Traditions

HAIL AND FAREWELL

Eighteen years ago, in the early months of 2004, Susie and I paid off the mortgage on the house we had built for us when we married in 1987.  Feeling flush with cash, we made two big expenditures.  First, I bought for myself a brand-new flashy Toyota Camry with all the bells and whistles – power doors, power windows, power seats, and cruise control. Then Susie and I bought a tiny 330 square foot apartment on the left bank of Paris just outside Place Maubert.  I was a young, vigorous 70-year-old running the doctoral program in Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts.   For all the years since, we have been going to that Paris pied-ä-terre several times a year, renting it out when we could to cover the costs of owning it. It was there that I spent four weeks learning the viola part of Beethoven’s Opus 59 #3, the third Razumovsky quartet. It was while sitting in a café in Place de la Bastille that I wrote my paper “the Future of Socialism.” In 2010, in the courtyard outside our apartment, I threw a glorious 80th birthday party for my big sister Barbara. And for years each morning when I was in Paris I would take a long walk through the fourth, fifth, or sixth arrondissement, watching the city awaken.   Well, I am no longer young and vigorous  but old and creaky and much slowed down by my Parkinson’s disease. My Camry too is showing... -

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THE HORDE OF THE COUNTERWIND (2): Title and Epigraph

Continuing to live-blog my reading of LA HORDE DU CONTREVENT (2004) by Alain Damasio ¶ TITLE ¶ The title THE HORDE OF THE COUNTERWIND is Deleuzo-Guattarian. ¶ Deleuze and Guattari sketch in A THOUSAND PLATEAUS an ontology of multiplicities (« horde ») and their relation to the intensive fluxes of the outside (often figured as « winds »). ¶ « Counter- » is a prefix that is used by them in A THOUSAND PLATEAUS to indicate something that is both against (negative face) and outside (positive face) the codes., for example they speak of a « counter-oedipal apparatus », « countersignifying semiotics ». ¶ For some reason Alexander Dickow has chosen to translate the title « The Horde of Counterwind », with no definite article before « Counterwind ». However in the novel « counterwind » is a countable noun,... -

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Process Theism

[Revised entry by Donald Viney on June 4, 2022. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Process theism typically refers to a family of theological ideas originating in, inspired by, or in agreement with the metaphysical orientation of the English philosopher-mathematician Alfred North Whitehead (1861 - 1947) and the American philosopher-ornithologist Charles... -

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Renaissance Skepticism

Renaissance Skepticism The term “Renaissance skepticism” refers to a diverse range of approaches to the problem of knowledge that were inspired by the revitalization of Ancient Greek Skepticism in fifteenth through sixteenth century Europe. Much like its ancient counterpart, Renaissance skepticism refers to a wide array of epistemological positions rather... -

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Process Theism [Revised entry by Donald Viney on June 4, 2022. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Process theism typically refers to a family of theological ideas originating in, inspired by, or in agreement with the metaphysical orientation of the English philosopher-mathematician Alfred North Whitehead (1861 - 1947) and the American philosopher-ornithologist Charles Hartshorne (1897 - 2000). For both Whitehead and Hartshorne, it is an essential attribute of God to be fully involved in and affected by temporal... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Gilles Deleuze [Revised entry by Daniel Smith, John Protevi, and Daniela Voss on June 3, 2022. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Gilles Deleuze (January 18, 1925 - November 4, 1995) was one of the most influential and prolific French philosophers of the second half of the twentieth century. Deleuze conceived of philosophy as the production of concepts, and he characterized himself as a "pure metaphysician." In his magnum opus Difference and Repetition, he tries to develop a... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Renaissance Skepticism Renaissance Skepticism The term “Renaissance skepticism” refers to a diverse range of approaches to the problem of knowledge that were inspired by the revitalization of Ancient Greek Skepticism in fifteenth through sixteenth century Europe. Much like its ancient counterpart, Renaissance skepticism refers to a wide array of epistemological positions rather than a single doctrine or … Continue reading Renaissance Skepticism → Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


The Death of Democracy © Darrell Arnold Ph.D.– (Reprinted with Permission) http://darrellarnold.com/2018/07/12/how-democracies-die/ We all know of democratic institutions that have ended by revolution or coup. Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt, two professors of government at Harvard University, highlight another way that they increasingly end — through a slow erosion of institutions by those who were democratically elected to oversee them. In How Democracies Die the authors apply their knowledge of the collapse of democratic institutions from Europe and Latin America... Reason and Meaning -


Theories of the Common Law of Torts [New Entry by Arthur Ripstein on June 2, 2022.] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by Arthur Ripstein replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous authors.] Tort is a branch of private law. It focuses on interpersonal... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Eugenics [Revised entry by Inmaculada de Melo-Martin and Sara Goering on June 2, 2022. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] "Eugenics" is a term loaded with historical significance and a strong negative valence. Its literal meaning - good birth - suggests a suitable goal for all prospective parents, yet its historical connotations tie it to appalling policies, including forced sterilizations, selective breeding programs in North America and Asia, and horrifying concentration camps and mass exterminations in Nazi... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Rethinking the Moral Status Debate On what grounds should we deem an entity worthy of personhood and all the moral and legal considerations that come with it? The post Rethinking the Moral Status Debate appeared first on The Prindle Post. The Prindle Post -


HAIL AND FAREWELL Eighteen years ago, in the early months of 2004, Susie and I paid off the mortgage on the house we had built for us when we married in 1987.  Feeling flush with cash, we made two big expenditures.  First, I bought for myself a brand-new flashy Toyota Camry with all the bells and whistles – power doors, power windows, power seats, and cruise control. Then Susie and I bought a tiny 330 square foot apartment... The Philosopher’s Stone -


THE HORDE OF THE COUNTERWIND (2): Title and Epigraph Continuing to live-blog my reading of LA HORDE DU CONTREVENT (2004) by Alain Damasio TITLE The title THE HORDE OF THE COUNTERWIND is Deleuzo-Guattarian. Deleuze and Guattari sketch in A THOUSAND PLATEAUS an ontology of multiplicities (« horde ») and their relation to the intensive fluxes of the outside (often figured as « winds »). « Counter- » is a prefix that is used by them in A THOUSAND PLATEAUS to indicate something that is both against (negative face) and outside... Agent Swarm -


Philosophy Talk at Marmara: Assoc. Prof. Yaylagül Ceran Karataş on “What Happened to Human Being: New Perspectives/Questions on Philosophical Anthropology” (07.06.2022) Via Zoom Assoc. Prof. Yaylagül Ceran Karataş (Istanbul Medeniyet University) will give a talk at Marmara on Tuesday. All are welcome. Date: Tuesday June 7, 2022 Time: 18:00 – 20:00 (Istanbul Time) To attend the event please send an e-mail to marmara.phil.talks@gmail.com “What Happened to Human Being: New Perspectives/Questions on Philosophical Anthropology“ About The Speaker: Yaylagül Ceran Karataş graduated from Istanbul University, Department of Philosophy in 1999. She has two master degree. First one was at the Istanbul... Hesperous is Bosperous -


THE HORDE OF THE COUNTERWIND (1): SF ANEMOLOGY THE HORDE OF THE COUNTERWIND is a cult epic-length French science fiction novel published in 2004, written by Alain Damasio. The novel combines elements of science fiction, fantasy, and philosophy to recount a mythic journey by a « horde » of absolutely dedicated members to find the ultimate origin point of the devastating winds that traverse their planet, making it almost completely uninhabitable, to understand and perhaps even to put an end to the deadly Wind that... Agent Swarm -


Two Short Kings: The Colorado Kid and Cycle of the Werewolf by Stephen King  In my perhaps ill-advised and loosely-resolved quest to read all of Stephen King's books, I have come to two shorter ones published over 20 years apart (2005 and 1983). I figured I would review them together on the blog. So here are The Colorado Kid and Cycle of the Werewolf!The Colorado KidI don't know how Stephen King does it, but he took a story of two folksy small town newspaper reporters telling a 25-year-old story... Examined Worlds -


A RESPONSE TO ERIC Eric, in response to my post about Raymond Geuss’s book, writes the following:   Geuss in describing his take on Prof Wolff's In Defense of Anarchism put into words what I have been feeling:"The real question for me was, 'Why be so daft as to start from this quasi-Kantian conception of 'individual autonomy' at all? If you do start from that assumption, you have no one but yourself to blame if you end up nowhere.' Wolff, I... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Abhidharma [Revised entry by Noa Ronkin on June 1, 2022. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] The first centuries after Śākyamuni Buddha's death saw the rise of multiple schools of thought and teacher lineages within the Buddhist community as it spread throughout the Indian subcontinent. These new forms of scholarly monastic communities had distinct theoretical and practical interests and, in their efforts to organize, interpret, and reexamine the Buddha's scattered teachings, they developed a particular system... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Roe, Abortion, and the Right to Ourselves When I joined a protest the day after the leak of Samuel Alito’s draft opinion overturning Roe, rage overwhelmed me. My rage was not for the end of Roe—which I’d known was coming—but, oddly, at the protest: the same people, the same signs, the same chants. As the mother of a friend, marching alongside us, […] Blog of the APA -


Soviet atrocities in Ukraine, 1941 In light of the horrific information now available about atrocities committed in Ukraine by occupying Russian forces in towns such as Bucha -- rape, torture, summary execution, as well as mass deportations to "filtration camps" -- it is grimly important to recognize that there was a prior period of fantastic brutality and atrocity committed by Russians against Ukraine over eighty years ago. The NKVD -- the secret police of the Soviet Union and Stalin's reliable... Understanding Society -


Graduate Student Reflection Series: On Being A Luddite I was born into a world of burgeoning technology, but I don’t particularly enjoy using it. So when I began teaching, it felt natural to avoid technology use during class. I also asked that my students refrain from using their laptops or tablets during class, and provided a printed handout or diagram to accompany the […] Blog of the APA -


Conjuring History: A Master of Djinn by P. Djèlí Clark  Great stuff! Interesting, surprisingly deep, and above all: fun!This novel (Clark's first full novel) is set in the same universe as several short stories and at least one novella (The Haunting of Tram Car 015). In an alternate history of the early 20th century, djinn and other magical creatures have come into our world from elsewhere, centered on Cairo. We meet Fatma, an agent for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments, and Supernatural Entities. We also meet... Examined Worlds -


Essays in Ancient Epistemology 2022.05.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gail Fine, Essays in Ancient Epistemology, Oxford University Press, 2021, 417pp., $105.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198746768. Reviewed by Lloyd P. Gerson, University of Toronto The present volume collects 13 previously published papers in ancient epistemology, written over the last 20 years or so. Seven of the papers are on Plato’s dialogues, two are on Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics, and four are mainly on Sextus Empiricus and... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Supertasks [Revised entry by JB Manchak and Bryan W. Roberts on May 31, 2022. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A supertask is a task that consists in infinitely many component steps, but which in some sense is completed in a finite amount of time. Supertasks were studied by the pre-Socratics and continue to be objects of interest to modern philosophers, logicians and physicists. The term "super-task" itself was coined by J.F. Thomson (1954).... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -