Science & Logic

IFL2: Quotation conventions

A small matter. But an intro logic book needs to have a policy on whether mentioned formulae get enclosed in quotation marks. IFL1 took a sternly conservative line on this, leading to somewhat unsightly rashes of quotation marks. I originally was going to carry this over to IFL2; but I have belatedly decided on a much more relaxed policy, which will be followed in future draft chapters (a policy more in keeping, indeed, with usual mathematical practice, which is a major plus). I was uncomfortable about the amount of quotational clutter in IFL1, and I was spurred on in part by some blunt remarks about not fussing over quotation in §9.1.2 of David Makinson’s Sets, Logic and Maths for Computing. ¶ Having made the decision, I was interested to check back to see what other intro textbooks said about quotation, use and mention. There were some real surprises. For example: My namesake Nick Smith, in his (in many ways excellent) Logic: The Laws of Truth, doesn’t use quotation marks round formulae. Fair enough — but he never discusses this decision: in fact in his long book, he rather oddly doesn’t talk about quotation conventions, use and mention at all. Likewise, Barker-Plummer, Barwise and Etchemendy in Language, Proof and Logic also do not use quotation marks around formulae — and the only sort of quotes they actually mention in the book are scare quotes. Greg Restall’s Logic an Introduction doesn’t use quotes either, and again doesn’t discuss the issue. He perhaps... -

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Assertions, Denials, Questions, Answers, and the Common Ground

Abstract: In this talk, I examine some of the interconnections between norms governing assertion, denial, questions and answers, and the common ground of a discourse. When we pay attention to the structure of norms governing polar (yes/no) questions, we can clarify the distinction between strong and weak denials, together with the parallel distinction between strong and weak assertion, and the way that these speech acts interact with the common ground. ¶ With those connections established, I respond to two criticisms of the program sketched out in my 2005 paper “Multiple Conclusions”. First, that understanding the upshot of a valid sequent X ⊢ Y as enjoining us to not assert each member of X and deny each member of Y is altogether too weak to... -

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The Limit of Responsibility: The Ethical Paradox of the Anthropocene

by Agostino Cera In this post I will try to describe the ethical paradox emerging within the framework of the so-called Anthropocene: the ‘new aspirant ... Read more... -

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Assertions, Denials, Questions, Answers, and the Common Ground

Abstract: In this talk, I examine some of the interconnections between norms governing assertion, denial, questions and answers, and the common ground of a discourse. When we pay attention to the structure of norms governing polar (yes/no) questions, we can clarify the distinction between strong and weak denials, together... -

Read More @ Consequently.org

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IFL2: Quotation conventions A small matter. But an intro logic book needs to have a policy on whether mentioned formulae get enclosed in quotation marks. IFL1 took a sternly conservative line on this, leading to somewhat unsightly rashes of quotation marks. I originally was going to carry this over to IFL2; but I have belatedly decided on a much more relaxed policy, which will be followed in future draft chapters (a policy more in keeping, indeed, with usual... Logic Matters -


The Limit of Responsibility: The Ethical Paradox of the Anthropocene by Agostino Cera In this post I will try to describe the ethical paradox emerging within the framework of the so-called Anthropocene: the ‘new aspirant ... Read more... Blog of the APA -


Assertions, Denials, Questions, Answers, and the Common Ground Abstract: In this talk, I examine some of the interconnections between norms governing assertion, denial, questions and answers, and the common ground of a discourse. When we pay attention to the structure of norms governing polar (yes/no) questions, we can clarify the distinction between strong and weak denials, together with the parallel distinction between strong and weak assertion, and the way that these speech acts interact with the common ground. With those connections established, I... Consequently.org -


Assertions, Denials, Questions, Answers, and the Common Ground Abstract: In this talk, I examine some of the interconnections between norms governing assertion, denial, questions and answers, and the common ground of a discourse. When we pay attention to the structure of norms governing polar (yes/no) questions, we can clarify the distinction between strong and weak denials, together with the parallel distinction between strong and weak assertion, and the way that these speech acts interact with the common ground. With those connections established, I... Consequently.org -


Assertions, Denials, Questions, Answers, and the Common Ground Abstract: In this talk, I examine some of the interconnections between norms governing assertion, denial, questions and answers, and the common ground of a discourse. When we pay attention to the structure of norms governing polar (yes/no) questions, we can clarify the distinction between strong and weak denials, together with the parallel distinction between strong and weak assertion, and the way that these speech acts interact with the common ground. With those connections established, I... Consequently.org -


14th Annual Mad Meta Program is Out! Linked here. Conference is September 13-15, 2019, in Madison. PEA Soup -


4. Common Knowledge and Experience in Social Space We act in an environment in which much is in public view, and you might very well think that perceptual facts that cannot be known in common cannot be known at all. For any account that aims to explain the public character of our perceptual surroundings the notion of common knowledge will be of crucial importance. I have been suggesting that the most basic perceptual common knowledge is of a spatial kind: in order to... Brains Blog -


Smith on Smith Here is the opening paragraph to Vernon’s Foreward to Propriety and Prosperity. I would urge anyone interested in situated cognition to read his superb Rationality in Economics: Constructivist and Ecological Forms, amazingly an unknown work within situated circles, proponent or critic. Also worth a read is Vernon’s memoir. This book is a welcome addition to the resurgent scholarly… Man Without Qualities -


Hypothesis: There Is Only One Graviton What do I know, I just read Nature Physics and quantum theory textbooks, but I so don't have a physics degree (unlike my grandfather).But here's an idea. And it does have the merit of extreme simplicity and not needing to invent shit we can't observe because they're too tiny or multidimensional.We can't find gravitons or make them work, not because of anything mysterious about dimensions, but because there's only one graviton. The singularity like "point"... Ecology Without Nature -


3. Demonstration and Communication “One cannot not communicate”: this slightly unsettling axiom of Watzlawick’s (1967) is necessarily true of creatures operating in social space. The social spatial framework is not simply given to but achieved by us through activities in which demonstrative gestures play a vital role. We point, nudge, and direct others’ gaze towards third objects in ways that do not always require the use of language: jointly attending to objects is something pre-verbal children and (on some views)... Brains Blog -


Causation in Science and the Methods of Scientific Discovery 2019.06.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rani Lill Anjum and Stephen Mumford, Causation in Science and the Methods of Scientific Discovery, Oxford University Press, 2018, 278pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198733669. Reviewed by Clark Glymour, Carnegie Mellon University In both the big and the small, science has changed in the last decades. We have huge sky surveys capable of following regions of stars over time. We can measure the joint time... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Jesse Norman on Weber’s ‘Politics as a Vocation’ In History Today. capitalismJesse Normanmax weberSociology Man Without Qualities -


Factor One, Familiarity and Frontal Cortex In this post, Phil Corlett, Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine, discusses some of the ideas in his paper ‘Factor one, familiarity and frontal cortex: a challenge to the two-factor theory of delusions’ recently published in the Journal of Cognitive Neuropsychiatry.Over recent years, Imperfect Cognitions has become the premier hub and outlet for work on the neurobiology and cognitive psychology of delusions. It has featured my work on aberrant prediction error and delusions in schizophrenia... Imperfect Cognitions -


Perception As Controlled Hallucination: Predictive Processing and the Nature of Conscious Experience A Conversation with Andy Clark (video, audio and transcript). AIAndy ClarkCognitive scienceConsciousness StudiesDaniel DennettExtended MindPerceptionphilosophical psychologypredictive processing Man Without Qualities -


Sensory Substitution and Augmentation 2019.06.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation, Oxford University Press, 2018, 306pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780197266441. Reviewed by Mirko Farina, King's College, London The term 'sensory substitution' refers to the use of a sensory modality to supply environmental information normally gathered by another sense (Auvray and Myin 2009; Auvray and Farina, 2017). Sensory substitution devices (SSDs) thus provide through one sensory modality (the substituting... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Realismo Especulativo This new Spanish collection contains essays by the original four Speculative Realists, plus Laruelle, Negarestani, Toscano. Details HERE. Object Oriented Philosophy -


Living in the Shared World Many thanks to John Schwenkler for giving me the opportunity to write about The Shared World (MIT Press 2019). A question that has long fascinated me is how perceivers and agents can be operating in an environment that is public or, as I also say, shared; a world in which perceptual facts can not only be known through perception but can also be known to be so knowable by others. The public character of the... Brains Blog -


Now Featured We are pleased to have Axel Seeman blogging this week on The Shared World: Perceptual Common Knowledge, Demonstrative Communication, and Social Space, recently published by The MIT Press. To view all his posts on a single page, please click here. Brains Blog -


Dan Weiskopf on MVPA for Decoding the Mind The Brains blog is excited about the next Neural Mechanisms webinar this Friday. It is free. You can find information about how and when to join the webinar below or at the Neural Mechanisms website—where you can also join their mailing list to be notified of their webinars, webconferences, and more! Data Mining the Brain to Decode the Mind Dan Weiskopf(Georgia State University) 14 June 2019 exceptionally at h 14-16 Greenwhich Mean Time(Convert to your... Brains Blog -


Winners of Sanders Prize in Metaethics Announced The Marc Sanders Foundation has named the authors of two papers the winners of its 2019 Metaethics Prize. The winners are: Daniel Wodak (currently at Virginia Tech, but soon to be at the University of Pennsylvania) and Luca Incurvati and Julian J. Schlöder (both at the University of Amsterdam). Daniel Wodak, Luca Incurvati, and Julian J. Schlöder Dr. Wodak won for his paper,”Approving on the Basis of Moral and Aesthetic Testimony.” Here’s the abstract: If a reliable testifier... Daily Nous -