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Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Here’s the weekly report of new entries in online philosophical resources and new reviews of philosophy books.  ¶ We check out and report on updates to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (IEP), 1000-Word Philosophy, Wireless Philosophy (Wi-Phi), and occasionally some other sites, as well as new book reviews at Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (NDPR) and in the popular press (if you notice any reviews of books by philosophers in non-academic venues, please let us know. Thanks! ¶ ¶ SEP ¶ New: Wesley Salmon, by Maria Carla Galavotti (Bologna). Artificial Intelligence, by Selmer Bringsjord (Rensselear) and Naveen Sundar Govindarajulu. The Ethics of Cultural Heritage, by Erich Hatala Matthes (Wellsley College). Epistemology in Latin America, by Diego Machuca (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Argentina). ¶ Revised: Free Logic, by John Nolt (Tennessee-Knoxville). Dante Alighieri, by Winthrop Wetherbee and Jason Aleksander. The Mathematics of Boolean Algebra, by J. Donald Monk (Colorado). Jacques Lacan, by Adrian Johnston (New Mexico). Plato’s Myths, by Catalin Partenie (SNSPA, Bucharest). ¶ IEP Mind and the Causal Exclusion Problem, by Dwayne Moore (Saskatchewan). ¶ NDPR Evan Tiffany (Simon Fraser University) reviews Me, You, Us: Essays (Oxford), by George Sher. María de Ponte (Seville) reviews Interpreting J.L. Austin: Critical Essays (Cambridge), by Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.). Adam Green (Azusa Pacific) reviews Renewing Philosophy of Religion: Exploratory Essays (Oxford), by Paul Draper and J. L. Schellenberg (eds.). Indrek Reiland (Barcelona) reviews Meanings and Other Things: Themes from the Work of Stephen Schiffer (Oxford), by Gary Ostertag (ed.). Bradford Cokelet (Kansas) reviews Inner Virtue (Oxford),... -

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Philosophy Books for Non-Philosophers: Your Recommendations

The father of a student who is about to embark on his PhD in philosophy needs some assistance. But he’s probably not the only one. ¶ The student describes the problem: “My loving father seems to have come to the realization that he’ll be stuck listening to me yammer on about philosophy for the long haul.” ¶ Rather than ask for earplugs, or for Advil, or for his son to reconsider, “today he asked me if I could recommend some introductory philosophy texts that would both give him the lay of the land and be enjoyable to read.” What a dad! ¶ Let’s help him out. Readers, what books about philosophy would you recommend to the smart, curious but uninitiated reader? ¶ In thinking about... -

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Now published: “Robustness Analysis as Explanatory Reasoning”

My article “Robustness Analysis as Explanatory Reasoning” is now out in the most recent issue of BJPS. Free access for a limited time via this link! I’m especially proud of this article! Here’s the abstract: When scientists seek further confirmation of their results, they often attempt to duplicate the results... -

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Biodeconstruction: Jacques Derrida and the Life Sciences

2018.07.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews ¶ Francesco Vitale, Biodeconstruction: Jacques Derrida and the Life Sciences, Mauro Senatore (tr.), SUNY Press, 2018, 256 pp., $90.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781438468853. ¶ Reviewed by Hans-Jörg Rheinberger, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science Francesco Vitale has... -

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Rob Haskell Today marks the death of my chum Rob Haskell. With hindsight, so much of what Rob told me in his last two years (in person and telephonically) reveals just how profoundly hurt he was: a hurt perpetrated not just by departmental bullies but also by a cowardly lack of gumption in coming to his defence… Man Without Qualities -


Biodeconstruction: Jacques Derrida and the Life Sciences 2018.07.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Francesco Vitale, Biodeconstruction: Jacques Derrida and the Life Sciences, Mauro Senatore (tr.), SUNY Press, 2018, 256 pp., $90.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781438468853. Reviewed by Hans-Jörg Rheinberger, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science Francesco Vitale has written a remarkable book. It rests on an extended analysis of the largely unpublished seminar La vie la mort that Jacques Derrida gave in the winter of 1975-76.... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Philosophy Books for Non-Philosophers: Your Recommendations The father of a student who is about to embark on his PhD in philosophy needs some assistance. But he’s probably not the only one. The student describes the problem: “My loving father seems to have come to the realization that he’ll be stuck listening to me yammer on about philosophy for the long haul.” Rather than ask for earplugs, or for Advil, or for his son to reconsider, “today he asked me if I... Daily Nous -


Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update Here’s the weekly report of new entries in online philosophical resources and new reviews of philosophy books.  We check out and report on updates to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (IEP), 1000-Word Philosophy, Wireless Philosophy (Wi-Phi), and occasionally some other sites, as well as new book reviews at Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (NDPR) and in the popular press (if you notice any reviews of books by philosophers in non-academic venues, please let us know. Thanks! SEP New: Wesley Salmon, by Maria... Daily Nous -


Now published: “Robustness Analysis as Explanatory Reasoning” My article “Robustness Analysis as Explanatory Reasoning” is now out in the most recent issue of BJPS. Free access for a limited time via this link! I’m especially proud of this article! Here’s the abstract: When scientists seek further confirmation of their results, they often attempt to duplicate the results using diverse means. To the […] Choice and Inference -


Formal Epistemology of Science in the most recent Phil Review For some top-notch formal epistemology of science, check out Conor Mayo-Wilson‘s “Epistemic Closure in Science”, featured in the newest Phil Review – hot off the presses. Choice and Inference -


The Reasoner 12(2) available Here. Includes an interview with formal epistemologist Julia Staffel! Choice and Inference -


Workshop on Mathematical Reasoning in Stanford February 9-10, 2018. Website here. Choice and Inference -


CfA: 2nd International Rationality Summer Institute CfA and website is up here for the 2nd International Rationality Summer Institute (IRSI2), to be held in Kloster Irsee, Germany, September 2-14, 2018. Choice and Inference -


GaLoP 2018, Thessaloniki, Greece 13th Workshop on Games for Logic and Programming Languages (GaLoP 2018), Thessaloniki, Greece, 14-15 April, 2018. GaLoP is an annual international workshop on game-semantic models for logics and programming languages and their applications. This is an informal workshop that welcomes work in progress, overviews of more extensive work, programmatic or position papers and tutorials. Areas of interest […] Choice and Inference -


Cfp: SEP 2018 Storrs The 46th annual meeting of the Society for Exact Philosophy will be will be hosted by the UConn Logic Group and held at the University of Connecticut (Storrs CT, USA), 18-20 May 2018. Conference website / cfp here. Choice and Inference -


Raising My Child in a Doomed World Some would say the mistake was having our daughter in the first place. The Stone -


WiNE Program Out The program for the 2019 Arizona Workshop in Normative Ethics (WiNE) is now available here. The post WiNE Program Out appeared first on PEA Soup. PEA Soup -


Happy Birthday, Ida B. Wells! In the course of my journey following the life of Frederick Douglass in 2016, I was so glad to have the opportunity to visit the place in New York City where he may have first met the great Ida B. Wells. It was late 1892, and this fiery young newspaperwoman had published her very controversial piece of investigative journalism in the New York Age on June 25, 1892. It was expanded and published as a pamphlet later that... Ordinary Philosophy -


Rebooting the Ethical Soldier In the coming age of high-tech warfare, the old rules of conflict will not apply. The Stone -


Mini-Heap Once again, here are 10 recent items from the Heap of Links, DN’s collection of materials from around the web that may be of interest to philosophers (and others interested in philosophy). (The Heap of Links consists partly of suggestions from readers; if you find something online that you think would be of interest to the philosophical community, please send it in for consideration for the Heap.) “Transwomen are to women as adoptive parents are to parents” — is this a... Daily Nous -


WHAT IS TRUTH?, ASKED PILATE The exchanges in the comments section triggered by Jerry Fresia’s comment and my response raise very interesting questions about what we know and how we know it.  To an extent that most of us do not often reflect upon, our knowledge of the world is socially grounded, not the product of individual observation or the formulation and confirmation and disconfirmation of hypotheses.  Let me offer, as a start, a few trivial examples and then a... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Finding Work That You Love Steve Jobs, in his 2005 commencement speech at Stanford, argued that we should do the work we love. Here is an excerpt of his main idea: You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work.... Reason and Meaning -


Latest Free Speech Controversy “Personally, I find the tiger’s views abhorrent,” read a New York Times op-ed column published just after the tiger got onto a school bus filled with third-graders. “But it’s far worse that left-wing groups are protesting by carrying fire and boarding up all their tiger-sized windows.” “Let’s not forget; there’s plenty of people who find Bernie Sanders’ views offensive, too. It goes both ways.” Here. Feminist Philosophers -


Raising a Child in a Doomed World Some would say our mistake was having our daughter in the first place. The Stone -