Professional

Remote-Working Positions in Academic Philosophy

How will remote working in academia spread beyond the pandemic circumstances that familiarized so many of us with it? ¶ Here’s one indication: the season’s first and so far only (to my knowledge) ad for a research position in philosophy that tells applicants: “remote-work flexibility is a possibility.” The position is a postdoctoral fellowship “at” Emory University: ¶ ¶ You can view the full ad at PhilJobs. If you know of other jobs in academic philosophy offering similar options, please let us know about them. ¶ I asked Christa Acampora, the philosopher at Emory serving as the principal investigator on the project on which the postdoc would be working, about the decision to include a remote work option for the position. She said: The pandemic has shown that we can have deep engagement with colleagues through remote means. Of course, the basic tools were already available earlier, but the broader campus readiness and wider array services were lacking. It is now possible to have more and more connections with others on campus without actually having to be on campus. I think we’re already seeing fundamental changes in the workforce, with new ways to participate and new expectations among employees. Faculty life—our research time and how we organize our teaching and learning with students—is also changing. Ultimately, I think this will bring new opportunities all around. I wanted to be able to attract the philosopher who is right for the project, regardless of where she, he, or they might be. What matters is that... -

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Mental Health & Disability Network for Philosophy Grad Students

A pair of graduate students have created a network for graduate students in philosophy coping with mental and other health challenges, hosted primarily on Discord. [Sara Hagale, “Walkerings” (detail)]Parker Rose (UCLA) and Alexandra Gustafson (Toronto) aim for the network’s Discord server to be “a safe space to discuss experiences, share resources, and offer support to one another.” They write: We’re writing on behalf of the Mental Health & Disability Network, a new student-led initiative for philosophy graduate students, with an invitation for the students in your department! What is the Mental Health & Disability Network? It’s a multi-university network devoted to bringing together philosophy graduate students who are dealing with significant mental and other health challenges. Hosted primarily over Discord, the Mental Health & Disability... -

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Ethical Dilemmas in the Pharmacy (Teaching on TikTok)

This video is of an ethical dilemma posed by a Pharmacy student and illustrates the conflicts between respecting autonomy (by keeping medical information confidential) and nonmaleficence (protecting a friend). This is a story told to the professor by a student in a Pharmacy Ethics class he taught at the University... -

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MILLS CONTINUES TO DELIGHT

I continue to find every page of Charles Mills's book brilliant. By the way, S. Wallerstein is quite wrong about the book. Mills says relatively little about America in it – his focus is mostly on European thought. It is a great sadness to me that I am unable... -

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MILLS CONTINUES TO DELIGHT I continue to find every page of Charles Mills's book brilliant. By the way, S. Wallerstein is quite wrong about the book. Mills says relatively little about America in it – his focus is mostly on European thought. It is a great sadness to me that I am unable to tell Charles how much I am enjoying re-reading his book and how important I believe it is.  Students who stay with me through this course... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Ethical Dilemmas in the Pharmacy (Teaching on TikTok) This video is of an ethical dilemma posed by a Pharmacy student and illustrates the conflicts between respecting autonomy (by keeping medical information confidential) and nonmaleficence (protecting a friend). This is a story told to the professor by a student in a Pharmacy Ethics class he taught at the University of Mississippi. The student worked […] Blog of the APA -


Remote-Working Positions in Academic Philosophy How will remote working in academia spread beyond the pandemic circumstances that familiarized so many of us with it? Here’s one indication: the season’s first and so far only (to my knowledge) ad for a research position in philosophy that tells applicants: “remote-work flexibility is a possibility.” The position is a postdoctoral fellowship “at” Emory University: You can view the full ad at PhilJobs. If you know of other jobs in academic philosophy offering similar... Daily Nous -


THINGS TO COME I have now reread about 1/3 of The Racial Contract by Charles Mills, the last major work to be assigned in my course next semester, and my long standing impression is confirmed that it is the most important work of political theory to appear in English in more than a century – and yes that includes A Theory of Justice and even (hem, hem) my own In Defense of Anarchism. It is an extraordinary book... The Philosopher’s Stone -


What’s Wrong with Rights? Adam Etinson, Yoriko Otomo, and Lyndsey Stonebridge discuss the advantages and limitations of the human rights model The Forum -


Mental Health & Disability Network for Philosophy Grad Students A pair of graduate students have created a network for graduate students in philosophy coping with mental and other health challenges, hosted primarily on Discord. [Sara Hagale, “Walkerings” (detail)]Parker Rose (UCLA) and Alexandra Gustafson (Toronto) aim for the network’s Discord server to be “a safe space to discuss experiences, share resources, and offer support to one another.” They write: We’re writing on behalf of the Mental Health & Disability Network, a new student-led initiative for... Daily Nous -


New Article: James McCune Smith and Glasgow: A Scholar’s Transatlantic Journey, 1821-1837 Illustration of James McCune Smith from “Builders of History and Civilization: Pfeiffer Presents Dr. James McCune Smith, Physician and Scholar, 1813-1864.” Detroit Tribune, 9 March 1940. Dear friends of Ordinary Philosophy: My scribbling away continues! I’ve just written an article for the University of Glasgow’s Beniba Centre for Slavery Studies. It discusses James McCune Smith’s early years as a scholar and his years at the University of Glasgow, where he earned his bachelor’s, master’s, and... Ordinary Philosophy -


The Question That Quine Refused To Answer. You can download and read or share a .pdf of the complete text of this essay HERE. The Question That Quine Refused To Answer In 1998, at The World Philosophy Congress in Boston, W.V.O. Quine, the leading  Analytic philosopher of the seciond half of the 20th century, was asked by a New York Times reporter: … [continue reading] Against Professional Philosophy -


Secession [Revised entry by Allen Buchanan and Elizabeth Levinson on October 26, 2021. Changes to: Main text, notes.html] Until fairly recently, secession has been a neglected topic among philosophers. Two factors may explain why philosophers have now begun to turn their attention to secession. First, in the past few decades there has been a great increase not only in the number of attempted secessions, but also in successful secessions, and philosophers may simply be reacting to... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Should Pro-Choice Advocates Compromise on Abortion? In a recent New York Times essay, “A Hard but Real Compromise Is Possible on Abortion,” Jon A. Shields suggests that pro-choice advocates should be willing to live with a 15-week limit on access to abortion. He bases his proposal on the fact that, while most Americans say they support Roe v. Wade, most are also in favor of restricting abortion to the first trimester. This is because of a common moral intuition that predisposes... Hastings Bioethics -


Now Featured We are grateful to be able to share out latest symposium this week on James Woodward‘s new book, Causation With A Human Face. We also have fantastic commentators: Josh Knobe, Patricia Cheng, Christopher Hitchcock, Thomas Blanchard, and David Kinney, and Tania Lombrozo. You can read all of the posts here as they become available. The post Now Featured appeared first on The Brains Blog. Brains Blog -


Postcard from Rhodes Ancient Kamiros A week on Rhodes, in stunning October weather, to stay with the Digital Nomad Daughter. Our first time travelling abroad since the pandemic struck. We seem to have survived the covid festival at the airport (we didn’t think our fellow travellers’ mask game was exactly optimal), and fingers crossed for the return. But here seems safer than at home. Of course being with family again is terrific; and Rhodes is a delight in... Logic Matters -


Philosophy Graduate Admissions Spreadsheet 2021-22 Reminder: there’s an open-access spreadsheet all about philosophy graduate program admissions, including relevant links and information about application deadlines, fees, requirements, funding packages, and which departments (if any) have suspended admissions for the next academic year. [Luis Fernando Benedit, “Study for Labyrinth for White Mice”]The document is created and maintained by Linds Whittaker, a graduate student at the University of Washington. You can check it out below or at this link.  Daily Nous -


Oldest Professorship in Philosophy Gets New Name The White’s Chair of Moral Philosophy at University of Oxford was established in 1621 with a donation from clergyman Thomas White. 400 years later, a new donation has resulted in the position, believed to be the oldest university professorship in philosophy, having a new name. Following a £2.8 million (approximately $3.85 million) donation from the Sekyra Foundation, the professorship will now be known as the Sekyra and White’s Professorship of Moral Philosophy. [Luděk Sekyra]The foundation... Daily Nous -


A Network for Scholars Researching Women Philosophers in the History of Philosophy The Center for the History of Women Philosophers and Scientists at Paderborn University is has created a network for scholars who work on women in the history of philosophy. Called “New Voices on Women in the History of Philosophy,” the project “intends to interconnect and further the work of scholars in the field of Women Philosophers in the History of Philosophy.” It is organized by Clara Carus (Paderborn). New Voices hosts talks, and a new... Daily Nous -


Acting with words In my blog last week, I wrote about J.L. Austin’s language theory. John Searle became that much inspired by Austin’s work, and also by the work of P.F. Strawson, that he has developed their ideas into a theory of what he called “speech acts”. Searle elaborated his views in his dissertation, titled “Sense and Reference”, which became the basis of his famous book Speech Acts, published in 1969. This book is full of ideas and... Philosophy by the Way -


My Half-Vaxxed Daughter I got the jab with no hesitation. The risks seemed negligible and the benefits substantial, so when the AstraZeneca vaccine became available to me in March of this year, I lined up for my turn. My 25-year-old daughter, Tara, has undertaken a very different “jab journey.” For several months she simply refused to get vaxxed. I asked her if she was afraid of side effects. No. “Is it long-term safety you’re worried about?” No. “Do... The Philosophical Salon -


Untangling the web David S. Oderberg and others on free speech, in the new anthology Having Your Say: Threats to Free Speech in the 21st Century, edited by J. R. Shackleton. In First Things, William Lane Craig in quest of the historical Adam.  Christianity Today interviews Craig about his new book on the subject. At Rolling Stone, Steely Dan’s Donald Fagen on the release of two live albums and the prospect of a new album.  Fagen is interviewed... Edward Feser -


I’ll be speaking at the Philo of Sci Association (PSA): Philosophy IN Science: Can Philosophers of Science Contribute to Science? . Philosophy in Science: Can Philosophers of Science Contribute to Science?      on November 13, 2-4 pm   This session revolves around the intriguing question: Can Philosophers of Science Contribute to Science? They’re calling it philosophy “in” science–when philosophical ministrations actually intervene in a science itself.  This is the session I’ll be speaking in. I hope you will come to our session if you’re there–it’s hybrid, so you can’t see it through a remote... Error Statistics -


The Monopoly Experiment: Wealthy People Are More Selfish Does having more money make a person more inclined to share their wealth with others and acknowledge their good fortune? No. Research suggests precisely the opposite. One experiment by psychologists at the University of California, Irvine, invited pairs of strangers to play a rigged Monopoly game where a coin flip designated one player rich and one poor. The rich players received twice as much money as their opponent to begin with; as they played the... Reason and Meaning -