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“The problem is not that humanities jobs are disappearing”

In an interview at Inside Higher Education, Jason Brennan (Georgetown) and Phillip Magness (American Institute for Economic Research), answer a question from interviewer Scott Jaschik about their view that universities are admitting too many PhD students. ¶ Brennan and Magness, co-authors of Cracks in the Ivory Tower: The Moral Mess of Higher Education, respond: ¶ Everyone likes to blame the poor state of the academic job market—especially in the humanities—on alleged cuts to faculty lines … The problem is not that humanities jobs are disappearing, but that many academic fields are graduating new Ph.D.s even faster than their full-time job market grows. paper sculpture by Kate Kato ¶ They cite data to support their answer: ¶ U.S. Department of Education data (see, e.g., IPEDS tables 315.20 and equivalent in earlier reports) show that the total number of tenure-track assistant professors in four-year colleges has grown steadily since 2002, and is keeping pace with student enrollment … Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that the total number of humanities professors (excluding part-timers) has not only increased by about 60,000 between 2000 and 2015, but that humanities professorship employment grew faster than any other field except all the health sciences. ¶ The annual Survey of Earned Doctorates shows a similar pattern. In 2015, the humanities reported 1,383 full-time hires among newly minted Ph.D.s. The social sciences showed 1,215 hires (excluding psychology, which is sometimes categorized as a preprofessional discipline); life and agricultural sciences posted 920; math and computer science posted 441; engineering posted 399; and physical... -

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SIMON CRITCHLEY

Interesting stuff, man! I’m having a son. Going to have to read some Levinas! Words of wisdom for people trying to break into the book publishing game? I have always had close working relationships with editors since I started and that continues on. I could name 5 to 7 people who have really fostered my work and to whom I owe a huge debt. In England, because it's smaller, it's easier to hang out with people in publishing. But I only work with people I really like, and everything I have written has been written for an editor who I know very well. That's my rule. I don't care about reputations, the importance of the press or any of that bullshit. Academics have a lot... -

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What’s Wrong With Listening to Michael Jackson?

¶ ¶ Blog post here. -

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Free Thinkers Lost in Vegas

So-called “reaction” videos are big on YouTube and I suspect these guys are the most popular: I can see why. They have a great disposition, a palpable love of music whatever the genre, they offer good insights and don’t take themselves too seriously — they, like me, look for the... -

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Free Thinkers Lost in Vegas So-called “reaction” videos are big on YouTube and I suspect these guys are the most popular: I can see why. They have a great disposition, a palpable love of music whatever the genre, they offer good insights and don’t take themselves too seriously — they, like me, look for the funk-groove in any genre. If academia… Man Without Qualities -


What’s Wrong With Listening to Michael Jackson? Blog post here. What's Wrong? -


Marcel Dubovec reads The Inner Structure of Heidegger’s Concept of Freedom. From the British Society for Phenomenology’s Annual Conference at the University of Kent, in Canterbury, UK during July, 2018. Enowning -


Postcard from Cornwall Evening sun at St Mawes in Cornwall, where we have been again for a while. So no logic matters for the last fortnight (the book has not been nagging away insistently enough to the break the spell). And we’ve been trying to ignore Brexit too (which all looks even madder than ever). So a lot of walking along coastal paths, visits to some great gardens, and more walking. Or just sitting in the apartment watching the... Logic Matters -


Episode 15 Sacred and Profane Love: Faustian Ambitions In episode 15 of Sacred and Profane Love, titled, “Faustian Ambitions,” I speak with my colleague and neighbor, Professor Anne Pollok, about Johann  Wolfgang von Goethe’s famous tragedy, Faust.  For the purposes of our conversation, we use the Norton Critical Edition, translated by Walter Arndt and edited by Cyrus Hamlin, which is available here.  Goethe’s drama deals with the infinite striving that lies at the heart of the human condition, and how our quest for the... Virtue Blog -


Hello Russia and South America! The Open Logic Project website was hosted on a University of Calgary server that blocked visitors from various geographical regions […] Open Logic -


Dietrich of Freiberg [Revised entry by Markus Führer on May 24, 2019. Changes to: Bibliography] The extraordinary long life and active teaching career of Albert the Great (c.1193 - 1280) produced many benefits for the inception of philosophy in medieval Germany. Besides the vast corpus of his writings that fostered a generation of Dominican scholars in the German-speaking province, Albert lived long enough to impart continuity to this generation, which included Ulrich of Strasburg (c.1225 - 1277), Dietrich... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


“The problem is not that humanities jobs are disappearing” In an interview at Inside Higher Education, Jason Brennan (Georgetown) and Phillip Magness (American Institute for Economic Research), answer a question from interviewer Scott Jaschik about their view that universities are admitting too many PhD students. Brennan and Magness, co-authors of Cracks in the Ivory Tower: The Moral Mess of Higher Education, respond: Everyone likes to blame the poor state of the academic job market—especially in the humanities—on alleged cuts to faculty lines … The problem is not that... Daily Nous -


APA Member Interview: Getty Lustila Getty Lustila is a PhD candidate (ABD) at Boston University; he works on the intersection of early modern philosophy and ethics, and has written articles ... Read more... Blog of the APA -


Philosophy Ripped From The Headlines!, Issue #18, 4 (May 2019): Why We Should Be Really Happy About Being Moist Robots With “Free Will.” Philosophy Ripped From The Headlines! is delivered online in (occasionally discontinuous) weekly installments, month by month. Its aim is to inspire critical, reflective, synoptic thinking and discussion about contemporary issues–in short, public philosophizing in the broadest possible, everyday sense. Every installment contains (1) excerpts from one or more articles, or one or more complete articles, … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


Hobbes's Kingdom of Light: A Study of the Foundations of Modern Political Philosophy 2019.05.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Devin Stauffer, Hobbes's Kingdom of Light: A Study of the Foundations of Modern Political Philosophy, University of Chicago Press, 2018, 295pp., $50.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226552903. Reviewed by Adrian Blau, King's College London Devin Stauffer offers a brilliant and controversial esoteric interpretation of Hobbes's attack on religion, and relates it to Hobbes's metaphysics, natural philosophy, and politics/ethics. Although Hobbes apparently tries to show that religion... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Mini-Heap Lots of interesting stuff this week, so here’s another Mini-Heap: “I reject the idea that philosophy is argument” — “Most real philosophy, as experienced by most people, takes the form of fiction” — Eric Schwitzgebel (UC Riverside) “Lately, I’ve been wondering whether it’s OK for me to be a philosophy professor.” — Robert Gressis (CSU Northridge) lays out the case against… himself A film about an “intense debate” between a longtime mayor in an existential crisis and... Daily Nous -


San Francisco State U. to Launch Grad Certificate in AI Ethics San Francisco State University has developed a graduate program in artificial intelligence (AI) ethics. According to an article at the Wall Street Journal (registration, but no subscription, required to view), the program is one of the first of its kind, and aims to educate graduate students and professionals about the social and ethical issues related to AI. Students entering the program must already have a bachelors degree, and upon completion, three semesters later, will receive a certificate... Daily Nous -


President of Ireland Speaks at Youth Philosophy Awards Ceremony “Too many policy lobbyists have, often unknowingly, unthinkingly perhaps, accepted a narrow and utilitarian view of… education—one that suggests we exist to be made useful—which leads to a great loss of the capacity to critically evaluate, question and challenge.” These are the words of Ireland’s president, Michael D. Higgins, speaking earlier this month at the second annual Irish Young Philosopher Awards ceremony (as he did last year). The Irish Times reports that President Higgins urged caution about... Daily Nous -


[Deadline extended] CFP: MANCEPT Workshops in Political Theory 2019, Panel on Immigration and Democracy Date: Monday, September 9th to Wednesday, September 11th 2019Location: University of Manchester Website: https://mancept.wordpress.com/immigration-and-democracy/ This panel aims to bring together theorists and philosophers working on immigration and democracy. In international politics, issues like the zero-tolerance policies at the border, family … Continue reading → Public Reason -


Winner of Applied Ethics April Prize I’m very pleased to announce that the winner of the $250 “Applied Ethics April” prize is Kian Mintz-Woo, for the post “How Would We Know if We Made a Climate Difference?” Congratulations, and thanks for the great post and discussion! PEA Soup -


PETER ADAMSON SUPPORT ON PATREON OR PAYPAL! What is it like to be a philosopher? -


PETER ADAMSON Interesting! Could you give an example? A good example from Neoplatonism would be their idea that one thing can have more or less being than another. For instance the soul is a real being, and the body is a real being, but the soul is more real than the body. We nowadays tend to assume without even thinking about it that being is all or nothing, rather than a matter of degree, or at least... What is it like to be a philosopher? -


PETER ADAMSON In this interview, Peter Adamson, Professor of Philosophy at Ludwig Maximilian University and host of the podcast History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps, discusses Dungeons and Dragons, Wizard of Oz, his twin brother, Williams College, getting hooked on Plato, studying Dante, developing an interest in medieval philosophy, and then Arabic philosophy and Neo-Platonism at Notre Dame, why history of philosophy matters, the cultural narrowness of philosophy, the idea of philosophical progress, the role of biography... What is it like to be a philosopher? -


SIMON CRITCHLEY SUPPORT ON PATREON OR PAYPAL! What is it like to be a philosopher? -