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Colleges & Covid: Time to Start Pool Testing

. ¶ I. “Colleges Face Rising Revolt by Professors,” proclaims an article in today’s New York Times, in relation to returning to in-person teaching: ¶ Thousands of instructors at American colleges and universities have told administrators in recent days that they are unwilling to resume in-person classes because of the pandemic. More than three-quarters of colleges and universities have decided students can return to campus this fall. But they face a growing faculty revolt. ¶ …This comes as major outbreaks have hit college towns this summer, spread by partying students and practicing athletes. ¶ In an indication of how fluid the situation is, the University of Southern California said late Wednesday that “an alarming spike in coronavirus cases” had prompted it to reverse an earlier decision to encourage attending classes in person. ¶ …. Faculty members at institutions including Penn State, the University of Illinois, Notre Dame and the State University of New York have signed petitions complaining that they are not being consulted and are being pushed back into classrooms too fast. ¶ … “I shudder at the prospect of teaching in a room filled with asymptomatic superspreaders,” wrote Paul M. Kellermann, 62, an English professor at Penn State, in an essay for Esquire magazine, proclaiming that “1,000 of my colleagues agree.” Those colleagues have demanded that the university give them a choice of doing their jobs online or in person. ¶ II. There is currently a circulating petition of Virginia faculty making similar requests, and if you’re a Virginia faculty member and wish to... -

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New links for people interested in philosophy… ¶ What is meat? — Andy Lamey (UCSD) takes up the question, and why it matters, in the NYT A podcast/discussion series on consciousness — “Consciousness Live!”, created by Richard Brown (CUNY/LaGuardia), currently has over 40 episodes featuring philosophers, scientists, artists, and others The neoliberal case for a universal basic income — from Matt Zwolinski (San Diego) Sometimes, irrational beliefs deliver “significant epistemic benefits that could not be easily attained otherwise” — Lisa Bortolotti (Birmingham) and other philosophers on “epistemic innocence” Decolonizing political theory — a reading list compiled by David Owen (Southampton) “I think of myself as a very passionate and committed naturalist.” Also, regarding consciousness, “it’s the only thing.” — an interview with Galen Strawson (Texas) “Extreme economic inequality, whether it... -

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Operation Thunderbolt: Flight 139 and the Raid on Entebbe

44 years ago. Cracking read. EntebbeIsraelOperation Thunderbolt -

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APA Member Interview: Kian Mintz-Woo

Kian Mintz-Woo is a moral philosopher; his work focuses on the applied ethics in climate change and health but also includes topics in metaethics and moral methodology. He is currently a lecturer at Princeton University and will join University College Cork in 2020. What are you working on right now? ... -

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Operation Thunderbolt: Flight 139 and the Raid on Entebbe 44 years ago. Cracking read. EntebbeIsraelOperation Thunderbolt Man Without Qualities -


Independence Day for Conflicted Americans Janelle Monáe and friends performing "Americans"Here's something I shared on social media: Spending part of July 3 bringing lunches to poor people in the projects and homeless people in tent cities in the wealthiest country on Earth in the middle of a grossly mismanaged response to a pandemic makes me really excited about Independence Day this year. (Just in case you missed it, yes, that is sarcasm.) Don’t get me wrong, I’m really, really glad to help,... Examined Worlds -


Colleges & Covid: Time to Start Pool Testing . I. “Colleges Face Rising Revolt by Professors,” proclaims an article in today’s New York Times, in relation to returning to in-person teaching: Thousands of instructors at American colleges and universities have told administrators in recent days that they are unwilling to resume in-person classes because of the pandemic. More than three-quarters of colleges and universities have decided students can return to campus this fall. But they face a growing faculty revolt. …This comes as major outbreaks... Error Statistics -


Metaphysics and Woo: An outsider’s perspective on academic philosophy’s social role As someone who has published a number of books on the nature of life and reality, I regularly receive emails from ordinary members of the reading public who want to share their own metaphysical theories with me. The vast majority aren’t educated in philosophy: some have little education at all, whereas others have doctorates and […] Blog of the APA -


Visualizing the Connections among Philosophical Topics Justin Reppert, a philosophy Ph.D. student at Fordham University, has created a fun tool that illustrates the connections between various philosophical topics, based on the “related links” sections of articles at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. “Philosophical Graphiti” charts the shortest paths of such links between two topics. Enter in two topics (as you begin to type suggestions to choose from show up in a window), and the result is a constellation of connections. For example,... Daily Nous -


Lakatos Award 2020: Nicholas Shea’s (Open Access) Representation In Cognitive Science We are pleased to share the news that friend of the Brains community, Nicholas Shea, has been awarded the 2020 Lakatos Award for their open access book Representation In Cognitive Science (Oxford University Press, 2018). You can download a free PDF copy of the book at http://bit.ly/RepnCognSci Shea will receive the Award and deliver their public prize lecture at the LSE in due course. In the meantime, find a blurb of Representation in Cognitive Science... Brains Blog -


Finding Philosophy Below is the audio recording of Gary Watson’s John Dewey Lecture, given at the 2017-2018 Pacific Division Meeting. In his talk, “Finding Philosophy,” Watson introduces the listener to how he found his way from adolescent searching to the excitement of academia, where he could then develop the path on which he became a penetrating philosophical thinker. […] Blog of the APA -


New Jobs, New Projects, Same Me I’m excited and lucky to share some updates: new jobs and new projects. I’ll explain below. New Jobs I spent the last year on various job markets. I submitted over 280 applications to academic jobs, public sector jobs, private sector jobs, and some non-government organizations. After lots of interviews and a few offers, I have … Continue reading New Jobs, New Projects, Same Me Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying... Nick Byrd -


APA Member Interview: Kian Mintz-Woo Kian Mintz-Woo is a moral philosopher; his work focuses on the applied ethics in climate change and health but also includes topics in metaethics and moral methodology. He is currently a lecturer at Princeton University and will join University College Cork in 2020. What are you working on right now?  Climate ethicists usually think of […] Blog of the APA -


The Anti-natalism Comparison: Contradiction, Equivocation, & Incommensurability Some philosophers argue that bringing a human into existence is always wrong because it’s better (for the non-existent) to not exist. Let's break down the most famous argument for that conclusion to find three reasons that it might not work. Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). Nick Byrd -


Unconscious Intentions Do Not Undermine Free Will Suppose neuroscientists could predict your intentional actions before you can. Would that mean that you lack free will? I used to think that it would. Now I'm not so sure. Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). Nick Byrd -


The Roles of Intuition & Reflection in Skill & Expertise Some people think that skill and expertise is unreflective and flow-like. Others disagree. They think that skillful and expert actions often accompany (or even require) reflection. In this post, I give you excerpts from well-known proponents of each view and try to clarify their disagreement.  Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). Nick Byrd -


5 Thoughts About “Liberal Hypocrites” Must liberals tolerate everything? Are they hypocrites if they don't? No. Of course not. In case that's not obvious, here are five things to think about.  Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). Nick Byrd -


3 Obstacles For Research About Cheating & Morality A recent study finds that "[traveling abroad] can lead to immoral behavior by increasing moral relativism". Sexy finding, but does it survive scrutiny? Find out in this short, 1000-word essay. Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). Nick Byrd -


Domain-familiarity & The Cognitive Reflection Test This week I'm commenting on Nicholas Shea and Frith “Dual-process theories and consciousness: the case for ‘Type Zero’ cognition" (2016) (open access) over at  the Brians blog. My abstract is in this post. Head over to Brains for the full comments and subsequent discussion.  Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). Nick Byrd -


Why Critical Reasoning Might Not Require Self-knowledge Tyler Burge famously argued that critical reasoning entails self-knowledge. Here I explain Burge's argument and my concerns about it. Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). Nick Byrd -


What Christopher Peacocke means by ‘Reflective Self-consciousness’ You have probably heard of self-consciousness. But have you heard of Christopher Peacocke's "reflective self-consciousness"? Allow me to introduce you. Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). Nick Byrd -


My Experience with Christian Apologetics I took a few courses in biblical studies and Christian apologetics as an undergraduate. The courses definitely influenced my thinking, but not in the way that I expected. They actually undermined my faith. They also introduced me to my current research. Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). Nick Byrd -


How To Create A Digital Library Want to have a digital library with you at all times? In this post, I lay out the 5 things you should think about while creating and curating your digital library. Via Nick Byrd - Fellow and Assistant Professor (to be) tudying cognitive science of philosophy (and philosophy of cognitive science). Nick Byrd -


Should We Continue to Honor Hume With Buildings and Statues? A campaign is underway to pressure the University of Edinburgh to rename Hume Tower. The building, named for philosopher David Hume, was built in the early 1960s. Hume was born in Edinburgh, studied at the university, and worked there as a librarian. [Hume Tower. Photograph by Simon Phipps.]The call to remove Hume’s name from the building is part of a broader movement to reconsider the various public honors bestowed on those with racist views. A petition to rename... Daily Nous -