Sarton argued that "the acquisition and systematization of positive knowledge are the only human activities which are... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Experiment in Physics [Revised entry by Allan Franklin and Slobodan Perovic on October 16, 2019. Changes to: Main text] Physics, and natural science in general, is a reasonable enterprise based on valid experimental evidence, criticism, and rational discussion. It provides us with knowledge of the physical world, and it is experiment that provides the evidence that grounds this knowledge. Experiment plays many roles in science. One of its important roles is to test theories and to provide the... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


John Dewey Research Center To Be Established In Shanghai East China Normal University in Shanghai will be the home of a new philosophy research center focused on John Dewey. Li Fushun and Chu Junhong, “阿尔山牧歌 镜心” According to Shine, since 2004, researchers at the university have been involved in a translating Dewey’s works into Chinese, producing 39 volumes so far. The new research center’s initial funding is coming from a 3 million yuan (approximately $422,000) donation from Hainan Enxiang Education Investment Company. 100 years ago,... Daily Nous -


An aging philosopher returns to the essential question: ‘What is the point of it all?’ An aging philosopher returns to the essential question: ‘What is the point of it all?’ A reader sent me the following video. (Click on the link above.) It records the last reflections on life and death by the philosopher Herbert Fingarette (1921-2018) who had a long career at the University of California, Santa Barbara. As my reader put it: … there is an immediacy here that cuts to the bone. There is a difference between... Reason and Meaning -


The Imagination in German Idealism and Romanticism 2019.10.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gerad Gentry and Konstantin Pollok (eds.), The Imagination in German Idealism and Romanticism, Cambridge University Press, 2019, 267pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107197701. Reviewed by Richard Eldridge, Swarthmore College This collection of essays is devoted to the interpretation of work on the imagination done by Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Herder, Schleiermacher, and Schlegel. It divides fairly naturally into two parts: i) close readings of Kant, Fichte,... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Architecture Exchange 3 The Architecture Exchange, founded by Joseph Bedford & Jessica Reynolds in 2013, is a series of events bringing philosophers and architects into conversation. I was the subject of the first event in London, which will appear in book form in February from Bloosmbury. Chantal Mouffe was the second subject (also in London, I believe). The third will be devoted to Jacques Rancière, and will be held November 16 at Cooper Union in New York, for... Object Oriented Philosophy -


call from Italy for papers on OOO [p.s. this is for a journal, not a conference] CALL FOR PAPERS Decentering the human Why/Because Object-Oriented Ontology (OOO) Edizioni Kaiak Aphilosophicaljourney Deadline: 31 October 2019 Abstract: max. 500 words mail: rivistakaiak@libero.it http://www.kaiak-pj.it/it/ Possible topics: Anti-mining: undermining, overmining, duomining; Withdrawal: real object vs. sensual object; Flatness: liberal vs. egualitarian perspective Vicarious causation: panpsychism vs. polypsichism; Subscendence in mereological relations; OOO between Speculative Realism and New Materialism; OOO and Ecology: global warming, biodiversity, catastrophe; OOO and Media Theory: apparatus, screen, Internet of Things (IoT); OOO... Object Oriented Philosophy -


Louis de La Forge [Revised entry by Andrea Sangiacomo and Desmond Clarke on October 15, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Louis de la Forge was among the first group of self-styled disciples to edit and disseminate the writings of Descartes in the years immediately following his death in Sweden (1650). La Forge initially used his medical training to comment on Cartesian physiology. He also wrote the first monograph on Descartes' theory of the human mind, in which he... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


To φ Or Not To φ To φ Or Not To φ by Tanya Kostochka Other Daily Nous Comics / More Info About DN Comics Tanya Kostochka on Twitter The post To φ Or Not To φ appeared first on Daily Nous. Daily Nous -


Oligonism Monism holds there is only one (or at least one fundamental) thing in reality: the universe. Pluralism, as normally taken, holds there are many. An underexplored metaphysical view is oligonism: the view that there are (at least fundamentally) only a handful of objects in reality, but more than one. One way to get oligonism is to take the universe of monism and add God while holding that God is not derivative from the universe. But... Alexander Pruss -


In the WSJ, Stephen Miller on ‘Fuzzy-Profound’ Words. Contemporary intellectual life, Saul Bellow implies in “Herzog” (1964), is filled with fuzzy-profound terms. Herzog writes to Martin Heidegger: “I should like to know what you mean by the expression ‘the fall into the quotidian.’ When did this fall occur? Where were we standing when it happened?” Enowning -


Assessing the Moral Status of Robots: A Shorter Defence of Ethical Behaviourism [This is the text of a lecture that I delivered at Tilburg University on the 24th of September 2019. It was delivered as part of the 25th Anniversary celebrations for TILT (Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society). My friend and colleague Sven Nyholm was the discussant for the evening. The lecture is based on my longer academic article ‘Welcoming Robots into the Moral Circle: A Defence of Ethical Behaviourism’ but was written from scratch... Philosophical Disquisitions -


Mini-Heap The latest links from the Heap… “People who we thought had high self-control to achieve great life outcomes instead are really good at forming the right habits. They seem to understand the influence of situations and choose ones in which it’s easier to repeat desired actions.” — Wendy Wood (USC) on habits Why worry about AI? — Evan Selinger (RIT) surveys the array of reasons Attention may seem like the brain casting a “spotlight”, but it is... Daily Nous -


Lunar Leitmotifs: Red Moon by Kim Stanley Robinson Red Moon is definitely not destined to be among my favorite Kim Stanley Robinson novels.  It's nowhere near the Mars Trilogy, Aurora, or The Years of Rice and Salt (my personal favorites), nor is it quite as much fun as Galileo's Dream, as engaging as Shaman, or as wide-ranging as 2312.  In fact, Red Moon may be my least favorite of KSR's novels I've read.  But as I said in my review of New York... Examined Worlds -


Harold Bloom Harold Bloom: 1930-2019 “Harold Bloom.” Contemporary Authors, Gale, 2018. The Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University, Harold Bloom is perhaps the best-known literary critic in America today, as well as one of the most controversial. Describing the influence of the past upon poetry as a relationship of conflict, Bloom’s writings have consistently contradicted mainstream… Man Without Qualities -


Hannah Arendt in St. Peter’s Square Neither one of us expected to be talking about Hannah Arendt at the Vatican.  We had been invited to give talks at the Pontifical Academy of Sciences on the scientific and ethical challenges posed by personalized medicine.  Walking across the cobblestones of St. Peter’s Square we began to discuss how society regulates biomedical research. Are institutional review boards capable of dealing with innovations like personalized medicine? Are they too bound by regulations? Can they ask... Hastings Bioethics -


I've updated my Being and Time application, btapp. It now has the MaR and SuZ pages through section 16, including Tom Sheehan's paragraph-by-paragraph paraphrase. New feature: the marginal notes from Heidegger copy of B&T and Tom's notes are included in the paraphrase. Enowning -


Russell’s Logical Atomism [Revised entry by Kevin Klement on October 14, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970) described his philosophy as a kind of "logical atomism", by which he meant to endorse both a metaphysical view and a certain methodology for doing philosophy. The metaphysical view amounts to the claim that the world consists of a plurality of independently existing things exhibiting qualities and standing in relations. According to logical atomism, all truths... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -