Traditions

SOME THOUGHTS ABOUT OLD AGE

Yesterday, one of the anonymati wrote with regard to my allusion to Socrates’ put down of Callicles, “You've repeated that bit about repetition many times.” I was curious, so I used Google’s powerful search facility and quickly discovered that I had indeed cited that passage a total of five times in eight years. That works out to roughly once every 585 days, which does not seem to me excessive, but it reminded me of a lovely old story that I heard during the years that I was living in Massachusetts. It seems that the wife of a nouveau riche businessman trying to make his way into the rarefied world of the Boston old Brahmans asked a Beacon Hill lady, “where do you buy your hats?” The lady looked down her nose at this upstart and responded, “we don’t buy our hats. We have our hats.”That got me thinking about my own clothes and I realized that like the uppercrust Boston lady, although not for the same reasons, I don’t buy my clothes, I have my clothes. It is years since I have bought a shirt or pair of pants and the only shoes I have bought in the last five or six years are the sneakers I wear on my morning walks. Indeed, I don’t even own a suit and the last time I wore a tie was when my son, Tobias, took me along as his guest to an Obama White House Christmas party. I no longer buy cars,... -

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New links for people interested in philosophy… ¶ What is meat? — Andy Lamey (UCSD) takes up the question, and why it matters, in the NYT A podcast/discussion series on consciousness — “Consciousness Live!”, created by Richard Brown (CUNY/LaGuardia), currently has over 40 episodes featuring philosophers, scientists, artists, and others The neoliberal case for a universal basic income — from Matt Zwolinski (San Diego) Sometimes, irrational beliefs deliver “significant epistemic benefits that could not be easily attained otherwise” — Lisa Bortolotti (Birmingham) and other philosophers on “epistemic innocence” Decolonizing political theory — a reading list compiled by David Owen (Southampton) “I think of myself as a very passionate and committed naturalist.” Also, regarding consciousness, “it’s the only thing.” — an interview with Galen Strawson (Texas) “Extreme economic inequality, whether it... -

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Operation Thunderbolt: Flight 139 and the Raid on Entebbe

44 years ago. Cracking read. EntebbeIsraelOperation Thunderbolt -

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5 Thoughts About “Liberal Hypocrites”

¶ Must liberals tolerate everything? Are they hypocrites if they don't? No. Of course not. In case that's not obvious, here are five things to think about.  ¶ Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). -

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SOME THOUGHTS ABOUT OLD AGE Yesterday, one of the anonymati wrote with regard to my allusion to Socrates’ put down of Callicles, “You've repeated that bit about repetition many times.” I was curious, so I used Google’s powerful search facility and quickly discovered that I had indeed cited that passage a total of five times in eight years. That works out to roughly once every 585 days, which does not seem to me excessive, but it reminded me of a... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Operation Thunderbolt: Flight 139 and the Raid on Entebbe 44 years ago. Cracking read. EntebbeIsraelOperation Thunderbolt Man Without Qualities -


Independence Day for Conflicted Americans Janelle Monáe and friends performing "Americans"Here's something I shared on social media: Spending part of July 3 bringing lunches to poor people in the projects and homeless people in tent cities in the wealthiest country on Earth in the middle of a grossly mismanaged response to a pandemic makes me really excited about Independence Day this year. (Just in case you missed it, yes, that is sarcasm.) Don’t get me wrong, I’m really, really glad to help,... Examined Worlds -


THE FATE OF ANALYSIS, #16–Naming Objects or Things, and Picturing Atomic Facts. TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction                                                                                                 II. Classical Analytic Philosophy                                                                II.1 What Classical Analytic Philosophy Is: Two Basic Theses                                           II.2 What Classical Analytic Philosophy Officially Isn’t: Its Conflicted Anti-Kantianism              II.3 Classical Analytic Philosophy Characterized in Simple, Subtler, and Subtlest Ways II.4 Three Kinds of Analysis: Decompositional, Transformative, and Conceptual                 II.5 Frege, The First … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


Finding Philosophy Below is the audio recording of Gary Watson’s John Dewey Lecture, given at the 2017-2018 Pacific Division Meeting. In his talk, “Finding Philosophy,” Watson introduces the listener to how he found his way from adolescent searching to the excitement of academia, where he could then develop the path on which he became a penetrating philosophical thinker. […] Blog of the APA -


A REPLY TO PAUL Paul writes: “Bob, I’ve seen you post this thought at least once, and maybe even twice before. I’ve got to ask you: what do you think are the practical implications of this analysis? Because I can’t see any, beyond not being misled into thinking everything would be great if it weren’t for America. I could easily see hawks and doves, neocons and internationalist socialists all accepting this analysis.”This comment raises two questions, the second of... The Philosopher’s Stone -


5 Thoughts About “Liberal Hypocrites” Must liberals tolerate everything? Are they hypocrites if they don't? No. Of course not. In case that's not obvious, here are five things to think about.  Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). Nick Byrd -


Mini-Heap New links for people interested in philosophy… What is meat? — Andy Lamey (UCSD) takes up the question, and why it matters, in the NYT A podcast/discussion series on consciousness — “Consciousness Live!”, created by Richard Brown (CUNY/LaGuardia), currently has over 40 episodes featuring philosophers, scientists, artists, and others The neoliberal case for a universal basic income — from Matt Zwolinski (San Diego) Sometimes, irrational beliefs deliver “significant epistemic benefits that could not be easily attained otherwise” — Lisa... Daily Nous -


Zeno’s Conscience: quotes (9) I was then so meek that now, when I’m tortured by remorse for not having loved him enough before he died, I always summon up that scene. To be sincere, I have to add that it was easy for me to submit to his arrangements because at that time I found the idea of being… Man Without Qualities -


Game Mechanics vs Player Practices Earlier this week, I waded in on an interesting discussion that broke out on Twitter about the use of the terms 'game mechanics' and 'game systems', definitely worth a read if you're into discussions around game terminology or have an interest in the history of game design. Here's an extract: And that's where and why it all goes wrong for everyone trying to 'fix' game mechanic as a term. Because both 'game mechanic' and 'game... Only a Game -


Who was Angelo Herndon? In a previous post I quoted Langston Hughes' 1938 poem "The Kids Who Die", which is very powerful in the context of our current crisis of police use of deadly force against black men. "Kids will die in the swamps of Mississippi / Organizing sharecroppers / Kids will die in the streets of Chicago / Organizing workers / Kids will die in the orange groves of California / Telling others to get together / Whites... Understanding Society -


New Translation of F. Laruelle’s “Progam” (A science for philosophy) F. Laruelle. “Programme.” La Décision philosophique 1 (1987): 5-43. Program translated by Taylor Adkins 7/2/20   A science for philosophy   Let’s suppose that we will formulate a project and that it will be necessary to exposit a program, this would be the manifesto: don’t do like philosophers, invent philosophy! Radically change its practice! Multiply its potentialities! Treat it experimentally as a whatever material! Is this possible? We are posing the problem otherwise: this is... Fractal Ontology -


deep adaptation as post-nihilist praxis? There is a long line of thinking and writing that frames ideological negation as emancipatory, or as an advancement of cognitive ability towards a more fluid interpretation of experience that, in turn, affords a wider range and flexibility of adaptive behavior. Dogma is for fools while pragmatic communication is the more useful game, we have been told. In the early 2000’s some friends and I played with the notion of a move towards post-nihilist thought,... Synthetic Zero -


Eliot Deutsch (1931-2020) Professor Eliot Deutsch, distinguished scholar of Indian philosophy, comparative philosophy, and aesthetics, has died. From an obituary by Roger Ames posted on the University of Hawai’i Department of Philosophy website. The life of Eliot Deutsch lies at the center of the comparative philosophy movement over the past two generations. In many ways, his biography is deeply embedded in a story he, in important measure, helped to write within the corridors of the Philosophy Department at... The Indian Philosophy Blog -


Call for Nominations Reminder: 2020 Prize for Excellence in Philosophy Teaching The nomination deadline for the APA’s 2020 Prize for Excellence in Philosophy Teaching is one month away. Don’t wait to submit your nomination! The Prize for Excellence in Philosophy Teaching, sponsored by the American Philosophical Association (APA), the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), and the Teaching Philosophy Association (TPA), recognizes a philosophy teacher who […] Blog of the APA -


SOME THOUGHTS PROMPTED BY TOM HICKEY'S COMMENT Tom Hickey’s lengthy and useful comments on this blog reminded me of the work of Hans Morgenthau, a famous political scientist whom I met at the University of Chicago when I was a young assistant professor there almost 60 years ago. Drawing on Morgenthau’s work, and taking into account Tom Hickey’s comments, let me say a few words about the international world order or lack of order as I see it.For all of recorded history,... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Monument as Chapel To state the obvious the original idea behind the erection of a monument was to commemorate someone who was held in high esteem by the committee that raised the funds to do it. That sense of commemoration may no longer apply or may be in contention. Taking away the monument does not make the history behind it not to have happened. For a populace that is largely ignorant of history the monument may be a... Ombhurbhuva -


What if We Could Have Meat Without Murder? We can, if we can agree that it doesn’t need to come from the body of an animal. The Stone -


Could Rhetoric in the USA Lead to Genocide? “Ten Stages of Genocide” was a document developed by Dr. Gregory H. Stanton, a professor at the University of Mary Washington. Stanton has served as the President of the International Association of Genocide Scholars, and now leads Genocide Watch, a non-profit organization dedicated to the fight against genocide. (“Ten Stages of Genocide” was originally published in 1996 as the “Eight Stages of Genocide,” and revised in 2013.) “Ten Stages of Genocide” is a formula for... Reason and Meaning -


The Contingent Nature of COVID-19 Temporality In an almost prophetic way, medical anthropologist Christos Lynteris published his book, Human Extinction and the Pandemic Imaginary, just a few months before the new coronavirus began spreading throughout the world. The final chapter of his book discusses the temporal aspect of post-pandemics. There, he begins by analyzing the social constructs of the ‘end’ and of what happens ‘after the end’ of a pandemic.  In his footsteps, we would like to further explore what type... The Philosophical Salon -