Professional

The Battle for Philosophy in Serbian Schools (guest post)

Recently, the Serbian government eliminated philosophy from its required courses in high schools, replacing it with a set of electives (one of which is “logic and ethics”), and raising concerns not just about the education of students but also about those responsible for teaching the philosophy courses losing their jobs. ¶ In the following guest post, Ivan Vučković, who earned his degree in philosophy from the University of Niš, and who works as a philosophy teacher in a few secondary schools in Serbia, calls upon fellow philosophers and teachers in Serbia and around the world to fight for philosophy’s place in the education of today’s youth. [Lana Vasiljevic, “Silent Talk”] The Battle for Philosophy in Serbian Schools by Ivan Vučković ¶ In a few years, philosophy as a subject in high schools will no longer exist in Serbia. Since I teach this subject in several high schools, I will lose my job in ten years’ time. Unfortunately, however, not only myself, but also all of my colleagues from Serbia are in the same situation. ¶ Obviously, philosophy has begun to seriously bother someone. The question is who and why (especially now)? Why do we want to exclude the basis of all sciences from schools? Who are the “sages” that decided that such an “education reform” should be implemented? ¶ In addition to the problems concerning job positions, an even bigger and more salient problem is that future generations, if the situation remains unchanged, would be deprived of the option... -

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Princeton Soup!

For the past five years, the Prindle Institute for Ethics, out of Depauw University, has been a kind and generous host to the Soup. Andy Cullison, the director of the institute, reached out to us early on in his tenure to bring the Soup to Prindle, and we can’t thank him enough for that. But pandemics mess up everything, and one effect was that Prindle was no longer able to support the Soup. So today we are pleased to announce that Princeton University’s Center for Human Values has ridden to the rescue, and has taken the Soup on board its estimable servers, providing us with new technical support and a stable home base. Thanks to Michael Smith for facilitating the move, and to Andrew... -

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The Human Paradox

In this episode, Fiona Hughes and Adrian Moore discuss Alan Montefiore’s latest book, Philosophy and the Human Paradox -

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Episode 33: Dante’s Purgatorio

2021 marks the 700th anniversary of Dante Alighieri’s death in Ravenna. This is the second of three episodes exploring Dante’s The Divine Comedy, with Professor Matthew Rothaus Moser (Theology, Honors College, Azusa Pacific University). In this episode, we discuss Dante’s vision of Purgatory, a place where sin is healed and... -

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The Human Paradox In this episode, Fiona Hughes and Adrian Moore discuss Alan Montefiore’s latest book, Philosophy and the Human Paradox The Forum -


John Rawls [Revised entry by Leif Wenar on April 12, 2021. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] John Rawls (b. 1921, d. 2002) was an American political philosopher in the liberal tradition. His theory of justice as fairness describes a society of free citizens holding equal basic rights and cooperating within an egalitarian economic system. His theory of political liberalism explores the legitimate use of political power in a democracy, and envisions how civic unity might endure despite... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Valuing and the World As a latecomer to philosophy (I waited until retirement, after 30 odd years of working, before re-engaging actively with philosophy, both contemporary and historical) I have had to play catch-up. It meant reading a lot of stuff I'd missed after graduating college (and moving out into the world), and learning (and re-learning) things I had otherwise forgotten -- or missed entirely. It meant wrestling with philosophers at a depth I hadn't engaged in for decades... Serious Philosophy -


Immigration, Samaritan Duties, and Future Generations One reason that immigrants relocate to new countries is because they want their children, grandchildren, and so on, to lead better lives than they would otherwise. This somewhat banal observation offers what I think is a compelling justification for relatively well-off nations to admit migrants from relatively worse-off nations. This justification starts by appealing to […] The post Immigration, Samaritan Duties, and Future Generations first appeared on Blog of the APA. Blog of the APA -


Episode 33: Dante’s Purgatorio 2021 marks the 700th anniversary of Dante Alighieri’s death in Ravenna. This is the second of three episodes exploring Dante’s The Divine Comedy, with Professor Matthew Rothaus Moser (Theology, Honors College, Azusa Pacific University). In this episode, we discuss Dante’s vision of Purgatory, a place where sin is healed and the soul purified, so that a person can become truly free to enjoy the good. I hope you enjoy our conversation. Matthew Rothaus Moser joined the Honors... Virtue Blog -


A Confederacy of Dunces: extracts (49) “Goofin off? Shit. Goofin off ain cleanin up this mother-fuckin cathouse. They somebody in here sweepin and moppin up all the shit your po, stupor customer drippin on the flo. I feel sorry for them po peoples comin in here thinkin they gonna have theirself some fun, probly gettin knockout drop in they drink, catchin… Man Without Qualities -


The Battle for Philosophy in Serbian Schools (guest post) Recently, the Serbian government eliminated philosophy from its required courses in high schools, replacing it with a set of electives (one of which is “logic and ethics”), and raising concerns not just about the education of students but also about those responsible for teaching the philosophy courses losing their jobs. In the following guest post, Ivan Vučković, who earned his degree in philosophy from the University of Niš, and who works as a philosophy teacher... Daily Nous -


Intellectual conflicts of interest: Reviewers . Where do journal editors look to find someone to referee your manuscript (in the typical “double blind” review system in academic journals)? One obvious place to look is the reference list in your paper. After all, if you’ve cited them, they must know about the topic of your paper, putting them in a good position to write a useful review. The problem is that if your paper is on a topic of ardent disagreement,... Error Statistics -


Being and Reason: An Essay on Spinoza's Metaphysics 2021.04.01 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Martin Lin, Being and Reason: An Essay on Spinoza's Metaphysics, Oxford University Press, 2019, 200pp., $64.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198834151. Reviewed by Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Johns Hopkins University "To try to find out the reason for everything is very dangerous and leads to nothing but disappointment and dissatisfaction." With this zesty Queen Victoria quote Martin Lin opens the final chapter of his new book on... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE Before I continue  mydiscussion of the thought of Karl Marx, let me offer a little expression of praise for the online version of the New York Times crossword puzzle. For about 13 months now I have been doing the puzzle online rather than on paper, as had been my custom for 20 years or more. The great virtue of doing the puzzle online is that the app keeps track of how you do day by... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Tell us a Story! What Kind of Story? Ambrose wasn’t sure if he liked telling stories to the kids because he would get TOO into them, and if the stories were supposed to be scary HE would get scared and if they were supposed to be sad HE would get sad. And he wasn’t even sure if the kids liked the stories. And the parents — from what he had been told they DEFINITELY did not like the stories. They didn’t think he... Eric Linus Kaplan -


Mentees Interviewing Mentors: Rosati and Darwall As a present to our readers, and as an enticement to check out the new PEA Soup Princeton site, we present to you this lovely interview in our ongoing series “Mentees Interviewing Mentors.” Connie Rosati, co-editor-in-chief of Ethics and professor at UT Austin, interviews her mentor from the Michigan days, Stephen Darwall (now at Yale, of course). Among the topics discussed: the themes of Steve’s work, his approach to mentoring grad students, how the discipline... PEA Soup -


Burke Shelly Happy birthday to Burke: Now yer squawkin’: The story of Burke Shelley and Budgie bassbudgieBurke Shelleyheavy metalwales Man Without Qualities -


Princeton Soup! For the past five years, the Prindle Institute for Ethics, out of Depauw University, has been a kind and generous host to the Soup. Andy Cullison, the director of the institute, reached out to us early on in his tenure to bring the Soup to Prindle, and we can’t thank him enough for that. But pandemics mess up everything, and one effect was that Prindle was no longer able to support the Soup. So today... PEA Soup -


Think for yourself, Forget your Self: Ancient Buddhist advice for modern uncertainties (Video of a talk on April 8, 2021) I gave a talk (on Zoom) on April 8, 2021 as part of a Living Philosophically series for my academic department at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Check out the video below, which includes the discussion after the talk as well. More information, including the abstract for the talk, can be found after that.Living PhilosophicallyWe welcome you to two events for Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Humanities-Liberal Arts alumni, students, and friends this semester. Each event... Examined Worlds -


Hadrian the Seventh: extracts (16) baron corvoCatholicismFrederick Rolfehadrian the seventh Man Without Qualities -


A DAY OFF I took a day off from the extended comments I have been making about Marx because this morning I appeared as a guest in a freshman writing course at Cornell University where the students just got finished reading my little book In Defense of Anarchism.  It was a lovely experience and seeing them all on my computer on gallery view cheered me up no end. I have spent the last two weeks binge watching the... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Recently Published Book: Banshee and the Sperm Whale Jake Camp is a writer and community college philosophy professor who lives in Colorado with his sons.  He talked with Heidi Schmidt about his new work of fiction that highlights philosophy, life, and big questions of living. This is a work of fiction, but it deals with some central philosophical ideas. How did you set […] The post Recently Published Book: Banshee and the Sperm Whale first appeared on Blog of the APA. Blog of the APA -


WHO-China Report on Covid: Important Step Forward, More to Be Done The World Health Organization recently released a long-anticipated report on SARS-CoV-2 origins, based on 28 days of field research and site visits in China conducted jointly by 17 international and WHO experts and 17 Chinese counterparts. The report assessed possible pathways for the transmission of the coronavirus to humans and concluded that introduction through “an intermediate host” animal was likely to very likely, while a “laboratory incident”—the coronavirus escaping from a laboratory–was the least possible... Hastings Bioethics -


Leo Strauss [Revised entry by Leora Batnitzky on April 9, 2021. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Leo Strauss was a twentieth-century German Jewish emigre to the United States whose intellectual corpus spans ancient, medieval and modern political philosophy and includes, among others, studies of Plato, Maimonides, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Spinoza, and Nietzsche. Strauss wrote mainly as a historian of philosophy and most of his writings take the form of commentaries on important thinkers and their writings. Yet as... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -