Professional

The Creativity of Philosophy

“I think of philosophy as partly a creative process and discipline, and I think it would be a tremendous shame if we lost sight of that part of things.” ¶ That’s Michaela McSweeney, assistant professor of philosophy at Boston University, in an interview at the Blog of the American Philosophical Association. Interviewer Skye Cleary asked Professor McSweeney, “What topic do you think is under explored in philosophy?” Here is the full answer, from which the earlier quote was excerpted: ¶ Let me answer a different question, which is what I don’t want us to lose sight of while nobly pursuing underexplored areas of philosophy. I think that recent pushes towards public and social philosophy are so, so important: we really need to be engaging with the public, and we really need to be addressing the (incredibly depressing) social and political issues that we are faced with. ¶ At the same time, though, I think of philosophy as partly a creative process and discipline, and I think it would be a tremendous shame if we lost sight of that part of things. I love metaphysics in part because it is one of the parts of philosophy that allows for some of the most creativity; there are fewer rules (or at least, there should be fewer rules—turns out that sadly there are lots of rules for what kinds of things will get published), for the very same reason that many people think metaphysics is worthless: it’s unclear what “the data” are, or whether... -

Read More @ Daily Nous

AE against Conscription

“Conscription for Ireland – A warning to England” – a pamphlet reprint of a letter against conscription by AE (George Russell). Held in UCD Special Collections. ¶ On 18th April 1918 the bishops of Ireland resolved to support the anticonscription campaign in Ireland. This was a key event in the conscription crisis of 1918, paving the way for the Mansion House Conference, which included representatives of workers and trade unions, the Catholic Church, and political rivals Sinn Féin and the Irish Parliamentary Party. On 20th April 1918 this broad alliance confirmed its opposition to conscription. The crisis strengthened Sinn Féin and the Irish Volunteers, and weaked both the Irish Parliamentary Party and British governance in Ireland, paving the way for the dramatic switch from the... -

Read More @ Irish Philosophy
Best T-shirt ever

Just back from a very enjoyable visit to Southern Evangelical Seminary, where I gave a lecture last night on classical theism.  Many thanks to the very kind folks at SES for their hospitality.  And thanks also for what is probably the best T-shirt I’ve ever seen – SES’s Act and... -

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Mini-Heap

Here’s the latest Mini-Heap—a collection of 10 recent items from the Daily Nous Heap of Links, our regularly updated list of material from around the web that philosophers may want to check out. ¶ (The Heap of Links consists partly of suggestions from readers; if you find something online that you think... -

Read More @ Daily Nous

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Best T-shirt ever Just back from a very enjoyable visit to Southern Evangelical Seminary, where I gave a lecture last night on classical theism.  Many thanks to the very kind folks at SES for their hospitality.  And thanks also for what is probably the best T-shirt I’ve ever seen – SES’s Act and Potency T-shirt, emblazoned with an image of Aquinas together with the first of the Twenty-Four Thomistic Theses.  You can pick one up via the SES... Edward Feser -


The Creativity of Philosophy “I think of philosophy as partly a creative process and discipline, and I think it would be a tremendous shame if we lost sight of that part of things.” That’s Michaela McSweeney, assistant professor of philosophy at Boston University, in an interview at the Blog of the American Philosophical Association. Interviewer Skye Cleary asked Professor McSweeney, “What topic do you think is under explored in philosophy?” Here is the full answer, from which the earlier... Daily Nous -


Mini-Heap Here’s the latest Mini-Heap—a collection of 10 recent items from the Daily Nous Heap of Links, our regularly updated list of material from around the web that philosophers may want to check out. (The Heap of Links consists partly of suggestions from readers; if you find something online that you think would be of interest to the philosophical community, please send it in for consideration for the Heap.) “JJ Redick’s first slide posed the following to his teammates: ‘Are we... Daily Nous -


Williams on Plato: The Invention of Philosophy Excerpt from The Sense of the Past: Essays in the History of Philosophy (2007) Plato invented the subject of philosophy as we know it. He lived from 427 to 347 bc, and he is the first philosopher whose works have come down to us complete. He is also the first to have written on the full… Man Without Qualities -


Moving to Miami! I'm very happy to say that Helen & I will be joining the philosophy department at the University of Miami next year!We bid farewell to many fantastic colleagues, and will certainly miss daffodil season in York...... but are thrilled to be joining the outstanding philosophical community at UM! Philosophy, et cetera -


The Key to Everything Freeman Dyson in the New York Review of Books: Geoffrey West spent most of his life as a research scientist and administrator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, running programs concerned not with nuclear weapons but with peaceful physics. After retiring from Los Alamos, he became director of the nearby Santa Fe Institute, where he switched from physics to a broader interdisciplinary program known as complexity science. The Santa Fe Institute is leading the world... 3 Quarks Daily -


The More Gender Equality, the Fewer Women in STEM Olga Khazan in The Atlantic: Though their numbers are growing, only 27 percent of all students taking the AP Computer Science exam in the United States are female. The gender gap only grows worse from there: Just 18 percent of American computer-science college degrees go to women. This is in the United States, where many college men proudly describe themselves as “male feminists” and girls are taught they can be anything they want to be. Meanwhile, in Algeria, 41... 3 Quarks Daily -


Jordan Peele Uses Machine Learning Tools to Make a Fake Obama Warn Us About 'Fucked-Up Dystopia'   More here. 3 Quarks Daily -


AE against Conscription “Conscription for Ireland – A warning to England” – a pamphlet reprint of a letter against conscription by AE (George Russell). Held in UCD Special Collections. On 18th April 1918 the bishops of Ireland resolved to support the anticonscription campaign in Ireland. This was a key event in the conscription crisis of 1918, paving the way for the Mansion House Conference, which included representatives of workers and trade unions, the Catholic Church, and political rivals... Irish Philosophy -


BACK IN THE SADDLE AGAIN On Wednesday I met my OLLI [Osher Lifelong Learning Institute] class on Plato.  About fifteen old folks turned out, including enough retired physicians to staff a small hospital and an Anthropologist.  OLLI is a hoot.  Preparing for the class I re-read the Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito and will in due time re-read the Gorgias, the four Dialogues I am covering.  As I think I remarked here earlier, all of us “professional philosophers” [or Sophists, to... The Philosopher’s Stone -


The Pitfalls of Compassion It has been quite a long time since the last time I posted on A Philosopher’s Take. In that time, I have finished my PhD and my partner and I had our first child, Oliver. But I figure it is time I start getting back to it, and I guess there is no better place […] A Philosopher's Take -


Arrival, Interstellar, and the Transcendence of Temporality by Grant Maxwell   If you haven’t seen Arrival or Interstellar, I’d advise you to stop reading immediately and go watch them. What I’m about to say will ... Read more... Blog of the APA -


lick the crickets https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54dd0f40e4b084e8da72e7db/t/5ad76d7f0e2e72aa52f96f88/1524067774141/lickthecrickets_hob.mp3/original/lickthecrickets_hob.mp3 via http://homebrave.com Synthetic Zero -


APA Member Interview: Michaela McSweeney Michaela McSweeney is an assistant professor at Boston University. She works (mainly) on the metaphysics and epistemology of logic, but is also interested in all ... Read more... Blog of the APA -


Plato’s reading suggestions, episode 127 Here it is, our regular Friday diet of suggested readings for the weekend: The three things that justify a feeling of achievement. Is science hitting a wall? (part II here) Why Julian Baggini does not meditate. How to serve a... Read More › Footnotes to Plato -


Friday Poem Spring and AllBy the road to the contagious hospitalunder the surge of the bluemottled clouds driven from thenortheast—a cold wind. Beyond, thewaste of broad, muddy fieldsbrown with dried weeds, standing and fallenpatches of standing waterthe scattering of tall treesAll along the road the reddishpurplish, forked, upstanding, twiggystuff of bushes and small treeswith dead, brown leaves under themleafless vines—Lifeless in appearance, sluggishdazed spring approaches—They enter the new world naked,cold, uncertain of allsave that they enter. All... 3 Quarks Daily -


ON THE UNDERRATED POETRY OF RACHEL CARSON'S MASTERPIECE Rebecca Renner at Literary Hub: “There was once a town in the heart of America where all life seemed to live in harmony with its surroundings.” This is the surprising first sentence of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, the 1962 book that arguably sparked the modern environmental movement as we know it. Rachel Carson was a naturalist and science writer whose early work focused on oceanographic conservation. Her most famous book, however, details the harm wreaked on... 3 Quarks Daily -


Kant and the Question of Theology 2018.04.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Chris L. Firestone, Nathan A. Jacobs, and James H. Joiner (eds.), Kant and the Question of Theology, Cambridge University Press, 2017, pp.260, $99.99, ISBN 9781107116818. Reviewed by Stephen R. Palmquist, Hong Kong Baptist University/Sogang University This collection of twelve essays on various themes relating to Kant's theology and theory of religion is the latest contribution to a welcome trend in Kant-scholarship that has been... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Peirce's Speculative Grammar: Logic as Semiotics 2018.04.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Francesco Bellucci, Peirce's Speculative Grammar: Logic as Semiotics, Routledge, 2018, 388 pp., $150.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780415793506. Reviewed by Mats Bergman, University of Helsinki Francesco Bellucci offers an erudite exposition of the fundaments of Charles S. Peirce's philosophical theory of signs. His study is both highly ambitious and rigorously delimited, seeking to reconstruct the logical character and systematic development of Peirce's semiotic grammar by means of... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


La fin de l’hospitalité reviewed in Critical Inquiry Authored by Guillaume Le Blanc and Fabienne Brugère, La fin de l’hospitalité: Lampedusa, Lesbos, Calais . . . jusqu’où irons-nous? (Paris: Flammarion, 2017) and reviewed by Corina Stan. Here’s part of the take: La fin de l’hospitalité was a prompt response to the mismanagement of the refugee crisis in 2015–2016 in Europe: the surveillance of the Mediterranean, the reinforcement of frontiers, the building of walls, camps, and centers where refugees were categorized, their life projects changed, their immigration... Philosophy in a Time of Error -