Traditions

Which Came First, Creative Practices or Imagination?

Max Jones is a Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Bristol. He is particularly interested in the implications of embodied cognition, predictive processing, ecological psychology, and active perception for our understanding of how we think in more abstract ways (for example, mathematical thought), and has recently been working on embodied and enculturated approaches to the imagination. A post by Max Jones and Sam WilkinsonIn an earlier paper (Jones & Wilkinson 2020) and a previous Junkyard blog post by Max, we suggested that (although we are both fans) the predictive processing framework has considerably more work to do if it is to provide a satisfying account of the imagination, and, importantly, more work than some of its key proponents seem to appreciate. Our task here can be interpreted as an attempt to gesture towards and anticipate the implications of a positive account, consistent with predictive processing, on the foundations of our critical ground-clearing. Our suggestions, however, generalise and do not require any adherence to, or even comprehension of, predictive processing. Sam Wilkinson is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Exeter.He works on hallucinations, delusions, psychosis, psychological trauma, brain injury, and the nature of illness and wellbeing. I also have a general interest in perception, action and emotion as viewed from predictive processing and embodied perspectives, and especially in the way that the mind harnesses social and cultural context to enhance and shape cognition. A major part of our worry for predictive processing was that, while it gives... -

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A Theory of Human Dignity, #18–Pain and Suffering.

TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction                                                                                                 II. Refuting the Dignity-Skeptic and Debunking a Dignity-Debunking Argument                                                                   III. The Metaphysics of Human Dignity III.1 What Human Dignity Is III.2 Real Persons and Minded Animals III.3 A Metaphysical Definition of Real Personhood IV. Nonideal Dignitarian Moral Theory IV.0 How Nonideal Can a World Be? IV.1 The Skinny … [continue reading] -

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Individuals Declared Brain-Dead Remain Biologically Alive

A remarkable experiment was reported last week in which a kidney from a genetically modified pig was attached to blood vessels in a brain-dead individual, with the family’s consent. In the study, hailed as “a huge breakthrough,” the pig’s kidney functioned normally, suggesting the future feasibility of successfully transplanting organs from... -

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MILLS CONTINUES TO DELIGHT

I continue to find every page of Charles Mills's book brilliant. By the way, S. Wallerstein is quite wrong about the book. Mills says relatively little about America in it – his focus is mostly on European thought. It is a great sadness to me that I am unable... -

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Individuals Declared Brain-Dead Remain Biologically Alive A remarkable experiment was reported last week in which a kidney from a genetically modified pig was attached to blood vessels in a brain-dead individual, with the family’s consent. In the study, hailed as “a huge breakthrough,” the pig’s kidney functioned normally, suggesting the future feasibility of successfully transplanting organs from pigs into human beings. This research raises a host of ethical issues, including the ethics of xenotransplantation. Here I focus on the implications for the status of... Hastings Bioethics -


Which Came First, Creative Practices or Imagination? Max Jones is a Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Bristol. He is particularly interested in the implications of embodied cognition, predictive processing, ecological psychology, and active perception for our understanding of how we think in more abstract ways (for example, mathematical thought), and has recently been working on embodied and enculturated approaches to the imagination. A post by Max Jones and Sam WilkinsonIn an earlier paper (Jones & Wilkinson 2020) and a previous... The Junkyard -


MILLS CONTINUES TO DELIGHT I continue to find every page of Charles Mills's book brilliant. By the way, S. Wallerstein is quite wrong about the book. Mills says relatively little about America in it – his focus is mostly on European thought. It is a great sadness to me that I am unable to tell Charles how much I am enjoying re-reading his book and how important I believe it is.  Students who stay with me through this course... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Ethical Dilemmas in the Pharmacy (Teaching on TikTok) This video is of an ethical dilemma posed by a Pharmacy student and illustrates the conflicts between respecting autonomy (by keeping medical information confidential) and nonmaleficence (protecting a friend). This is a story told to the professor by a student in a Pharmacy Ethics class he taught at the University of Mississippi. The student worked […] Blog of the APA -


Do Delusions Have and Give Meaning? Today's post is by Rosa Ritunnano (University of Birmingham and Melbourne), consultant psychiatrist and PhD candidate at the Institute for Mental Health, Birmingham, UK. Here she talks about a recent paper she co-authored with Lisa Bortolotti, “Do delusions have and give meaning?”, recently published in Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences (open access). Rosa RitunnanoFor many people living with psychosis, delusional experiences are hugely distressing. They are not only harmful because of the negative emotions they often carry along,... Imperfect Cognitions -


Risability Aristotle says that a necessary accident of the human being is risability—the capability for laughter. As far as I can tell, necessary accidents are supposed to derive from the essence of a thing. So, how do we derive risability from the essence of the human being? Here’s an idea. The essence is to be a rational animal. A rational being reflects on itself. But to have an animal that is simultaneously rational—that’s objectively funny. Thus,... Alexander Pruss -


Anarchism [Revised entry by Andrew Fiala on October 26, 2021. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Anarchism is a political theory that is skeptical of the justification of authority and power. Anarchism is usually grounded in moral claims about the importance of individual liberty, often conceived as freedom from domination. Anarchists also offer a positive theory of human flourishing, based upon an ideal of equality, community, and non-coercive consensus building. Anarchism has inspired practical efforts at establishing... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Philosophy of Well-Being: A “Dysfunctional” Situation? A “responsible definition of wellbeing,” says Anna Alexandrova (Cambridge), “needs to be appropriate to the goals of the project—epistemically accessible, reasonably simple, in other words fit for purpose… Philosophers of wellbeing in the analytic tradition think very differently.” That is from a discussion of the matter of “value aptness,” or “How can the science of wellbeing properly produce knowledge that is genuinely about well being?” Interviewer Richard Marshall had asked, “Why do you think your... Daily Nous -


Virtue Epistemology [Revised entry by John Turri, Mark Alfano, and John Greco on October 26, 2021. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Contemporary virtue epistemology (hereafter 'VE') is a diverse collection of approaches to epistemology. At least two central tendencies are discernible among the approaches. First, they view epistemology as a normative discipline. Second, they view intellectual agents and communities as the primary focus of epistemic evaluation, with a focus on the intellectual virtues and vices embodied in... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Attention [Revised entry by Christopher Mole on October 26, 2021. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Attention is involved in the selective directedness of our mental lives. The nature of this selectivity is one of the principal points of disagreement between the extant theories of attention. Some of the most influential theories treat the selectivity of attention as resulting from limitations in the brain's capacity to process the complex properties of multiple perceivable stimuli. Other theories take... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


New Article: James McCune Smith and Glasgow: A Scholar’s Transatlantic Journey, 1821-1837 Illustration of James McCune Smith from “Builders of History and Civilization: Pfeiffer Presents Dr. James McCune Smith, Physician and Scholar, 1813-1864.” Detroit Tribune, 9 March 1940. Dear friends of Ordinary Philosophy: My scribbling away continues! I’ve just written an article for the University of Glasgow’s Beniba Centre for Slavery Studies. It discusses James McCune Smith’s early years as a scholar and his years at the University of Glasgow, where he earned his bachelor’s, master’s, and... Ordinary Philosophy -


The Question That Quine Refused To Answer. You can download and read or share a .pdf of the complete text of this essay HERE. The Question That Quine Refused To Answer In 1998, at The World Philosophy Congress in Boston, W.V.O. Quine, the leading  Analytic philosopher of the seciond half of the 20th century, was asked by a New York Times reporter: … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


A Theory of Human Dignity, #18–Pain and Suffering. TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction                                                                                                 II. Refuting the Dignity-Skeptic and Debunking a Dignity-Debunking Argument                                                                   III. The Metaphysics of Human Dignity III.1 What Human Dignity Is III.2 Real Persons and Minded Animals III.3 A Metaphysical Definition of Real Personhood IV. Nonideal Dignitarian Moral Theory IV.0 How Nonideal Can a World Be? IV.1 The Skinny … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


The Paradox of Suspense [Revised entry by Aaron Smuts on October 26, 2021. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The ultimate success of Hollywood blockbusters is dependent upon repeat viewings. Fans return to theaters to see films multiple times and buy DVDs so they can watch movies yet again. Although it is something of a received dogma in philosophy and psychology that suspense requires uncertainty, many of the biggest box office successes are action movies that fans claim to find... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Secession [Revised entry by Allen Buchanan and Elizabeth Levinson on October 26, 2021. Changes to: Main text, notes.html] Until fairly recently, secession has been a neglected topic among philosophers. Two factors may explain why philosophers have now begun to turn their attention to secession. First, in the past few decades there has been a great increase not only in the number of attempted secessions, but also in successful secessions, and philosophers may simply be reacting to... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Now Featured We are grateful to be able to share out latest symposium this week on James Woodward‘s new book, Causation With A Human Face. We also have fantastic commentators: Josh Knobe, Patricia Cheng, Christopher Hitchcock, Thomas Blanchard, and David Kinney, and Tania Lombrozo. You can read all of the posts here as they become available. The post Now Featured appeared first on The Brains Blog. Brains Blog -


Postcard from Rhodes Ancient Kamiros A week on Rhodes, in stunning October weather, to stay with the Digital Nomad Daughter. Our first time travelling abroad since the pandemic struck. We seem to have survived the covid festival at the airport (we didn’t think our fellow travellers’ mask game was exactly optimal), and fingers crossed for the return. But here seems safer than at home. Of course being with family again is terrific; and Rhodes is a delight in... Logic Matters -


A Network for Scholars Researching Women Philosophers in the History of Philosophy The Center for the History of Women Philosophers and Scientists at Paderborn University is has created a network for scholars who work on women in the history of philosophy. Called “New Voices on Women in the History of Philosophy,” the project “intends to interconnect and further the work of scholars in the field of Women Philosophers in the History of Philosophy.” It is organized by Clara Carus (Paderborn). New Voices hosts talks, and a new... Daily Nous -


Mini-Heap New additions to the Heap of Links… “In recent months, and for the first time, I’ve been embarrassed to be a philosopher… Philosophy has a problem and that problem is hubris” — says Stephen Mumford (Durham). Can you guess what prompted this? Nicholas Cage as various philosophers — from Hane Maung (Manchester) “The philosopher has to be the bad conscience of his age” — Richard Marshall interviews Friedrich Nietzsche at 3:16AM “Collaborations with scientists can suffer when the... Daily Nous -


Vedanta and Cybernetics  It’s not surprising that some scholars of Vedanta forget that the mind is inert (jada) or unconscious by nature and only ‘thinks as it were’ (Brh.Up.) due to its pervasion or transfusion by pure consciousness.  The mind then is material interacting with other material entities and objects.  Epiphenomenalism and the causal problem are not a topic in advaita per se and they arise only as controversion.  Why those scholiasts forget the jada nature is probably... Ombhurbhuva -