Traditions

Eleven Theses on…

With this text we want to salute an absolutely arbitrary event in the life of one of the most important thinkers in today’s world. The event is his 70th birthday. Almost everyone will immediately recognize the thinker we want to celebrate, when we — as if this were philosophical Jeopardy — offer a number of highly subjective descriptions or “theses” of what makes him and his work worth such a eulogy: ¶ 1– He might be one of the very few thinkers in the history of philosophy, who at points makes it, even for his closest theoretico-political companions, almost impossible not to feel irritated or chagrined by some of the positions and claims he defends or (un-)strategic choices he has made. Depending on one’s temper, these sentiments are produced quickly or rather late. But one can rest assured that one will come to such a point. ¶ 2– This practical effect of his work is systematically reflected in his thinking. And this does not simply mean that he is a polemical figure, a figure of practico-theoretical polemos who simply enjoys the provocation (even though he sometimes seems to do so). Rather, this feature of his thought-practice is part and parcel of a refined elaboration of the concept of negativity and this also means, in more colloquial terms, of resistance. This is to say that his conceptualizations of negativity often provoke a negative relation to the conceptualized subject matter as its necessary ramification. ¶ 3– The preceding thesis comes with... -

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Summary of Socrates’ Teachings

A marble head of Socrates in the Louvre © Darrell Arnold Ph.D.– (Excerpt reprinted with permission.) https://darrellarnold.com/2018/09/21/socrates_1/ ¶ Socrates’ biography ¶ Socrates was of humble roots. In Nietzsche’s eyes: He was born of the rabble. His father was a stonemason, his mother was a midwife. As a young man, he is thought to have studied Greek natural philosophy. But he found the views of the natural philosophers too obscure and unsubstantiated. He thus, like the sophists, turned against natural philosophy to questions of morality and justice. ¶ In Athens, he lived a life of simple means, married Xanthippe, with whom he had three children. He fought, evidently heroically, in the Peloponnesian war against Sparta. He was known in Athens for gathering and speaking in... -

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Coming Soon: A Hundred Cyborgs Returns

There's been a hiatus on A Hundred Cyborgs while I've been working on the Kickstarter and GDC trip for our new games developer, which has completely dominated the last few months. However, I hope to get back to the cyberethics serial in April or thereabouts. I already have a few... -

Read More @ Only a Game
New Ethics Research Center Opening in Cameroon

The Ethics and Public Policy Laboratory (EthicsLab) is a new research center at the Catholic University of Central Africa that is officially launching this week.  ¶ Located in Yaoundé, the capital of Cameroon, EthicsLab aims to provide “high quality research in the domain of fundamental and applied ethics in the sub-region of... -

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Elizabeth Anscombe at 100   Today marks the centenary of one of the truly great minds of the twentieth century: Elizabeth Anscombe.  This mother of seven, and wife of philosopher Peter Geach, authored some of the most influential papers in analytic philosophy; she made groundbreaking contributions to moral philosophy, action theory, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, and the history of philosophy. Happy Anscombe day, everyone!  To celebrate, I am posting a few recent lectures of mine on her... Virtue Blog -


MANCEPT Workshops in Political Theory 2019, Panel on Political Theory beyond the State Contemporary political philosophy is centrally concerned with the Westphalian-Weberian state. For instance, the large number and variety of theories of justice prevalent in the discipline often are theories about what the state ought to do or indeed not to do. … Continue reading → Public Reason -


Eleven Theses on… With this text we want to salute an absolutely arbitrary event in the life of one of the most important thinkers in today’s world. The event is his 70th birthday. Almost everyone will immediately recognize the thinker we want to celebrate, when we — as if this were philosophical Jeopardy — offer a number of highly subjective descriptions or “theses” of what makes him and his work worth such a eulogy: 1– He might be... The Philosophical Salon -


Coming Soon: A Hundred Cyborgs Returns There's been a hiatus on A Hundred Cyborgs while I've been working on the Kickstarter and GDC trip for our new games developer, which has completely dominated the last few months. However, I hope to get back to the cyberethics serial in April or thereabouts. I already have a few pieces drafted, but I have not had the time to do any serious blogging this year as of yet. I'd like to reach #50 before Discordian... Only a Game -


New Ethics Research Center Opening in Cameroon The Ethics and Public Policy Laboratory (EthicsLab) is a new research center at the Catholic University of Central Africa that is officially launching this week.  Located in Yaoundé, the capital of Cameroon, EthicsLab aims to provide “high quality research in the domain of fundamental and applied ethics in the sub-region of central Africa.” From its website: By stimulating an ethical reflection on issues of economic, social, and political importance, our aim is both to build a culture of integrity and to... Daily Nous -


Confronting Philosophy’s Anti-Semitism Should we continue to teach thinkers like Kant, Voltaire and Hume without mention of the harmful prejudices they helped legitimize? The Stone -


All About Habermas. In this occasional disquisition on the many things philosophers are not known for we come to another of the Frankfurt school, Jürgen Habermas. This is likely to be a large entry into the annals, since Habermas was not known for almost everything, certainly including: nanotechnology and the prophets of doom breeding Manx cats crimes of … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


Summary of Socrates’ Teachings A marble head of Socrates in the Louvre © Darrell Arnold Ph.D.– (Excerpt reprinted with permission.) https://darrellarnold.com/2018/09/21/socrates_1/ Socrates’ biography Socrates was of humble roots. In Nietzsche’s eyes: He was born of the rabble. His father was a stonemason, his mother was a midwife. As a young man, he is thought to have studied Greek natural philosophy. But he found the views of the natural philosophers too obscure and unsubstantiated. He thus, like the sophists, turned... Reason and Meaning -


Spring Break Movie Adventure: Mini-Reviews of Captain Marvel, Alita: Battle Angel, Glass, and More! Today is the last day of my spring break for 2019.  I didn't go to the beach or leave the country, but I did see a lot of movies in what I called my Spring Break Movie Adventure.  In the last week I've seen the following either in theaters or at home: Captain Marvel, Alita: Battle Angel, Glass, Sorry to Bother You, Hellraiser: Judgment, Bird Box, The Hidden Fortress, and Train to Busan.  Onward to the... Examined Worlds -


Deleuze's Bergsonism 2019.03.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Craig Lundy, Deleuze's Bergsonism, Edinburgh University Press, 2018, 182pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781474414319. Reviewed by Keith Ansell-Pearson, University of Warwick A notable feature of Gilles Deleuze's philosophy is the way in which it extensively draws on the ideas of Bergson. Deleuze first began to write on Bergson in the 1950s, a time when Bergson's intellectual ascendancy in Europe and even America had well and... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Dick Dale: godfather of surf guitar Obituary in The Guardian. Dale was pivotal in the development of the Fender Stratocaster guitar. Dick DaleguitarMisirlousurf music Man Without Qualities -


JOHN W. CAMPBELL’S QUARTER TURN: √-1, cognition and estrangement (2) Perhaps unsurprisingly, Laruelle’s « quarter turn » has its precedent in science fiction. In his recently published book « ASTOUNDING: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction » Alec Nevala-Lee notes: The September 1971 issue featured the short story “On the Nature of Angels,” the last piece of fiction that he ever wrote. Campbell proposed that the soul was a complex number in which the variable b stood... Agent Swarm -


PEA Soup Quarterly Topic Awards: “Applied Ethics April” We are pleased to announce the new PEA Soup Quarterly Topic Awards!! Every third month, from here on out, we will invite submissions from any of our readers for posts on the Soup about a particular topic in moral and political philosophy. We will kick this off next month with “Applied Ethics April”! We invite you to submit posts of no more than 1000 words, on any topic in applied ethics, to David Shoemaker and... PEA Soup -


Top of the Mornin' to ya (Get up the Yard) (repost for the day that's init)Plan to move St.Patrick's Day. American and Australian papers please copy:There used to be the ethnic slur which only Irish people used against each other - ‘that’s very Irish’ meaning that it was perfectly ridiculous but true in an interesting way. Theo Dorgan’s (poet, broadcaster) proposal to move St. Patrick’s day to the Summer time when the weather might be better enters into that category.It occupies a niche in an... Ombhurbhuva -


LARUELLE’S QUARTER TURN: √-1, cognition and estrangement One may find that philosophy taken as a whole is boring, tedious, monotonous, repetitive and lacking in creative intensity, with only a few exceptions. Even the exceptional cases (books, systems, concepts) can come to be banalised by their own creators, as they recite and organise their ideas over repeated use. Sometimes our own productions seem to be second hand copies of our few moments of learning or of inspiration. Despite a sometimes euphoric rhetoric of... Agent Swarm -


Hail Glorious St Patrick – a history of Irish Nationalism At some point today somewhere on Irish radio, “Hail Glorious St Patrick” will be played. A traditional staple for St Patrick’s day written by a woman, Sr Agnes, this hymn not only praises Patrick and asks for his help for the “poor children” of Ireland, but also praises Ireland itself. Written in the early 19th century, it closes with the assertion that “And our hearts shall yet burn, wherever we roam, For God and Saint... Irish Philosophy -


Republic of Equals: Further Reviews in 2019 Gabriel Monette, Philosophiques, vol 45, no. 2, autumn 2018, p. 343 https://www.erudit.org/fr/revues/philoso/2018-v45-n2-philoso04206/1055279ar/?fbclid=IwAR0_elFAGkrdQ-OP2EEAuk3YMM4wi97E-YOsVsxV3J7R–i_VWuq8te5n4g “Cet ouvrage ambitieux et érudit de la plume du philosophe britannique Alan Thomas est une contribution significative à la recherche sur le libéralisme, et plus généralement à la philosophie de l’économie”…”C’est un projet ambitieux qui pose des questions importantes sur les institutions économiques de nos sociétés au regard de nos principes de justice. L’auteur déploie une connaissance encyclopédique de la littérature et des... Ethicssocialphilosophy -


COMMENTING ON THE COMMENTS, AKA NOT HAVING ANTHING TO SAY TODAY I have read with interest and some amusement the series of comments triggered by my remark about Paul Krugman.  I was particularly struck by one of Chris's observations, both because I think it is absolutely correct and because I do not recall having seen anyone else make it.  It is something that first crossed my mind a long time ago.  Here is what Chris wrote:"Chomsky is a genius yes, but you know as well as... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Daniel Patrick Moynihan: A polymath in a profession of intellectual pygmies Born on this day. Compare this man with the vulgar regressive shysters and shit-puppet morons who populate politics these days. Below is The Economist‘s deliciously scathing obituary. A POLYMATH in a profession of intellectual pygmies; a free thinker in a world of crushing orthodoxies; and a cheerful imbiber in a country that has turned, once again,… Man Without Qualities -


In Epoché, Stephen Hoffman looks back in Parallax. It’s not quite accurate to say that Ulysses is a book about language. It “is” language — and not just a minute portion of it enclosed between the covers of one, albeit brimming, book. Rather it is “the thing itself” in its entirety, language in what Heidegger called the “second beginning” (anderer Anfang). The “first beginning” (der erste Anfang) was Heidegger’s name for the first stab of unadulterated wonder... Enowning -