Science & Logic

The Many and the One, #1

As Louis MacNiece wrote, “World is crazier and more of it than we think, Incorrigbly plural.” Evidently, then, we need a plural logic! Or so say quite a few. And enough has been written on the topic for it to be time to pause to take stock. ¶ I have just now started reading Salvatore Florio and Øystein Linnebo’s The One and The Many: A Philosophical Study of Plural Logic, newly published by OUP with an open access arrangement which means that a PDF is free to download here. The book aims to take stock and explore the broader significance of plural logic for philosophy, logic, and linguistics. What can plural logic do for us? Are the bold claims made on its behalf correct? ¶ I’ll say straight away that Florio and Linnebo write very lucidly in an attractively readable style. Though it is not entirely clear, perhaps, who the intended reader is. The opening pages seem addressed to a pretty naive reader who e.g. may not even have heard of Cantor’s Theorem (p. 3); yet pretty soon the reader is presumed e.g. to understand talk of defining logical notions in terms of isomorphism invariance (p. 22). Again, if the reader really was new to the topic and had never seen before one of the now standard core logical languages for plural logic and its associated core deductive system, the initial brisk outline presentation (pp. 15-20) might perhaps be rather too brisk. But I’m certainly not going to nag... -

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Big Red Logic Books: now available in Australia!

Short version: paperbacks of An Introduction to Gödel’s Theorems,  An Introduction to Formal Logic, and Gödel Without (Too Many) Tears are now available from Amazon in Australia. ¶ Slightly longer version: An Australian version of Amazon’s KDP print-on-demand service has been up and running since the beginning of the year. Initially, however, it couldn’t handle books in the format of the Big Red Logic Books. But (though they haven’t told authors!) I have just discovered in the last hour that the books are now available locally. The prices are set to the minimum possible (the fixed printing and distribution charges are higher in Oz, but I’ve set the royalties to zero to compensate). ¶ So please spread the word Down Under. The books have been available... -

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¶ Random quoteAll animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.George Orwell (1903-1950) -

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Measuring rods

In his popular book on relativity theory, Einstein says that distance is just what measuring rods measure. I am having a hard time making sense of this in Einstein’s operationalist setting. ¶ Either Einstein is talking of real measuring rods or idealized ones. If real ones, then it’s false.... -

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The Many and the One, #1 As Louis MacNiece wrote, “World is crazier and more of it than we think, Incorrigbly plural.” Evidently, then, we need a plural logic! Or so say quite a few. And enough has been written on the topic for it to be time to pause to take stock. I have just now started reading Salvatore Florio and Øystein Linnebo’s The One and The Many: A Philosophical Study of Plural Logic, newly published by OUP with an... Logic Matters -


Random quoteAll animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.George Orwell (1903-1950) Philosophy by the Way -


Regularity and Inferential Theories of Causation [New Entry by Holger Andreas and Mario Guenther on July 27, 2021.] A cause is regularly followed by its effect. This idea is at the core of regularity theories of causation. The most influential regularity theory can be found in Hume (1739). The theory has been refined by Mill (1843) who insisted that the relevant regularities are laws of nature. Further refinements used to enjoy popularity until David Lewis (1973) criticized the regularity theory and... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Between Affinity and Expression: Kant, Nishida, and the Sensible Foundations of Expressivity, #5: Affinity, Sensibility and Expression. TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction II. Definitions III. Why Rethink Affinity? IV. Nishida and the Unity of Experience V. Affinity, Sensibility and Expression VI. Conclusion This is the fifth and final installment of this series, and contains sections V and VI. V. Affinity, Sensibility and Expression If “reflecting itself in itself” is the universal formula … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


Strange Philosophical Claims By Scientists Did you know that the brain cortex has “an amount of free will exceeding 96 terabytes per second”? No? Is it because… umm… you thought it was some other number of terabytes? [“Head Instructor” by Thomas Medicus]This claim is made in a recent paper published in Biosystems, “Quantum propensities in the brain cortex and free will” (ungated manuscript), by Danko D. Georgiev, an MD/PhD (pharmaceutical sciences) who writes about quantum information theory as applied to... Daily Nous -


Measuring rods In his popular book on relativity theory, Einstein says that distance is just what measuring rods measure. I am having a hard time making sense of this in Einstein’s operationalist setting. Either Einstein is talking of real measuring rods or idealized ones. If real ones, then it’s false. If I move a measuring rod from one location to another, its length changes, not for relativistic reasons, but simply because the acceleration causes some shock to... Alexander Pruss -


Italian Dark Ecology  Isn't that a beautiful cover?  Ecology Without Nature -


Is Objective List Theory "Spooky"? [I'm currently working on a new introduction to theories of welfare for utilitarianism.net, and am wondering whether to include the following.  Two big questions: Do you agree that "spookiness" worries seem like a common basis (especially amongst students / non-specialists) for rejecting objective list theories?  And if so, do you find the substantive discussion here to be helpful?]Resistance to objective list theories may sometimes stem from the sense that there is something metaphysically extravagant, disreputable,... Philosophy, et cetera -


Verifiability I’ve been reading Ayer’s Language, Truth and Logic, and been struck by how hard it is define verifiability, which is crucial since Ayer thinks that statements are meaningful if and only if they are verifiable or analytic (or, I suppose, denials of analytic statements, though oddly he doesn’t mention that possibility). Ayer rightly notes that we don’t want verifiability to mean conclusive verifiability. In the body of the text, he offers three criteria for the... Alexander Pruss -


The Classical Liberal Case for Israel Due this autumn.  classical liberalismIsraelJew hatredwalter blockZionism Man Without Qualities -


Ad Hoc Ad Hoc by Rachel Katler Other Daily Nous Comics / More Info about DN Comics Rachel Katler on Twitter Daily Nous -


Absolute and Relational Space and Motion: Post-Newtonian Theories [Revised entry by Nick Huggett, Carl Hoefer, and James Read on July 19, 2021. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, machs-bucket.jpg, notes.html] What is the nature of motion in physical theories and theorising, and is there any significance to the distinction between 'absolute' and 'relative' motion? In the companion article, on absolute and relational space and motion: classical theories, we discussed how such questions were addressed in the history of physics from Aristotle through to Newton... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Absolute and Relational Space and Motion: Classical Theories [New Entry by Carl Hoefer, Nick Huggett, and James Read on July 19, 2021.] Since antiquity, natural philosophers have struggled to comprehend the nature of three tightly interconnected concepts: space, time, and motion. A proper understanding of motion, in particular, has been seen to be crucial for deciding questions about the natures of space and time, and their interconnections. Since the time of Newton and Leibniz, philosophers' struggles to comprehend these concepts have often appeared... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Arizona WiNE Program Here. PEA Soup -


On the Meaning and Use of the Terms “Analytic Philosophy” and “Continental Philosophy.” You can also download and read or share a complete .pdf of this essay HERE. The term “Analytic philosophy” has six basic and closely related, but also non-trivially distinct, meanings: (i) prior to 1950, the tradition of late 19th century and early 20th century Anglo-Europeanphilosophy that presents and defines itself as essentially distinct from and … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


Between Affinity and Expression: Kant, Nishida, and the Sensible Foundations of Expressivity, #4: Nishida and the Unity of Experience. TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction II. Definitions III. Why Rethink Affinity? IV. Nishida and the Unity of Experience V. Affinity, Sensibility and Expression VI. Conclusion This is the fourth of five installments, and contains section IV. IV. Nishida and the Unity of Experience If there is a recurring theme that runs as a single thread … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


Down the rabbit hole … This Logic Matters site currently lives on Bluehost. But for various reasons, I’m in the middle of moving to a different hosting provider, Siteground: significantly more expensive (after the initial year’s discount) but by very many accounts also significantly better. Certainly, an experimental test version of the site runs there a lot faster, both on my iMac and even more so on an iPhone. As I’ve said before, the whole site could do with a... Logic Matters -


Beginning Mathematical Logic again I have uploaded a slightly revised version of Part I of the Study Guide, with just a few changes to the arm-waving chat and a couple of additions to the recommendations in the Computation/Arithmetic/Gödel’s Theorem chapter. You can download it here. I’m working away at Part II, mostly enjoying the (re)reading around. An earlier time-slice of myself might have persisted in reading the less fun books out of a misplaced sense of duty. Now I... Logic Matters -


Big Red Logic Books: now available in Australia! Short version: paperbacks of An Introduction to Gödel’s Theorems,  An Introduction to Formal Logic, and Gödel Without (Too Many) Tears are now available from Amazon in Australia. Slightly longer version: An Australian version of Amazon’s KDP print-on-demand service has been up and running since the beginning of the year. Initially, however, it couldn’t handle books in the format of the Big Red Logic Books. But (though they haven’t told authors!) I have just discovered in the... Logic Matters -


Forthcoming book: An Introduction to Proof Theory The next chapter of my Beginning Mathematical Logic: A Study Guide is announced as covering proof theory. I’ve been quietly bemoaning the fact that there hasn’t been a good, well-written, up-to-date introduction that can readily be recommended as a teach-yourself book at the right sort of level. So I thought I was going to have to put together a rather complicated set of suggestions (“read this chapter from this book, then look at those excerpts from... Logic Matters -