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Scientists Disagree About the Ethics and Governance of Human Germline Editing

Despite the appearance of agreement, scientists are not of the same mind about the ethics and governance of human germline editing. A careful review of public comments and published commentaries in top-tier science journals reveals marked differences in perspective. These divergences have significant implications for research practice and policy concerning heritable human genome editing. ¶ The current chapter in the debate about the societal and political implications of human germline editing took off nearly four years ago, in response to a laboratory experiment in which researchers in China used CRISPR technology on nonviable human embryos. In March 2015, an article titled “Don’t Edit the Human Germline,” coauthored by scientists and others working on somatic cell genome editing and associated with the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine, appeared in the “Comment” section of Nature. A week later, Science published a “Perspective” commentary coauthored by another group, most of them scientists convened by CRISPR codiscoverer Jennifer Doudna, under the title “A prudent path forward for genomic engineering and germline genetic modification.” ¶ The first article described the “tenuous” therapeutic benefit, and the likely serious risks (including risks to future generations), of germline editing. The authors concluded that this technology was “dangerous and ethically unacceptable,” in part because “permitting even unambiguously therapeutic interventions could start us down a path towards non-therapeutic genetic enhancement.” They further suggested that “a voluntary moratorium in the scientific community could be an effective way to discourage human germline modification.” ¶ In contrast, the second article stressed “the promise... -

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Swimming for Ireland and the U.S.A.

Liberal intelligentsia are like synchronised swim teams. No one wants to have his arse in the air while the others are going around in circles. Being on message, always on message is important if you want to remain on the team. Larry Donnelly writing in thejournal.ie swims on two national teams the Irish and the American: (Boston attorney lecturing in Galway Uni.)irish journal articleThroughout the piece Larry sprinkles signals to show that his heart is in the right place"These women and men deserve credit for being well ahead of those we elect – and of most pundits, this one included – in assessing where their fellow citizens were on the topic. “It struck me, however, that almost no dissenting voices were heard. Without re-litigating the... -

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Philosophy Ripped From The Headlines!, Issue #16, 3 (January 2019): Piracy and Truly Open Access.

Philosophy Ripped From The Headlines! is delivered online in (occasionally discontinuous) weekly installments, month by month. Its aim is to inspire critical, reflective, synoptic thinking and discussion about contemporary issues–in short, public philosophizing in the broadest possible, everyday sense. Every installment contains (1) excerpts from one or more articles, or... -

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Heidegger's Poietic Writings: From Contributions to Philosophy to The Event

2019.01.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews ¶ Daniela Vallega-Neu, Heidegger's Poietic Writings: From Contributions to Philosophy to The Event, Indiana University Press, 2018, 205pp., $39.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780253033888. ¶ Reviewed by Charles E. Scott, Penn State University, Vanderbilt University A new species of philosophers... -

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Philosophy Ripped From The Headlines!, Issue #16, 3 (January 2019): Piracy and Truly Open Access. Philosophy Ripped From The Headlines! is delivered online in (occasionally discontinuous) weekly installments, month by month. Its aim is to inspire critical, reflective, synoptic thinking and discussion about contemporary issues–in short, public philosophizing in the broadest possible, everyday sense. Every installment contains (1) excerpts from one or more articles, or one or more complete articles, … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


Swimming for Ireland and the U.S.A. Liberal intelligentsia are like synchronised swim teams. No one wants to have his arse in the air while the others are going around in circles. Being on message, always on message is important if you want to remain on the team. Larry Donnelly writing in thejournal.ie swims on two national teams the Irish and the American: (Boston attorney lecturing in Galway Uni.)irish journal articleThroughout the piece Larry sprinkles signals to show that his heart is... Ombhurbhuva -


Sellars and the History of Modern Philosophy 2019.01.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Luca Corti and Antonio M. Nunziante (eds.), Sellars and the History of Modern Philosophy, Routledge, 2018, 285pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138065680. Reviewed by Johannes Haag, Potsdam University The editors of this contribution to the recently pleasantly enlivened field of Sellars studies pursue a twofold goal. On the one hand, they aim at illustrating how Sellars in his stance towards the history of philosophy was... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Heidegger's Poietic Writings: From Contributions to Philosophy to The Event 2019.01.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Daniela Vallega-Neu, Heidegger's Poietic Writings: From Contributions to Philosophy to The Event, Indiana University Press, 2018, 205pp., $39.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780253033888. Reviewed by Charles E. Scott, Penn State University, Vanderbilt University A new species of philosophers is coming up: I venture to baptize them . . . attempters.   -- Nietzsche The irreducible plurality of forms of being.   -- Daniella Vallega-Neu Daniela Vallega-Neu engages five volumes... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Scientists Disagree About the Ethics and Governance of Human Germline Editing Despite the appearance of agreement, scientists are not of the same mind about the ethics and governance of human germline editing. A careful review of public comments and published commentaries in top-tier science journals reveals marked differences in perspective. These divergences have significant implications for research practice and policy concerning heritable human genome editing. The current chapter in the debate about the societal and political implications of human germline editing took off nearly four years... Hastings Bioethics -


Eliminating Footnotes Makes Philosophy More Accessible by Nick Bird It’s 2019. Computers can drive cars, operate stores, and outperform humans in sophisticated games. However, computers cannot correctly read a PDF with footnotes. ... Read more... Blog of the APA -


A to Z az the (Hungarian) beku frozen (Indonesian) culus heavy (Somali) daji blow (Chinese) eetali earthen (Samoan) fomelis small (Greek) gadak carcass (Gujarati) himlib he was (Uzbek) injuk Poughkeepsie (Sundanese) jazo penalty (Uzbek) kuza come (Xhosa) locho route (Gujarati) moshar mosquito (Bengali) noofa diesel (Swahili) oq what (Portugese) qoxa smell (Azerbaijani) radam landfill (Maltese) sujub goes smoothly (Estonian) teeke blanket (Frisian) upad decline (Slovenian) vlon seethe (Albanian) weshxo diagram (Zulu) xim color (Hmong) yashb live (Uzbek) zibimi... Eric Linus Kaplan -


Mini-Heap Here’s the latest Mini-Heap. “It remains to be seen how much of embodied-cognition theory will remain intact following the replication crisis” — at Quartz “There is very good reason to expect that she will produce sound and interesting work in philosophy” — a letter of recommendation for G.E.M. Anscombe, written by Wittgenstein “What are the cognitive processes that underlie successful social understanding and interaction—and what happens when we misunderstand others”? — Shannon Spaulding (Oklahoma State) is guest-blogging at... Daily Nous -


The Prescient Pessimism of Octavia Butler // republished from LOST FUTURES // In the 2020s and ‘30s, fire ravages California towns. Migrant caravans make their way on foot towards the closed border of Oregon. A new President promises to “make America great again” through authoritarianism and political violence. This is the future imagined by Octavia Butler in Paradise of the Sower (1993) and Parable of the Talents (2000) but it is also, of course, partly our present. While we have not completely hit the apocalyptic depths of... Synthetic Zero -


I Asked 400 Undergrads to Perform 90 Minutes of Kindness for No Reward. Here's What Happened Followers of this blog will recall my post from October 30, where I solicited ideas about a "Kindness Assignment" for my lower-division philosophy class "Evil". The assignment was to perform ninety minutes of kindness for one or more people, with no formal accountability or reward. I canceled one day of class to free up time for students to perform their act of kindness. I described the Kindness Assignment as "required", but I told them I... Splintered Mind -


Born in Exile by George Gissing (pub.1892) George Gissing’s rate of production worked against the development of a good style. He wrote eight hours a day producing a novel every year. When he showed a publisher two volumes of Demos that had as a theme contemporary worker agitation he was told that if he could produce a third volume they would publish it immediately. In those days novels came in 3 volumes. He set to and wrote it in two weeks. No,... Ombhurbhuva -


Did I Miss Anything? On Attendance “Did I miss anything?” It’s a common question from students. How do you answer it? You may try directing them to the following classic response from Tom Wayman (Calgary): How concerned with attendance should philosophy professors be? Philosophy centrally involves learning certain skills and developing certain attitudes. As with most skills, exercising them and witnessing others exercise them is crucial. Since the classroom is the primary arena for that, I think philosophy professors should think student... Daily Nous -


The Actual and the Rational: Hegel and Objective Spirit 2019.01.06 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jean-François Kervégan, The Actual and the Rational: Hegel and Objective Spirit, Daniela Ginsburg and Martin Shuster (trs.), University of Chicago Press, 2018, 384pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226023809. Reviewed by Frederick Neuhouser, Barnard College, Columbia University As its title implies, Jean-François Kervégan's book is a comprehensive and systematic reconstruction of Hegel's complex doctrine of objective spirit. It is comprehensive because it aims to explain the... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Family Portrait: Jazz Fest at 50 Just released. Scott Guion’s painting for Jazz Fest 50. jazz Festmusicnew orleansScott Guion Man Without Qualities -


Women in Philosophy: Why the Decolonial Imaginary Matters for Women in Philosophy by Emma Velez This essay reflects on my recent experience visiting two liberal arts universities in Texas with the goal of recruiting undergraduate students of ... Read more... Blog of the APA -


A Note on the Influence of Mach’s Psychology in the Sensory Order Giandomenica Becchio’s piece. carnapFriedrich HayekGiandomenica BecchioKantmachNeurathphilosophical psychologypositivism Man Without Qualities -


Music for preparing for classes next week Music for preparing for classes next week. I was lucky enough to discover Slowdive when I was just beginning my teenage years. Surprised they are still around today. Great live version of this song below. I'll also embed the full set (from KEXP). After Nature -


Infinity, Causation, and Paradox -- cheaper I notice that Amazon has two hardcover copies of the book for $25 shipped, which is about half of the regular price. Alexander Pruss -


Mindscape Podcast: Philosophy Outside Academia By Sean Carroll It took me a while to catch on, but I’ve become very excited about the prospects of podcasting as a medium of ... Read more... Blog of the APA -


CFP: Philosophy as a Way of Life The journal Metaphilosophy invites papers from scholars to produce a special issue of the journal on Philosophy as a Way of Life.  The special guest editors are James M. Ambury (jamesambury@kings.edu), Tushar Irani (tirani@wesleyan.edu), and Kathleen Wallace (kathleen.wallace@hofstra.edu). The notion of philosophy as a way of life has roots in antiquity in the work of thinkers from a wide variety of cultural and intellectual traditions. For these thinkers, the practice of philosophy was not confined... PEA Soup -