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Philosophy Talk at Marmara: Assoc. Prof. Yaylagül Ceran Karataş on “What Happened to Human Being: New Perspectives/Questions on Philosophical Anthropology” (07.06.2022) Via Zoom

Assoc. Prof. Yaylagül Ceran Karataş (Istanbul Medeniyet University) will give a talk at Marmara on Tuesday. All are welcome. ¶ Date: Tuesday June 7, 2022 ¶ Time: 18:00 – 20:00 (Istanbul Time) ¶ To attend the event please send an e-mail to marmara.phil.talks@gmail.com ¶ “What Happened to Human Being: New Perspectives/Questions on Philosophical Anthropology“ About The Speaker: Yaylagül Ceran Karataş graduated from Istanbul University, Department of Philosophy in 1999. She has two master degree. First one was at the Istanbul University, History of Philosophy in 2001, her thesis was about Critics of Modern Subject: Modernite versus Postmodernite. Second one was at the Boston University, Urban Affairs Program in 2010, her project was about Effects of Broadband – Smart Cities on Human Being. Her doctorate in 2010 at the Marmara University, Philosophy of Religion. Her thesis subject was Understanding of Human Being in Philosophy of Whitehead. She has been working Istanbul Medeniyet University, Department of Philosophy since 2014. She received title of associate professor in 2019. She is interested in philosophical anthropology, evil problems, city and philosophy, and gender issues. Her focus nowadays working, reading, and writing on posthumanism. She wrote articles about evil problem, contemporary feminist debates, posthumanism, city and philosophical anthropology. Her new book Posthuman is on the shelves next month. Abstract: I will mention contemporary two philosophical anthropology interpretations which are an intersection of critics of “human/man being”. The one is a linguistic perspective which changed and revised setting up the question of philosophical anthropology (Wittgenstein, Cassirer and... -

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NOT THINKING LIKE A LIBERAL

Several days ago, I received from Raymond Geuss a copy of his new book, Not Thinking like a Liberal, which has just been published by Harvard. It is an intense, complex, deeply interior account of his philosophical development first as a boy in a Catholic private school and then as an undergraduate and graduate student at Columbia University.  Geuss, as I am sure you all know, is a distinguished philosopher now retired from Cambridge University, the author of a number of books.   Geuss and I come from backgrounds so different from one another that it is hard to believe we could ever inhabit the same world and yet, for a span of time in the 1960s and a little bit beyond, our lives... -

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APA Member Interview: Philipa Friedman

Philipa (Pippa) Friedman (she/her) works in social and political philosophy, particularly political epistemology and democratic theory. She earned her PhD in December 2021 and is beginning a career in policy analysis with the federal government. What are you working on right now? This is a really hard question for me... -

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Results of the Recent APA Elections

Over the last few months, members of the APA elected new divisional officers, a new member-at-large of the APA board of officers, two new members of the Graduate Student Council (GSC), and also considered amendments to the association’s bylaws. We are pleased to announce the results of those votes. All... -

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Results of the Recent APA Elections Over the last few months, members of the APA elected new divisional officers, a new member-at-large of the APA board of officers, two new members of the Graduate Student Council (GSC), and also considered amendments to the association’s bylaws. We are pleased to announce the results of those votes. All newly elected members will begin […] Blog of the APA -


Beginning Category Theory: Chs 1 to 14 (etc.) Back from Cornwall, and I have now revised Chapters 1 to 14 of Beginning Category Theory. So here they are. As before, to keep things simple, there is one long PDF with both the reworked chapters and the remaining unrevised chapters from the 2015/2018 Gentle Intro. I have added a little to Ch. 2, and tidied up Ch. 12. But the main revision this time is a much improved version of Chapter 14 on equalizers... Logic Matters -


APA Member Interview: Philipa Friedman Philipa (Pippa) Friedman (she/her) works in social and political philosophy, particularly political epistemology and democratic theory. She earned her PhD in December 2021 and is beginning a career in policy analysis with the federal government. What are you working on right now? This is a really hard question for me in some ways, because I […] Blog of the APA -


Culture and Cognitive Science [New Entry by Daniel R. Kelly and Andreas De Block on June 2, 2022.] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by Daniel Kelly and Andreas De Block replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous author.] Human behavior and thought often exhibit a familiar pattern of within... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Theories of the Common Law of Torts [New Entry by Arthur Ripstein on June 2, 2022.] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by Arthur Ripstein replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous authors.] Tort is a branch of private law. It focuses on interpersonal... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Eugenics [Revised entry by Inmaculada de Melo-Martin and Sara Goering on June 2, 2022. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] "Eugenics" is a term loaded with historical significance and a strong negative valence. Its literal meaning - good birth - suggests a suitable goal for all prospective parents, yet its historical connotations tie it to appalling policies, including forced sterilizations, selective breeding programs in North America and Asia, and horrifying concentration camps and mass exterminations in Nazi... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


HAIL AND FAREWELL Eighteen years ago, in the early months of 2004, Susie and I paid off the mortgage on the house we had built for us when we married in 1987.  Feeling flush with cash, we made two big expenditures.  First, I bought for myself a brand-new flashy Toyota Camry with all the bells and whistles – power doors, power windows, power seats, and cruise control. Then Susie and I bought a tiny 330 square foot apartment... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Philosophy Talk at Marmara: Assoc. Prof. Yaylagül Ceran Karataş on “What Happened to Human Being: New Perspectives/Questions on Philosophical Anthropology” (07.06.2022) Via Zoom Assoc. Prof. Yaylagül Ceran Karataş (Istanbul Medeniyet University) will give a talk at Marmara on Tuesday. All are welcome. Date: Tuesday June 7, 2022 Time: 18:00 – 20:00 (Istanbul Time) To attend the event please send an e-mail to marmara.phil.talks@gmail.com “What Happened to Human Being: New Perspectives/Questions on Philosophical Anthropology“ About The Speaker: Yaylagül Ceran Karataş graduated from Istanbul University, Department of Philosophy in 1999. She has two master degree. First one was at the Istanbul... Hesperous is Bosperous -


Jack Chambers Evolves   As we know politicians don’t have beliefs they have positions which they sincerely held at the time.  When they change their position they express this move as going on a journey.   In 2018 Jack Chambers at the time of the referendum to change the constitution to allow abortion which was passed, he was pro-life.  Now he supports abortion in all cases up to 12 weeks.  That position may evolve too.  In any case he... Ombhurbhuva -


Roe, Abortion, and the Right to Ourselves When I joined a protest the day after the leak of Samuel Alito’s draft opinion overturning Roe, rage overwhelmed me. My rage was not for the end of Roe—which I’d known was coming—but, oddly, at the protest: the same people, the same signs, the same chants. As the mother of a friend, marching alongside us, […] Blog of the APA -


NOT THINKING LIKE A LIBERAL Several days ago, I received from Raymond Geuss a copy of his new book, Not Thinking like a Liberal, which has just been published by Harvard. It is an intense, complex, deeply interior account of his philosophical development first as a boy in a Catholic private school and then as an undergraduate and graduate student at Columbia University.  Geuss, as I am sure you all know, is a distinguished philosopher now retired from Cambridge University,... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Soviet atrocities in Ukraine, 1941 In light of the horrific information now available about atrocities committed in Ukraine by occupying Russian forces in towns such as Bucha -- rape, torture, summary execution, as well as mass deportations to "filtration camps" -- it is grimly important to recognize that there was a prior period of fantastic brutality and atrocity committed by Russians against Ukraine over eighty years ago. The NKVD -- the secret police of the Soviet Union and Stalin's reliable... Understanding Society -


Graduate Student Reflection Series: On Being A Luddite I was born into a world of burgeoning technology, but I don’t particularly enjoy using it. So when I began teaching, it felt natural to avoid technology use during class. I also asked that my students refrain from using their laptops or tablets during class, and provided a printed handout or diagram to accompany the […] Blog of the APA -


Philosophy News Share: June 2022 As mentioned in my Summer 2022 Plans, to help keep readers up to date with what’s happening in the philosophy world this summer, I’ll be be creating a space each month for individuals and institutions to share news. Here is the one for June 2022. If you have news of the sort that would typically appear on Daily Nous, please share it in the comments. (For examples of such news, see the list in the first... Daily Nous -


Conjuring History: A Master of Djinn by P. Djèlí Clark  Great stuff! Interesting, surprisingly deep, and above all: fun!This novel (Clark's first full novel) is set in the same universe as several short stories and at least one novella (The Haunting of Tram Car 015). In an alternate history of the early 20th century, djinn and other magical creatures have come into our world from elsewhere, centered on Cairo. We meet Fatma, an agent for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments, and Supernatural Entities. We also meet... Examined Worlds -


Essays in Ancient Epistemology 2022.05.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gail Fine, Essays in Ancient Epistemology, Oxford University Press, 2021, 417pp., $105.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198746768. Reviewed by Lloyd P. Gerson, University of Toronto The present volume collects 13 previously published papers in ancient epistemology, written over the last 20 years or so. Seven of the papers are on Plato’s dialogues, two are on Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics, and four are mainly on Sextus Empiricus and... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Wrongdoing and the Moral Emotions 2022.05.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Derk Pereboom, Wrongdoing and the Moral Emotions, Oxford University Press, 2021, 204pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780192846006. Reviewed by Pamela Hieronymi, University of California, Los Angeles In this book, Derk Pereboom provides further elaboration and defense of his long-standing vision of a world without retributivism. This volume builds on his earlier work, of which he provides useful summaries. The result is exactly what we have... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


To Be a Department of Philosophy (guest post) “There are many reasons to expand the story we tell about philosophy.  But a main reason is just that the best, most interesting, and even the correct answers to philosophical questions that interest us might be found anywhere.” The following is a guest post* by Alexander Guerrero, Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University. It is the second in a series of weekly guest posts by different authors at Daily Nous this summer. [Gaba Meschac –... Daily Nous -


hughmellor.com It is a delight to see that, with thanks to Tim Crane, there is now a new website in memory of Hugh Mellor, who died almost two years ago on June 21, 2020. The site collects Hugh’s philosophical work, downloadable papers, memoirs and obituaries (and some photos, including this one by Mrs Logic Matters). I do miss Hugh a good deal, so I’m much looking forward to looking round the site. I’ll let you know about... Logic Matters -


Scottish Philosophy in the 18th Century [Revised entry by Alexander Broadie and Craig Smith on May 31, 2022. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Philosophy was at the core of the eighteenth century movement known as the Scottish Enlightenment. The movement included major figures, such as Francis Hutcheson, David Hume, Adam Smith, Thomas Reid and Adam Ferguson, and also many others who produced notable works, such as Gershom Carmichael, Archibald Campbell, George Turnbull, George Campbell, James Beattie, Alexander Gerard, Henry Home (Lord... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -