Traditions

Kierkegaard and MacDonald on Genuine Community

I recently discovered a thinker whose views are very similar to Kierkegaard’s and that has given me an opportunity to share once again my thoughts on Kierkegaard’s views on the nature of genuine community. Kierkegaard famously disparages what he refers to as “the crowd” and its “leveling” tendencies, but that does not mean he had a negative view of all collectivities. He makes very few references to positive collectivities, but that was likely first because he felt they were exceptionally rare, and second, and more importantly, because he felt describing such collectivities wasn’t his specific life’s task. His task, as he conceived it, was to encourage people to separate from the crowd, to become individuals. ¶ Christianity, writes Kierkegaard in Works of Love, turns our attention completely away from the external, turns it inward (WOL, 376). In the stillness of God’s house, he writes in Three Discourses on Imagined Occasions, “[t]here is no fellowship—each one is by himself; there is no call for united effort—each one is called to individual responsibility” (TDIO, p. 10).  ¶ And yet, he continues later in the same work, “in the stillness, what beautiful harmony with everyone! Oh, in this solitude, what beautiful fellowship with everyone!” (TDIO, p. 38). ¶ It may appear that Kierkegaard is contradicting himself here, but I don’t think he is. I think what he means is that in the stillness before God, there is no “fellowship” in the sense that there is no escaping into the crowd, no hiding... -

Read More @ Piety on Kierkegaard

A Few Points of Philosophical Interest Learned by Watching Our Cats: Part II

If cats are conscious but not self-conscious—that is, if they do not split experience in two and constitute an inner self which stands at one remove from all other perceptions—they show us how much we overestimate the importance of self-awareness and subjectivity. They are extraordinarily varied in personality and habits; Leo and Oliver are littermates and have never been apart. Yet their preferences are as different as their markings, and though both are very affectionate their ways of seeking attention and responding to it are so different that one might think they were of two different species. ZouZou, the cat in the picture, who died a year or so before Leo and Oliver were born, was obsessed with a toy fashioned of a plexiglass... -

Read More @ The Philosophical Salon
Philosopher Melissa Jacquart Awarded a Whiting Programs Fellowship

The Whiting Foundation has just announced that they will be awarding six $50,000 Fellowships and five $10,000 Seed Grants to a vibrant cross-section of public-humanities collaborations. We are pleased to announce that the APA’s nominee Dr. Melissa Jacquart (University of Cincinnati) has been awarded one of the $50,000 Fellowships for... -

Read More @ Blog of the APA
RHIZOME (3): The Missing Paragraph Part 2 – Against Discussion

In this video I continue my discussion of the original version of Deleuze and Guattari’s RHIZOME, which was their third collaboration (after ANTI-OEDIPUS and KAFKA). ¶ RHIZOME was published as a separate book in French in 1976, four years before its publication, in revised form, in MILLE PLATEAUX (... -

Read More @ Agent Swarm

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Philosopher Melissa Jacquart Awarded a Whiting Programs Fellowship The Whiting Foundation has just announced that they will be awarding six $50,000 Fellowships and five $10,000 Seed Grants to a vibrant cross-section of public-humanities collaborations. We are pleased to announce that the APA’s nominee Dr. Melissa Jacquart (University of Cincinnati) has been awarded one of the $50,000 Fellowships for her project, Bringing Philosophy to […] Blog of the APA -


Kierkegaard and MacDonald on Genuine Community I recently discovered a thinker whose views are very similar to Kierkegaard’s and that has given me an opportunity to share once again my thoughts on Kierkegaard’s views on the nature of genuine community. Kierkegaard famously disparages what he refers to as “the crowd” and its “leveling” tendencies, but that does not mean he had a negative view of all collectivities. He makes very few references to positive collectivities, but that was likely first because... Piety on Kierkegaard -


Žižek on Ukraine   HERE. I largely agree with this piece. In intellectual life we spend a lot of time dumping on narrow-minded, Über-patriotic, provincial and uneducated aggressors. I do it too, yielding to no one in my contempt for the cheaply anti-intellectual cult of racist and pseudo-masculine bullies that makes up a large part of support for Trump in this country. In my view they are a plague on us all, and still pose a grave danger. That... Object Oriented Philosophy -


Wilhelm von Humboldt [Revised entry by Kurt Mueller-Vollmer and Markus Messling on May 24, 2022. Changes to: Bibliography] Wilhelm (Friedrich Wilhelm Christian Karl Ferdinand) von Humboldt, German man of letters extraordinary, close friend of the poets Goethe and Schiller, whose life's work encompasses the areas of philosophy, literature, linguistics, anthropology, education, and political thought as well statesmanship was born in Potsdam on June 22, 1767 and died at Tegel near Berlin on April 8, 1835. Although there has... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


APOLOGIA PRO VITA SUA I have taught countlessly many works of philosophy, politics, sociology, economics, history, literature, and Afro-American studies since I earned my doctorate 65 years ago, but in that long time I have only engaged deeply, seriously, in a sustained fashion with four works: David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature, Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason, Kant’s Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, and Karl Marx’s Capital. As I have explained in some of my YouTube... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Professor Chantal Delsol on Reversion to Paganism It used to be said that the bad things that were happening in the world were due to its being on the cusp of the Kali Yuga. The Kali Yuga is the iron age of mechanism, materialism and lack of religion and dharma generally. I think we have a long way to go before a cusp is reached. Prof. Chantal Delsol concurs. Her central point in this essay and youtube talk is that Christendom has... Ombhurbhuva -


RHIZOME the missing paragraph – text and translation (ii) This post contains a translation of the second half of the « missing » paragraph of RHIZOME (first published in 1976 as a separate book). For the French text see below. TRANSLATION It is curious how the objections people make are retardants. When you are trying to swim in a river people attach balls and chains to your ankles: have you thought of this? what do you make of that? are you really coherent? don’t... Agent Swarm -


RHIZOME (3): The Missing Paragraph Part 2 – Against Discussion In this video I continue my discussion of the original version of Deleuze and Guattari’s RHIZOME, which was their third collaboration (after ANTI-OEDIPUS and KAFKA). RHIZOME was published as a separate book in French in 1976, four years before its publication, in revised form, in MILLE PLATEAUX ( in 1980). Here, I consider the second half of a paragraph that was omitted in the later version. I discuss Deleuze and Guattari’s arguments against the hegemony... Agent Swarm -


The hollow universe of modern physics To say that the material world alone exists is not terribly informative unless we have some account of what matter is.  Those who are most tempted to materialism are also inclined to answer that matter is whatever physics says it is.  The trouble with that is that physics tells us less than meets the eye about the nature of matter.  As Poincaré, Duhem, Russell, Eddington, and other late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century philosophers and scientists... Edward Feser -


New: Journal of Social and Political Philosophy The Journal of Social and Political Philosophy (JSPP) is a new peer-reviewed journal that aims to serve as a “forum in which to address the new challenges facing social and political thought in the twenty-first century.” The result of an initiative by the School of Philosophy at Wuhan University and published by Edinburgh University Press, JSPP is the first English language academic journal of social and political philosophy based in China. The journal is edited by... Daily Nous -


Plato’s Myths [Revised entry by Catalin Partenie on May 24, 2022. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] What the ancient Greeks - at least in the archaic phase of their civilization - called muthos was quite different from what we and the media nowadays call "myth". For them a muthos was a true story, a story that unveils the true origin of the world and human beings. For us a myth is something to be "debunked": a widespread,... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Ballantyne from Fordham to Arizona State Nathan Ballantyne, currently associate professor of philosophy at Fordham University, will be moving Arizona State University (ASU), where he will be associate professor of Philosophy, Cognition, and Culture in the university’s School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies. Dr. Ballantyne works on several topics in epistemology concerning human judgment and inquiry. He is the author of the book, Knowing Our Limits, and several articles, which you can browse here and here. He takes up his... Daily Nous -


Skipper and Vassend to Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer Mattias Skipper, currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National University of Singapore, and Olav B. Vassend, currently an Assistant Professor at Nanyang Technological University, are both moving to the Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (Lillehammer). Mattias Skipper and Olav Vassend Dr. Skipper specializes in epistemology, philosophy of logic, philosophy of language, and philosophical psychology. You can check out his research here. Dr. Vassend specializes in formal epistemology, philosophy of science, philosophy of statistics, and decision theory.... Daily Nous -


How to become a dictator Everyone should read the newest book by the French neuropsychiatrist Boris Cyrulnik. Recently, I saw an interview on the French TV in which Cyrulnik talked about his book and although I had something else to do, I couldn’t stop watching till the program had ended. The book is basically about inner freedom and voluntary servitude. This duality and the way you develop into one direction or the other makes that the book is about how... Philosophy by the Way -


A Few Points of Philosophical Interest Learned by Watching Our Cats: Part II If cats are conscious but not self-conscious—that is, if they do not split experience in two and constitute an inner self which stands at one remove from all other perceptions—they show us how much we overestimate the importance of self-awareness and subjectivity. They are extraordinarily varied in personality and habits; Leo and Oliver are littermates and have never been apart. Yet their preferences are as different as their markings, and though both are very affectionate... The Philosophical Salon -


“Rational Anthropology”: What’s in a Name? –Imagine a New Kind of Philosophy. ’Tis but thy name that is my enemy; Thou art thyself, though not a Montague. What’s Montague? it is nor hand, nor foot, Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part Belonging to a man. O, be some other name! What’s in a name? that which we call a rose By any other name would … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE FUTURE, #24–Po-Mo Architecture, Crises in Physics and Big Science, and The One-Two Punch. This book, THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE FUTURE: Uniscience and the Modern World, by Robert Hanna, presents and defends a critical philosophy of science and digital technology, and a new and prescient philosophy of nature and human thinking. It is being made available here in serial format, but you can also download and read or share … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


Eliminating and interpreting as Buddhists I want to turn now to what I think are the really interesting questions raised by Justin Whitaker’s latest post on the Sigālovāda Sutta. These are questions of hermeneutics, of method in interpretation. As noted, the previous post was exegetical: I think everything I say there could have been endorsed by a historically oriented religion scholar with no stake in Buddhist tradition. But Justin and I are not that: we are Buddhist theologians, who consider... The Indian Philosophy Blog -


Eliminating and interpreting as Buddhists I want to turn now to what I think are the really interesting questions raised by Justin Whitaker’s latest post on the Sigālovāda Sutta. These are questions of hermeneutics, of method in interpretation. As noted, the previous post was exegetical: I think everything I say there could have been endorsed by a historically oriented religion scholar with no stake in Buddhist tradition. But Justin and I are not that: we are Buddhist theologians, who consider... Love of All Wisdom -


TRANSLATIONS Thank you, Stephen Darling, for the accurate translation. Taking all in all, I think we can say that he finds me lame, silly, trifling, otiose, insignificant, uninteresting, trivial, simply not worth paying attention to.  Which calls to mind Pooh-Bah’s remark in The Mikado when he is handed a small bag of coins as a bribe: “another insult, and by the feel of it, a light one.”   I was never big in France. Now, Croatia,... The Philosopher’s Stone -