Professional

England’s Mental Health Experiment: It makes economic sense

Benedict Carey in The New York Times: England is in the midst of a unique national experiment, the world’s most ambitious effort to treat depression, anxiety and other common mental illnesses. The rapidly growing initiative, which has gotten little publicity outside the country, offers virtually open-ended talk therapy free of charge at clinics throughout the country: in remote farming villages, industrial suburbs, isolated immigrant communities and high-end enclaves. The goal is to eventually create a system of primary care for mental health not just for England but for all of Britain. At a time when many nations are debating large-scale reforms to mental health care, researchers and policy makers are looking hard at England’s experience, sizing up both its popularity and its limitations. Mental health care systems vary widely across the Western world, but none have gone nearly so far to provide open-ended access to talk therapies backed by hard evidence. Experts say the English program is the first broad real-world test of treatments that have been studied mostly in carefully controlled lab conditions. The demand in the first several years has been so strong it has strained the program’s resources. According to the latest figures, the program now screens nearly a million people a year, and the number of adults in England who have recently received some mental health treatment has jumped to one in three from one in four and is expected to continue to grow. Mental health professionals also say the program has gone a long way to shrink the stigma of psychotherapy... -

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10,000 Hours With Claude Shannon: How A Genius Thinks, Works, and Lives

Rob Goodman and Jimmy Soni in The Mission: For the last five years, we lived with one of the most brilliant people on the planet. Sort of. See, we just published the biography of Dr. Claude Shannon. He’s the most important genius you’ve never heard of, a man whose intellect was on par with Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton. We spent five years with him. It’s not an exaggeration to say that, during that period, we spent more time with the deceased Claude Shannon than we have with many of our living friends. He became something like the roommate in the spare bedroom of our minds, the guy who was always hanging around and occupying our head space. Yes, we were the ones telling his story, but in telling it,... -

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Proof Theory and Philosophy

This is my next book-length writing project. I am writing a book which aims to do these things: Be a useable textbook in philosophical logic, accessible to someone who’s done only an intro course in logic, covering at least some model theory and proof theory of propositional logic, and... -

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Episode #27 - Gilbert on the Ethics of Predictive Brain Implants

In this episode I am joined by Frédéric Gilbert. Frédéric is a philosopher and bioethicist who is affiliated with quite a number of universities and research institutes around the world. He is currently a Scientist Fellow at the University of Washington (UW), in Seattle, US but has a concomitant appointment with the Department... -

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Episode #27 - Gilbert on the Ethics of Predictive Brain Implants In this episode I am joined by Frédéric Gilbert. Frédéric is a philosopher and bioethicist who is affiliated with quite a number of universities and research institutes around the world. He is currently a Scientist Fellow at the University of Washington (UW), in Seattle, US but has a concomitant appointment with the Department of Medicine, at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. On top of that he is an ARC DECRA Research Fellow, at the University of Tasmania, Australia.... Philosophical Disquisitions -


Proof Theory and Philosophy This is my next book-length writing project. I am writing a book which aims to do these things: Be a useable textbook in philosophical logic, accessible to someone who’s done only an intro course in logic, covering at least some model theory and proof theory of propositional logic, and maybe predicate logic. Be a user-friendly, pedagogically useful and philosophically motivated presentation of cut-elimination, normalisation and conservative extension, both (a) why they’re important to meaning theory... Consequently.org -


In Philosophy Now Mahon O’Brien reviews the first Ponderings. Contrary to what some of Heidegger’s most fanatical supporters maintain, these notebooks are not rich philosophical repositories teeming with crucial insights that enhance our understanding of Heidegger’s published work. There are interesting passages here and there, not least his occasional references to Being and Time, which help to shed light on how he himself reflected on the successes and failures of his early work. Notwithstanding, it... Enowning -


10,000 Hours With Claude Shannon: How A Genius Thinks, Works, and Lives Rob Goodman and Jimmy Soni in The Mission: For the last five years, we lived with one of the most brilliant people on the planet. Sort of. See, we just published the biography of Dr. Claude Shannon. He’s the most important genius you’ve never heard of, a man whose intellect was on par with Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton. We spent five years with him. It’s not an exaggeration to say that, during that period, we spent... 3 Quarks Daily -


Sean Carroll: Extracting the Universe from the Wave Function Video length: 38:04 3 Quarks Daily -


Interview in The Revealer Patrick Blanchfield recently interviewed me for The Revealer, on topics related to The Prince of This World and my follow-up project. I am really happy with the way it turned out and grateful for the opportunity. Readers may be particularly interested in my self-exegesis of the final sentence of The Prince of This World. Filed under: The Prince of This World (book) An und für sich -


Spam, spam, spam, spam, … [Reposted/updated from thirty months ago.] There are only two options for any blog. Allow no comments at all; or have a spam-filter that filters what goes into the moderation queue. No way can you moderate by hand all the comments that arrive. For example, since I moved this blog to use WordPress — reports the plug-in at LogicMatters — there have been almost half a million(!) spam postings in the comments here filtered out by... Logic Matters -


videos of the June 2017 Leicester conference on Dante’s Broken Hammer Coincidentally, I’ve also just received THIS LINK to all the videos from the June 2017 University of Leicester conference on Dante’s Broken Hammer. Each of the three main parts of the book (ethics, aesthetics, metaphysics) was discussed in turn by Hugo Leitiche, Jean-Luc Moriceau, and Justine Grønbaek. Instead of giving a presentation of my own, I respond extensively at the end of each of the three talks. Object Oriented Philosophy -


video interview conducted in New Haven last October This was done in my hotel room at the very end of the architecture conference at Yale University. Nice editing job by the French filmmakers who did this (French subtitles are even included). HERE. Object Oriented Philosophy -


Political Discussion At the end of a long march they were talking about politics.  “We should go back to the time when everybody felt they were a big family and worked together” said Nimmi.  “That’s crazy” said Raoul.  “That led to incredible loss of life and wars.  We should go back to a time when people were united by a common belief about what Truly Matters.”  “That would mean going back to the bloodletting of the Inquisition.”... Eric Linus Kaplan -


Mind Chunks (Daily Nous Philosophy Comics) Mind Chunks by Pete Mandik Other Daily Nous Comics / More Info About DN Comics / Pete Mandik on Twitter   The post Mind Chunks (Daily Nous Philosophy Comics) appeared first on Daily Nous. Daily Nous -


Timothy Hall (1969-2017) Timothy Hall, associate professor of philosophy at Oberlin College, unexpectedly died this past Sunday at the age of 48. Professor Hall taught at Oberlin for 16 years, and wrote on topics in ethics and political philosophy. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and his PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Katherine Thomson-Jones, chair of the Department of Philosophy at Oberlin, writes: It is with great sadness that... Daily Nous -


Tirrell from U Mass Boston to Connecticut Lynne Tirrell, professor of philosophy at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, will become professor of philosophy at the University of Connecticut and have an affiliation with the university’s Human Rights Institute, effective this fall.  Professor Tirrell work is in the intersection of philosophy of language and social and political philosophy. She has written on metaphor, hate speech, racist discourse, apology, storytelling, pornography, and other issues. Much of her current work concerns the role of language in the... Daily Nous -


When Reason Goes On Holiday Neven Sesardic‘s recent book has really set tongues a wagging (to put it mildly), a book that is freely available here. Below one can Nevan hear talk on the topic. The discussion is all very disconcerting as Joseph Bottum points out in his review. History of PhilosophyJoseph BottumMartin HeideggerNeven SesardicPhilosophyPoliticsReasonregressive left Man Without Qualities -


TINA FERNANDES BOTTS SUPPORT WHAT'S IT LIKE? ON PATREON What is it like to be a philosopher? -


TINA FERNANDES BOTTS COMING SOON What is it like to be a philosopher? -


Interview with David McPherson, Summer Session Participant This post is part of a series of interviews with our incoming class for the “Virtue, Happiness, & Self-Transcendence” 2017 Summer Seminar. David McPherson is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Creighton University. Valerie Wallace is Associate Director, Communications, for Virtue, Happiness, & the Meaning of Life. Valerie Wallace: Where are you from? David McPherson: I am originally from Minneapolis, Minnesota, but my family and I now live in Omaha, Nebraska, where I teach at Creighton... Virtue Blog -


Philosophy Time with James Franco (guest post by Eliot Michaelson) The following is a guest post* by Eliot Michaelson, Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at King’s College London, about Philosophy Time, a series of philosophy videos he created with actor James Franco. The series comprises four short films in which Franco, Michaelson, and several other philosophers discuss questions regarding the nature of beauty, metaphor, imagination, and moral worth. The project is an attempt to make philosophy, which can sometimes be intimidating to newcomers, accessible. In a press release, Franco... Daily Nous -


What does Jane Austen mean to you? Geoff Dyer and many others at the TLS: We did Emma for A Level, so it was one of the first serious novels I ever read. In a sense, then, Jane Austen is literature to me. She was not just one of the first novelists I read but also the oldest, i.e. earliest. You can start further back, of course, but romping through Tom Jones feels like a bit of a waste of olde time in the way that Persuasion never... 3 Quarks Daily -


was Billy Budd black? Philip Hoare at The New Statesman: Was Billy Budd, the Handsome Sailor at the heart of the book, black? Scholars such as John Bryant believe that there is internal evidence in the manuscript of the book – found in a bread tin after Melville’s death in 1891 and not published until 1924 – that the author had played with the idea of making his hero a man of African heritage. Billy is loved by all... 3 Quarks Daily -