Professional

Videoconferencing for Climate Practice (guest Colin Marshall and Sinan Dogramaci)

The following is a guest post*  discussing the practice of making videoconferencing a regular component of academic conferences and the like, for the sake of the environment, by  Colin Marshall (UW Seattle) and Sinan Dogramaci (UT Austin). ¶ It follows up on Professor Marshall’s previous post, “Flying Less, Videoconferencing More“. Pete Mauney, time-lapse photograph of planes at night Videoconferencing for Climate Practice by Colin Marshall and Sinan Dogramaci ¶ Fellow colloquia/conference/workshop organizers: please join us in adopting the Videoconferencing for Climate Practice! The idea is simple. By using more videoconferencing, we can both reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and make the discipline more inclusive in a very cost-effective way. ¶ Colloquium and events organizers who adopt the Practice aim to ¶ Have a significant percentage (at least 15%) of talks and presentations be done remotely—in particular, through videoconferencing—instead of using air travel, and Find additional ways to improve the climate impacts of our professional activities, especially at the institutional level (universities, professional associations, and governments). These include aiming for higher percentages of remote and local talks, institutional support for buying carbon offsets, institutional divestment from problematic industries, and finding ways to directly influence local and national governments. A wide adoption of the Practice would have two effects: (1) reducing greenhouse gas emissions, thereby helping physical climate and (2) expanding the number of people who can participate in professional activities, improving social climate. ¶ A more detailed explanation and justification for the practice can be found here. There are a variety... -

Read More @ Daily Nous

Which Video Games for Which Philosophical Lessons?

It’s not unusual to solicit books, movies, and television shows that might be particularly useful for teaching about certain philosophical problems. What about video games? a scene from the virtual reality video game “Superhot” ¶ We had a post about this nearly five years ago, but it did not get much uptake. In the interim, the video gaming industry has continued to grow, and so has the share of the population playing these games. According to one recent report, 65% of American adults play videogames, and according to another, nearly 80% of all gamers are 18 years old or older, with half of that group being over 36 years old. ¶ Katia Samoilova, an assistant professor of philosophy at California State University, Chico, recently created... -

Read More @ Daily Nous
Recently Published Book Spotlight: The Idea of the World

This edition of the Recently Published Book Spotlight is on Bernardo Kastrup. He holds PhDs in both philosophy and computer engineering. He has authored many books and articles, both academic and popular, being a regular contributor to Scientific American. With his latest book, The Idea of the World, Bernardo has... -

Read More @ Blog of the APA
The Lesson History Teaches Is Tragic

The idea that we can avoid the mistakes of the past is misguided. -

Read More @ The Stone

Recent Sites about the Professional


All Posts in Professional

Which Video Games for Which Philosophical Lessons? It’s not unusual to solicit books, movies, and television shows that might be particularly useful for teaching about certain philosophical problems. What about video games? a scene from the virtual reality video game “Superhot” We had a post about this nearly five years ago, but it did not get much uptake. In the interim, the video gaming industry has continued to grow, and so has the share of the population playing these games. According to one... Daily Nous -


Pavel Haas Quartet play Janacek (video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtmX7-A9CUo The PHQ playing the second movement of Janacek’s second string quartet “Intimate Letters”, a couple days ago on Dutch television. The post Pavel Haas Quartet play Janacek (video) appeared first on Logic Matters. Logic Matters -


Recently Published Book Spotlight: The Idea of the World This edition of the Recently Published Book Spotlight is on Bernardo Kastrup. He holds PhDs in both philosophy and computer engineering. He has authored many books and articles, both academic and popular, being a regular contributor to Scientific American. With his latest book, The Idea of the World, Bernardo has been leading the renaissance of […] Blog of the APA -


The Lesson History Teaches Is Tragic The idea that we can avoid the mistakes of the past is misguided. The Stone -


Syllabus Showcase: Nick Byrd, Introduction to Philosophy Nick Byrd is a PhD candidate and Fellow at Florida State University working in the Social and Moral Reasoning Lab and in the Philosophy Department. Byrd researches reasoning, willpower, and wellbeing with both armchair and empirical methods. For more information, including preprints of Byrd’s latest papers, see byrdnick.com/cv. by Nick Byrd I am teaching at Florida State […] Blog of the APA -


John Dewey Research Center To Be Established In Shanghai East China Normal University in Shanghai will be the home of a new philosophy research center focused on John Dewey. Li Fushun and Chu Junhong, “阿尔山牧歌 镜心” According to Shine, since 2004, researchers at the university have been involved in a translating Dewey’s works into Chinese, producing 39 volumes so far. The new research center’s initial funding is coming from a 3 million yuan (approximately $422,000) donation from Hainan Enxiang Education Investment Company. 100 years ago,... Daily Nous -


Videoconferencing for Climate Practice (guest Colin Marshall and Sinan Dogramaci) The following is a guest post*  discussing the practice of making videoconferencing a regular component of academic conferences and the like, for the sake of the environment, by  Colin Marshall (UW Seattle) and Sinan Dogramaci (UT Austin). It follows up on Professor Marshall’s previous post, “Flying Less, Videoconferencing More“. Pete Mauney, time-lapse photograph of planes at night Videoconferencing for Climate Practice by Colin Marshall and Sinan Dogramaci Fellow colloquia/conference/workshop organizers: please join us in adopting the... Daily Nous -


The Lesson History Teaches Is Tragic The idea we can avoid the mistakes of the past is misguided. The Stone -


An aging philosopher returns to the essential question: ‘What is the point of it all?’ An aging philosopher returns to the essential question: ‘What is the point of it all?’ A reader sent me the following video. (Click on the link above.) It records the last reflections on life and death by the philosopher Herbert Fingarette (1921-2018) who had a long career at the University of California, Santa Barbara. As my reader put it: … there is an immediacy here that cuts to the bone. There is a difference between... Reason and Meaning -


Bernardo Kastrup Live! Join me for a discussion with Bernardo Kastrup, an independent philosopher who holds a Ph.D. in philosophy (ontology, philosophy of mind) and another Ph.D. in computer engineering (reconfigurable computing, artificial intelligence), as we discuss his argument against physicalism and his version of Objective Idealism. Bernardo’s websiteWindt & Metzinger paper on metacognition in dreaming video discussion Philosophy Sucks! -


Art and Objects arrives Just received my copy of the book this evening…   Object Oriented Philosophy -


Graeme Wood remembers Harold Bloom Some amusing anecdotes about the recently deceased Yale literary critic, HERE. Object Oriented Philosophy -


Architecture Exchange 3 The Architecture Exchange, founded by Joseph Bedford & Jessica Reynolds in 2013, is a series of events bringing philosophers and architects into conversation. I was the subject of the first event in London, which will appear in book form in February from Bloosmbury. Chantal Mouffe was the second subject (also in London, I believe). The third will be devoted to Jacques Rancière, and will be held November 16 at Cooper Union in New York, for... Object Oriented Philosophy -


To φ Or Not To φ To φ Or Not To φ by Tanya Kostochka Other Daily Nous Comics / More Info About DN Comics Tanya Kostochka on Twitter The post To φ Or Not To φ appeared first on Daily Nous. Daily Nous -


New Kickstarter Project: Vital: The Future of Healthcare ... here. Help fund science fictional speculation on health technology! If the project is funded, I will contribute a new story I am writing about the possible future of mood and attitude control in schoolchildren. Splintered Mind -


Supervision is a Major Barrier to Reentry I’m speaking today at the RAND Corporation on “Career Prospects for People with Criminal Records.” While I’m there, I’ll speak about our work at the Prisons and Justice Initiative (founded by Marc Howard) at Georgetown University, focusing on the education work: the Scholars Program, the Paralegal Program, and the Pivot Program. In addition to discussing our programs and bragging about our graduates, I plan to make two points: Reentry is a difficult process. The formula... Another Panacea -


Three Reasons Why We Should Not Request Letters of Recommendation for Job Applications by Helen De Cruz A standard element for a job application for a philosophy tenure-track position is three (or more) letters of recommendation, requested up front. Just glancing through this year’s PhilJobs, I see tenure-track positions that require “three recommendation letters,” “three letters of reference signed and dated within the last six months. At least […] Blog of the APA -


Mini-Heap The latest links from the Heap… “People who we thought had high self-control to achieve great life outcomes instead are really good at forming the right habits. They seem to understand the influence of situations and choose ones in which it’s easier to repeat desired actions.” — Wendy Wood (USC) on habits Why worry about AI? — Evan Selinger (RIT) surveys the array of reasons Attention may seem like the brain casting a “spotlight”, but it is... Daily Nous -


Lunar Leitmotifs: Red Moon by Kim Stanley Robinson Red Moon is definitely not destined to be among my favorite Kim Stanley Robinson novels.  It's nowhere near the Mars Trilogy, Aurora, or The Years of Rice and Salt (my personal favorites), nor is it quite as much fun as Galileo's Dream, as engaging as Shaman, or as wide-ranging as 2312.  In fact, Red Moon may be my least favorite of KSR's novels I've read.  But as I said in my review of New York... Examined Worlds -


Harold Bloom Harold Bloom: 1930-2019 “Harold Bloom.” Contemporary Authors, Gale, 2018. The Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University, Harold Bloom is perhaps the best-known literary critic in America today, as well as one of the most controversial. Describing the influence of the past upon poetry as a relationship of conflict, Bloom’s writings have consistently contradicted mainstream… Man Without Qualities -