Metaphysics

Ethics Review Forum: Thomason’s ‘Naked: The Dark Side of Shame and Moral Life’, reviewed by MacKenzie

¶ Welcome to our Ethics review forum on Krista K. Thomason’s Naked: The Dark Side of Shame and Moral Life (OUP), reviewed by Jordan MacKenzie. ¶ From the book abstract: Moral philosophers have long argued that shame can be a morally valuable emotion that helps people realize when they fail to be the kinds of people they aspire to be. According to these arguments, people feel shame when they fail to live up to the norms, standards, and ideals that are valued as part of a virtuous life. But lurking in the shadows is the dark side of shame. People might feel shame when they fail to live up to their values, but they also feel shame about sex, nudity, being ugly, fat, stupid, or low-class. What is worse, people often respond to shame with violence and self-destruction. This book argues for a unified account of shame that embraces shame’s dark side. Rather than try to explain away the troubling cases as irrational or misguided, it presents an account of shame that makes sense of both its good and bad side. Shame is the experience of a tension between two aspects of one’s self: one’s self-conception and one’s identity. People are liable to feelings of shame because they are not always who they take themselves to be. Shame is a valuable moral emotion, and even though it has a dark side, people would not be better off without it. ¶ From the review: ¶ We feel shame when we fall short of... -

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What Is Learned from 70,000 Responses to Trolley Scenarios?

A team of researchers has reported on its collection and analysis of 70,000 responses to three scenarios that frequently comprise versions of the trolley problem. Appearing in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, “Universals and variations in moral decisions made in 42 countries by 70,000 participants” lays out the results of the massive study that collected the responses, in ten languages, from 42 countries. The study was conducted by Edmond Awad (Exeter, MIT),  Sohan Dsouza (MIT), Azim Shariff (UBC), Iyad Rahwan (MIT, Max Planck Institute), and Jean-François Bonnefon (MIT, Toulouse). The participants were confronted with three hypothetical scenarios in which a trolley will soon roll over and kill five workers unless the participant chooses to intervene and sacrifice the life of one other worker. In “Switch” (aka... -

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Natural deduction for quantifier logic

It’s very late in the day, as I hope to get IFL2 finally off to the Press within the next fortnight or so. But since the natural deduction chapters are new to the second edition it is understandable (I hope!) that I am still worrying away at them, tinkering here... -

Read More @ Logic Matters
Emotion, Reason, and Action in Kant

2020.01.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews ¶ Maria Borges, Emotion, Reason, and Action in Kant, Bloomsbury, 2019, 209pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350078369. ¶ Reviewed by Melissa Merritt, University of New South Wales According to a well-worn caricature, Immanuel Kant took the business of morality... -

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Natural deduction for quantifier logic It’s very late in the day, as I hope to get IFL2 finally off to the Press within the next fortnight or so. But since the natural deduction chapters are new to the second edition it is understandable (I hope!) that I am still worrying away at them, tinkering here and there. Here then is the latest version of the three main chapters on QL proofs. Any last minute corrections and/or helpful comments (other than, perhaps,... Logic Matters -


Ethics Review Forum: Thomason’s ‘Naked: The Dark Side of Shame and Moral Life’, reviewed by MacKenzie Welcome to our Ethics review forum on Krista K. Thomason’s Naked: The Dark Side of Shame and Moral Life (OUP), reviewed by Jordan MacKenzie. From the book abstract: Moral philosophers have long argued that shame can be a morally valuable emotion that helps people realize when they fail to be the kinds of people they aspire to be. According to these arguments, people feel shame when they fail to live up to the norms, standards, and ideals that... PEA Soup -


The Mysterious Reappearance of Consciousness I recently published an article on IAI News criticizing the bizarre notion—called ‘eliminativism’ or ‘illusionism’ in philosophy—that phenomenal consciousness, experience itself, with its felt qualities, doesn’t actually exist. This position is held, among others, by Princeton neuroscientist Michael Graziano, who has published a reply to my essay, to which this article is a response.Let me start by saying that I appreciate Graziano’s willingness to engage; this is the only way that we will slowly inch... IAI.tv -


Adventures in the Old Atheism, Part IV: Marx I have never been remotely attracted to Marxism.  Its economic reductionism, vision of human life as a struggle of antagonistic classes, hostility to the family, and the hermeneutics of suspicion enshrined in its theory of ideology, are all repulsive and inhuman.  Other elements, such as the theory of surplus value and prophecies about the withering away of the state and the idyll of life under communism, are sheer tosh.  These flaws are grave and real... Edward Feser -


Emotion, Reason, and Action in Kant 2020.01.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Maria Borges, Emotion, Reason, and Action in Kant, Bloomsbury, 2019, 209pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350078369. Reviewed by Melissa Merritt, University of New South Wales According to a well-worn caricature, Immanuel Kant took the business of morality to be a matter for the pure rational will, and consequently did not accord much room for emotion in a morally good life. The caricature, of course, does... Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews -


Companion to Wisdom Literature Due to drop in March — featuring of course, Philo of Alexandria. fourth gospelhellenismJewish Identitylogosphilo of alexandriaPlatoseptuagintwisdom literature Man Without Qualities -


The Precarity of Utopia: The Will to Battle by Ada Palmer Ada Palmer's Terra Ignota continues to be a series that is obviously brilliant whether I understand it or not (and I often don't). How could I not love this third book in the series, where the reader is enlisted into a dialogue with Thomas Hobbes in the 25th century?I loved the world building and the historical consciousness introduced in the first book. I enjoyed delving further into the world and deeper thoughts about gender in... Examined Worlds -


THE OLD BOY HAS STILL GOT IT I started today preparing my first lecture on Book I of Hume's Treatise, for videotaping February 5th.  As I was typing the outline of my opening remarks, a lovely idea struck me regarding Hume's relation to Kant.  It was an idea that had not occurred to me in the 67 years since I first formulated my rather original and counter-intuitive story about their philosophical relationship.  So these lectures will not merely be a stroll down... The Philosopher’s Stone -


Brhadaranyaka Upanisad - Upadhi, Adhyasa and the Sage Ashtavakra I’m going to rest on this landing to take a breath before Sankara begins to desconstruct the position he has just sketched about upadhis. Not that they are wrong but merely a closer approximation to an ungraspable truth which eludes the rational mind. The Sage Ashthavakra threw away all epideictic props and resided in natural unwrought enlightenment. Does that mean there are no rules, no method? |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||\An interesting thing about the Asthavakra Gita also known... Ombhurbhuva -


THE TRIAL 1.         Say what you will, we can all agree that Adam Schiff is doing a brilliant job.  He won’t change any minds, as he well knows, but he is a class act, and I for one enjoy watching a virtuoso performance of any sort.2.         There has been some stupid commentary about a grand witness swap, Hunter Biden for John Bolton.  The Republicans have 53 votes and they need 51 to call Hunter Biden as a... The Philosopher’s Stone -


The video on Heidegger and Miyazaki that's circulating is worth the download. Especially if you're a fan of both. And who isn't? Enowning -


laugh of the week My high school-aged nephew in Portland found a web biography that did get my name and birthdate correct. However, it also included this absurdity: “He is one of richest Philosophers born in United States. Estimated net worth: $104 million.” It even lists Forbes as one of the sources verifying my vast wealth! Even better was this follow-up sentence: “He earned his money from being a professional Philosopher.” [ADDENDUM: I just checked $104 million against a... Object Oriented Philosophy -


Lebesgue sums previsions don't always lead to Dutch Books for inconsistent credences Suppose E is the Lebesgue-sum prevision. Namely, if W is a wager on a finite space Ω with a credence (perhaps inconsistent P) and UW is the utility function corresponding to W, then EW = ∑yP({ω : UW(ω)=y}). Suppose your decision procedure for repeated wagers is to accept a wager if and only if the wager’s value is non-negative (independently of whatever other wagers you might have accepted). Suppose, further, that Ω has exactly two points and the credence... Alexander Pruss -


Dimensions of counterfactual thought Felipe De Brigard is Associate Professor in the departments of Philosophy, Psychology and Neuroscience, and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at Duke University. He’s the principal investigator of the Imagination and Modal Cognition lab (www.imclab.org) associated with the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences. His research concerns memory, imagination, and moral cognition, and has been published in philosophical, psychological, and neuroscientific venues. A post by Felipe De Brigard.For the past few years, my lab has been... The Junkyard -


Divine speech acts and classical theism Here is a question I have wondered about and have never heard or seen much discussion of: What does it mean to say that God engaged in some speech act, such as commanding or asserting? The more anthropomorphic one’s theism, the easier the question can be answered, because the closer the analogy between divine speech acts and ours. But the setting that interests me here is classical theism (both because it’s the truth theory of... Alexander Pruss -


Peter Kingsley’s CATAFALQUE (9): Prophetic language and Platonic meta-language Kingsley’s basic terminology is « Platonic » in the stereotypical sense of that term: dualism, absolute reality, our world is one of illusions: https://www.academia.edu/41675454/Review_of_CATAFALQUE « Look at his language » as Kingsley is fond of saying of Jung. Kingsley’s own language is infused with Platonic dualisms. Far from thinking outside Reason’s categories, Peter Kingsley has some very simplistic categories in place, even if he doesn’t give a damn about being « reasonable ». Thus he is blind to the other thinkers... Agent Swarm -


What Is Learned from 70,000 Responses to Trolley Scenarios? A team of researchers has reported on its collection and analysis of 70,000 responses to three scenarios that frequently comprise versions of the trolley problem. Appearing in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, “Universals and variations in moral decisions made in 42 countries by 70,000 participants” lays out the results of the massive study that collected the responses, in ten languages, from 42 countries. The study was conducted by Edmond Awad (Exeter, MIT),  Sohan... Daily Nous -


The role of convention in signification In his Seśvaramīmāṃsā ad 1.1.12, Veṅkaṭanātha explains that the example of proper names does not prove that language in general depends on convention. He writes that the case of proper names is not a dahanadṛṣṭānta, possibly ‘an example which sets on fire [the whole theory]’. Why so? Because प्रकृते यथोपलम्भं स्वभावसहकार्यादिनियमात्* Because in the case at hand (i.e., language, composed of proper names and common words) there is a restrictive rule regarding the role of... The Indian Philosophy Blog -


Ethics Discussion at PEA Soup: Marcello Di Bello and Collin O’Neill’s “Profile Evidence, Fairness, and the Risk of Mistaken Convictions,” with a critical précis by David Wasserman Welcome to what we expect will be a very interesting and productive discussion of Marcello Di Bello and Collin O’Neill’s “Profile Evidence, Fairness, and the Risk of Mistaken Convictions.” The paper is published in the most recent issue of Ethics, and is available here. David Wasserman has kindly agreed to contribute a critical précis, and it appears immediately below. Please join in the discussion!   [David Wasserman herewith:] “Profile Evidence, Fairness, and the Risk of... PEA Soup -


The Philosophy Museum (guest post by Anna Ichino) The following is a guest post by Anna Ichino, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Milan. A version of it first appeared at the blog, Imperfect Cognitions. The Philosophy Museum by Anna Ichino Have you ever visited a Philosophy Museum? I bet not. Apparently, though there have been some philosophy-related museum exhibits and temporary installations, there aren’t any permanent philosophy museums in the world. So my colleagues and I in the Philosophy Department of the University... Daily Nous -