Professional

How (not) to teach philosophy

I went into reading this blog post (by a non-philosopher) on how to teach Heidegger expecting the worst. I didn't find it, but I do think there are problems. The motivating question behind the post is how to apply lessons from The New Education to teaching a class on Heidegger (no more information provided on what from Heidegger is being taught, what the course is, etc.). Cathy Davidson, author of  the blog post and the book in question, champions:innovators [who] are breaking down barriers between ossified fields of study, presenting their students with multidisciplinary, real-world problems, and teaching them not just how to think, but how to learn.  So, how to apply this exciting, disruptive (yes I'm rolling my eyes) approach to philosophy? Davidson suggests the following:Identify twenty keywords in the essay by Heidegger that you are assigning for the class, giving one of these words to each of the forty students in the class. Their job is to write what they think the word means, and to bring this definition to class. They get credit for trying, regardless of whether they get it right, but not if they don't try. Each student reads their definition to the class, then they get together with the other student who had the same word, compare notes, and then jointly compose a definition they are both happy with. Then they read this to the whole class. You can then collect these written definitions and, if you want, give a lecture during the remaining time.Begin the class by... -

Read More @ Language Goes on Holiday

Practical and Impractical Advice for Philosophers Writing Fiction

Hugh D. Reynolds has written up a fun, vivid summary of my talk at Oxford Brookes last spring, on fiction writing for philosophers! ¶ ----------------------------------- ¶ Eric Schwitzgebel has a pleasingly liberal view of what constitutes philosophy. A philosopher is anyone wrestling with the “biggest picture framing issues” of... well, anything. ¶ In a keynote session at the Fiction Writing for Philosophers Workshop that was held at Oxford Brookes University in June 2017, Schwitzgebel, Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Riverside, shared his advice–which he stated would be both practical and impractical. ¶ Schwitzgebel tells us of a leading coiffeur who styles himself as a “Philosopher of Hair”. We laugh – but there’s something in this – the vagary, the contingency in favoured... -

Read More @ Splintered Mind
more on Roaming Millennial and the Lafayette debacle

The excerpts pretty much speak for themselves. While I do agree there was some pretty bad behavior on behalf of the students, some of Roaming's generalizations about the academy, on the other hand, aren't entirely accurate - at least as she presents many of those generalizations in her video where... -

Read More @ After Nature
Jane Goodall Is Not Here for Donald Trump

Julia Felsenthal in Vogue: When Dr. Jane Goodall poses for a photo, she counts down, “1, 2, 3, chimpanzee!” When she has a drink, it’s often scotch, which has the added benefit of soothing her sore throat. Goodall is hoarse because she’s been talking a lot—most recently about Jane, the new... -

Read More @ 3 Quarks Daily

Recent Sites about the Professional


All Posts in Professional

more on Roaming Millennial and the Lafayette debacle The excerpts pretty much speak for themselves. While I do agree there was some pretty bad behavior on behalf of the students, some of Roaming's generalizations about the academy, on the other hand, aren't entirely accurate - at least as she presents many of those generalizations in her video where intended as a critique of college, college students, or the academy at large.  It's one thing to After Nature -


Unequivocal Justice 2017.10.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christopher Freiman, Unequivocal Justice, Routledge, 2017, 157 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138628229. Reviewed by Andrew I. Cohen, Georgia State University John Rawls famously defends two principles of justice as those to which free and equal persons would agree. These principles apply to the basic structure of society. The basic structure includes the norms and institutions determining fundamental "rights, liberties, and opportunities" that any person... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Russian translation of Lovecraft book A deal has been signed for a Russian translation of Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy, to be published by my old friends at Hyle Press in Perm. Object Oriented Philosophy -


Practical and Impractical Advice for Philosophers Writing Fiction Hugh D. Reynolds has written up a fun, vivid summary of my talk at Oxford Brookes last spring, on fiction writing for philosophers! ----------------------------------- Eric Schwitzgebel has a pleasingly liberal view of what constitutes philosophy. A philosopher is anyone wrestling with the “biggest picture framing issues” of... well, anything. In a keynote session at the Fiction Writing for Philosophers Workshop that was held at Oxford Brookes University in June 2017, Schwitzgebel, Professor of Philosophy at... Splintered Mind -


Defence Mechanisms When conservatives hear the suggestion that they should do something good, they hear it as an accusation and a threat. Instinctively, they turn it around on the accuser, exhorting them sarcastically to do this supposedly good thing and predicting that disaster will fall on their heads as a result — and rightly so. When liberals hear the suggestion that the law should directly pursue just ends, they hear it as an accusation and a threat.... An und für sich -


Mini-Heap Once again, here’s the latest Mini-Heap: 10 recent items from the frequently updated Heap of Links, collected and numbered for your convenience. Feel free to discuss. The Heap of Links consists partly of suggestions from readers; if you find something online that you think would be of interest to the philosophical community, please send it in for consideration for the Heap. “The very numbness that can be so adaptive to survival, can also erect walls that stand in the... Daily Nous -


Jane Goodall Is Not Here for Donald Trump Julia Felsenthal in Vogue: When Dr. Jane Goodall poses for a photo, she counts down, “1, 2, 3, chimpanzee!” When she has a drink, it’s often scotch, which has the added benefit of soothing her sore throat. Goodall is hoarse because she’s been talking a lot—most recently about Jane, the new documentary by Brett Morgen (Cobain: Montage of Heck) that focuses on her early years observing chimpanzees in Tanzania’s Gombe National Park; and more generally, about wildlife... 3 Quarks Daily -


Opaque and sky high bills are breaking Americans — and our health care system: The problem is the prices Sarah Kliff in Vox: On September 28, 2016, a 3-year-old girl named Elodie Fowler slid into an MRI machine at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital in Palo Alto, California. Doctors wanted to better understand a rare genetic condition that was causing swelling along the right side of her body and problems processing regular food. The scan took about 30 minutes. The hospital’s doctors used the results to start Elodie on an experimental new drug regimen. Fowler’s... 3 Quarks Daily -


CFP: Duke Graduate Conference in Political Theory, 2017-2018 The Political Science department at Duke University will host its annual Graduate Conference in Political Theory on February 8-9, 2018. We will consider proposals from graduate students in any related discipline, and on any topic in the fields of political … Continue reading → Public Reason -


In-der-Blog-seinPhilosophy in a Time of Error podcasts Peter Gratton's lecture on Heidegger's lecture course Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics. The last part of the lecture course (GA 29/30), on the λόγος ἀποφαντικός, is an important step on the way to Heidegger's understanding of the ontological priority of being-as-truth in the 1930s. Enowning -


Digital Selves David Berry/ Legacy Russell/ Laurence Scott Listen to the podcast here or on YouTube Watch Legacy’s full presentation here How does our ubiquitous digital culture affect our sense of self? Is the self distorted, or do we now possess an invigorating digital selfdom? Should we revise our philosophical conceptions of the self in the light of social media? Our panel of writers, artists, and political theorists explore what happens to memory, emotion, and thought in... The Forum -


The Strangely Revealing Debate Over Viking Couture Sigal Samuel at The Atlantic: A researcher at a Swedish university says that Viking burial clothes bear the word “Allah”—and some people really want to believe her. Annika Larsson, a textile researcher at Uppsala University who was putting together an exhibit on Viking couture, decided to examine the contents of a Viking woman’s boat grave that had been excavated decades ago in Gamla Uppsala, Sweden. Inspecting the woman’s silk burial clothes, Larsson noticed small geometric... 3 Quarks Daily -


The Strangely Revealing Debate Over Viking Couture Sigal Samuel at The Atlantic: A researcher at a Swedish university says that Viking burial clothes bear the word “Allah”—and some people really want to believe her. Annika Larsson, a textile researcher at Uppsala University who was putting together an exhibit on Viking couture, decided to examine the contents of a Viking woman’s boat grave that had been excavated decades ago in Gamla Uppsala, Sweden. Inspecting the woman’s silk burial clothes, Larsson noticed small geometric... 3 Quarks Daily -


on 'Tell Them They’re Not Trees' Dorian Stuber at Open Letters Monthly:  “I was born in Romania, and I am Jewish. That makes me a Jew, and a Romanian.” This might seem a straightforward, even self-evident claim. But for Mihail Sebastian—whose brilliant novel For Two Thousand Years, first published in 1934, is now available in a sparkling translation by the Romanian-based Irish short story writer Philip Ó Ceallaigh—this assertion of identity names a problem rather than a tautology. To be a Jew... 3 Quarks Daily -


WHY DOES LITERATURE HAVE SO LITTLE TO SAY ABOUT ILLNESS? Meghan O'Rourke at Literary Hub: It’s true, as Daudet says, that words aren’t of “use” to the ill person: They can’t capture pain. But words help us in a subtler way—they save us from the isolation of illness and mortality. I don’t mean anything as reassuring as “they make us less alone” (they don’t, really). But they do give form to an experience that is otherwise shapeless, and in so doing they make us less estranged from... 3 Quarks Daily -


Black Issues in Philosophy – A New Series Presented by the American Philosophical Association Blog Here’s the announcement by the APA: ‘Dear Readers: We here introduce Black Issues in Philosophy: Blog of the APA Committee on the Status of Black Philosophers. The purpose of this series is to offer announcements, discussions, critical reviews, opinionated statements (op-eds), and philosophical suggestions, ideas, or explorations relevant to the status of philosophers of African descent and readers interested in such issues….’ You can read articles, find out how to contribute, and more at the... Ordinary Philosophy -


How (not) to teach philosophy I went into reading this blog post (by a non-philosopher) on how to teach Heidegger expecting the worst. I didn't find it, but I do think there are problems. The motivating question behind the post is how to apply lessons from The New Education to teaching a class on Heidegger (no more information provided on what from Heidegger is being taught, what the course is, etc.). Cathy Davidson, author of  the blog post and the book in question,... Language Goes on Holiday -


$2.6 Milllion Grant for “The Geography of Philosophy” Philosophers Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh) and Stephen Stich (Rutgers) and anthropologist H. Clark Barrett (UCLA) have been awarded a $2,569,563 grant from the John Templeton Foundation to fund their project, “The Geography of Philosophy: An Interdisciplinary Cross-Cultural Exploration of Universality and Diversity in Fundamental Philosophical Concepts.” Here’s a description of the project: Throughout the history of philosophy, many thinkers have urged that some fundamental philosophical concepts are universal–used by all rational people. Historians and anthropologists have often... Daily Nous -


Out now: The Philosophy of Social Evolution, by Jonathan Birch Dr Jonathan Birch’s new book, The Philosophy of Social Evolution, is out today. From mitochondria to meerkats, the natural world is full of spectacular examples of social behaviour. In the early 1960s W. D. Hamilton changed the way we think about how such behaviour evolves. He introduced three key innovations – now known as Hamilton’s rule, kin selection, and inclusive fitness – and his pioneering work kick-started a research programme now known as social evolution... LSE Philosophy -


The Age of Responsibility 2017.10.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Yascha Mounk, The Age of Responsibility, Harvard University Press, 2017, 280 pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674545465. Reviewed by Scott Anderson, University of British Columbia This is an impressive, frequently charming, and partly successful attempt to illuminate the way a distinctive understanding of “personal responsibility” — one which might be described as “responsibility as accountability” — has taken on an increasingly large and problematic role... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -