Professional

A Student’s Perspective: Universities Must Require Vaccination

As a college student who works as an EMT and was a contact tracer at the height of the pandemic, I believe universities must universally require Covid-19 vaccinations. When I worked as a contact tracer, I saw firsthand the ways in which colleges became hotspots for Covid outbreaks, due to poor university planning, a lack of testing resources, and congregate living situations. This personal experience is supported by New York Times data, which found that “Colleges and universities [were], as a category… hot spots for virus transmission.”  ¶ As of July 30, more than 600 colleges and universities require Covid vaccination, but 11 states (Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming) have none that do so. Obviously, appropriate exemptions and accommodations should exist for medical reasons, but without college mandates (and greater immunization rates in the larger population), the risk for variants to surge and undo the hard work and sacrifices of the past 18 months dramatically increases. ¶ In speaking with some college-aged friends, (who fall into the age bracket with the lowest vaccination rates in the country) I have heard their reasons for not getting vaccinated. It is not fear of the vaccines, but rather an idea of invincibility and the perceived hassle of getting vaccinated. Unfortunately, youth does not impart immunity from the catastrophic effects of Covid. I responded to an ambulance call from a 20-something student with Covid who was gasping for air. The prevalence of Covid infections and... -

Read More @ Hastings Bioethics

Speaking with the Living, Speaking with the Dead, and Maybe Not Caring Which Is Which

Since the pandemic began, I've been meeting people, apart from my family, mainly through Zoom. I see their faces on a screen. I hear their voices through headphones. This is what it has become to interact with someone. Maybe future generations will find this type of interaction ever more natural and satisfying. ¶ "Deepfake" technology is also improving. We can create Anthony Bourdain's voice and hear him read aloud words that he never actually read aloud. We can create video of Tom Cruise advocating exfoliating products after industrial cleanup. We can create video of Barack Obama uttering obscenities about Donald Trump: ¶ ¶ Predictive text technology is also improving. After training on huge databases of text, GPT-3 can write plausible fiction in the voice of... -

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UNWORTHY THOUGHTS

I have been appalled, angered, mystified, and frustrated by the belligerent refusal of so many Americans – even healthcare workers – to get vaccinated. Their behavior puts me in mind of the fire insurance marks or plaques that were posted on insured buildings in the 18th and 19thcenturies in... -

Read More @ The Philosopher’s Stone
Marisa Diaz-Waian: Philosophy, like Love, Is For Everyone

Marisa Diaz-Waian runs a community-based learning program in outdoor Montana. -

Read More @ Blog of the APA

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Marisa Diaz-Waian: Philosophy, like Love, Is For Everyone Marisa Diaz-Waian runs a community-based learning program in outdoor Montana. Blog of the APA -


Friendship [Revised entry by Bennett Helm on July 30, 2021. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Friendship, as understood here, is a distinctively personal relationship that is grounded in a concern on the part of each friend for the welfare of the other, for the other's sake, and that involves some degree of intimacy. As such, friendship is undoubtedly central to our lives, in part because the special concern we have for our friends must have a... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


François Laruelle’s A Biography of Ordinary Man Video Reading: Presentations This is the first of a new series of videos devoted to a reading of François Laruelle’s A BIOGRAPHY OF ORDINARY MAN. Agent Swarm -


A Student’s Perspective: Universities Must Require Vaccination As a college student who works as an EMT and was a contact tracer at the height of the pandemic, I believe universities must universally require Covid-19 vaccinations. When I worked as a contact tracer, I saw firsthand the ways in which colleges became hotspots for Covid outbreaks, due to poor university planning, a lack of testing resources, and congregate living situations. This personal experience is supported by New York Times data, which found that... Hastings Bioethics -


UNWORTHY THOUGHTS I have been appalled, angered, mystified, and frustrated by the belligerent refusal of so many Americans – even healthcare workers – to get vaccinated. Their behavior puts me in mind of the fire insurance marks or plaques that were posted on insured buildings in the 18th and 19thcenturies in England, America, and elsewhere. These plaques, which are now collector’s items, once played a very important role. Their function was to tell private fire companies which... The Philosopher’s Stone -


APA Member Interview: Thomas Colclough Thomas Colclough is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science at the University of California, Irvine. His research interests are generally focused on mathematical logic, the philosophy of set theory and the philosophy of mathematics in general. What are you working on right now?  Currently, I’m interested in exploring the extent to […] Blog of the APA -


Richard Double (1928-2021) Richard Double, emeritus professor and former chair of philosophy at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, has died. Professor Double was known for his work on free will. You can browse some of his writings here. His family provided an obituary from which the following is excerpted: Double was a tireless teacher and generalist who wrote provocatively across many areas of philosophy, specializing in ethics and free will. Double‘s work is cited in six sections of the Stanford... Daily Nous -


Why Relativism is the Worst Idea Ever The philosopher Allan Bloom once lamented: ‘There is one thing a professor can be absolutely certain of: almost every student entering the university believes, or says he believes, that truth is relative.’ Perhaps Bloom overstated his case, but as a university teacher myself, I think he’s onto something. Do people who proclaim that ‘truth is […] Blog of the APA -


Online talk about George Eliot and Spinoza (Agora Series) The School of Liberal Arts, University of Wollongong invites you attend the online Agora Speaker Series on Thursday 5 August, 3.30 to 5.00 PM AEST. Register here Dr Sophie Frazer (University of Wollongong) “Speaking brokenly”: Reading Romola with Spinoza  George Eliot’s historical romance Romola (1862-3) has long been considered a failure. An ambitious revivification of Renaissance Florence, with an exacting verisimilitude, Romola has often been judged a failure of style and story. In this paper, I argue that Romola is one of the... Feminist History of Philosophy -


Do We Still Need Physical Media? Image via Pixabay What follows is a guest post by Michael L. Moore. Despite growing up in the 1990s, my first introduction to physical media was through vinyl records. My parents had countless of them left over from their youth, and spinning The Jackson Five Christmas Album every holiday season was as much tradition as Santa Claus coming down the chimney. I didn’t quite understand how it all worked—how a 12” black disc with several... Aesthetics for Birds -


You’re Wearing That? From School Dress Codes to Rape Culture The email from my daughter’s elementary school principal arrived one spring afternoon.  It stated that effective immediately for all elementary school students (K-6th grade), halter tops and spaghetti straps were no longer allowed. Aside from the inconvenience–I had just purchased several sundresses, some with spaghetti straps, for my five-year-old daughter–I was surprised not only by […] Blog of the APA -


Speaking with the Living, Speaking with the Dead, and Maybe Not Caring Which Is Which Since the pandemic began, I've been meeting people, apart from my family, mainly through Zoom. I see their faces on a screen. I hear their voices through headphones. This is what it has become to interact with someone. Maybe future generations will find this type of interaction ever more natural and satisfying. "Deepfake" technology is also improving. We can create Anthony Bourdain's voice and hear him read aloud words that he never actually read aloud.... Splintered Mind -


GOOD NEWS Next spring semester, starting in early January, I will be teaching an advanced undergraduate course in the UNC philosophy department. The title of the course is “Advanced Political Philosophy” but apparently that is a placeholder into which I can put anything I choose. I have decided to teach a very traditional course with a twist.   The course will be divided into three roughly equal parts and the theme of the entire course will be... The Philosopher’s Stone -


“Settling” for a Romantic Partner A problem for many, especially the young, is that when they seek long-term partners they are moved by sexual passion and physical desire. They often fail to seek substantive people with whom they can experience a lasting, mature love based on compromise, tolerance, stability, and commitment. I realize this is trite advice, and I also acknowledge this thought didn’t occur to me when I was in my twenties. Still, it is surprising how many disregard this advice.... Reason and Meaning -


Bioethics Must Resist Attacks on Critical Race Theory There has been an onslaught of systematic attacks on the concept of critical race theory (CRT) in the United States, largely from the political right. It would be easy for bioethicists as individuals, and bioethics as a field, to ignore or dismiss this phenomenon—it is not in our wheelhouse, it is too politically charged, it is irrelevant to our work, it concerns K-12 schools rather than undergraduate and graduate education, it is not pertinent to... Hastings Bioethics -


Mini-Heap Philosophy-related links… “In Socrates’s late-night imagination, sex ought to benefit neither church nor common good but philosophy students” — Mary Townsend (St. John’s) on eugenics, Socrates, and the “rationalization of eros” Suppose there’s only a 1% chance that bugs are sentient — despite that small chance, we ought to support “a moral presumption against harming insects,” argue Jeff Sebo (NYU) & Jason Schukraft (Rethink Priorities) “All the liars are calling me one” — The Taylor Swift Paradox, as... Daily Nous -


Sliwa from Cambridge to Vienna Paulina Sliwa, currently senior lecturer in philosophy at the University of Cambridge, will be moving to the University of Vienna, where she will be professor of moral and political philosophy. Professor Sliwa works in ethics and moral epistemology, and has interests in epistemology more generally, moral psychology, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of physics. She is currently at work on a book, Telling Right from Wrong: Moral Testimony and Moral Knowledge. You can learn more... Daily Nous -


Still bad being a woman in philosophy What is it like to be a woman in philosophy? It means to be constantly underestimated and undervalued, and to only be seen as a sexual object by faculty members. This started as an undergraduate, when a faculty member decided that me being interested in his work was synonymous with me being interested in him sexually or romantically, and is ongoing every time people don’t take my viewpoint seriously because I am a woman. What’s... What Is It Like to be a Woman in Philosophy? -


A Sabbath Rest I am tired. I recognize that I’m privileged, that I don’t have kids, that we were able to keep our jobs, etc., etc. But I’m still tired. I lived through a pandemic, I lived through completely retooling my teaching for a format it was never meant to be in, and on top of that I bought a new apartment. Originally this summer, I was planning on starting a book project — a fun one, even... An und für sich -


Sounding the Alarm: 2021-2022 COVID Risks at Unprotected Colleges and Universities (guest post) Some faculty will be teaching this fall at schools in areas with low vaccination rates, whose administrators cannot or will not require vaccinations, mask-wearing, or social distancing. What, if anything, should faculty at such places, and possibly elsewhere, do? In this guest post*, Jeremy Fischer, associate professor of philosophy at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, asks these and related questions, hoping to generate suggestions and feedback from Daily Nous readers. Sounding the Alarm: 2021-2022 COVID... Daily Nous -