Metaphysics

IFL2: Quotation conventions

A small matter. But an intro logic book needs to have a policy on whether mentioned formulae get enclosed in quotation marks. IFL1 took a sternly conservative line on this, leading to somewhat unsightly rashes of quotation marks. I originally was going to carry this over to IFL2; but I have belatedly decided on a much more relaxed policy, which will be followed in future draft chapters (a policy more in keeping, indeed, with usual mathematical practice, which is a major plus). I was uncomfortable about the amount of quotational clutter in IFL1, and I was spurred on in part by some blunt remarks about not fussing over quotation in §9.1.2 of David Makinson’s Sets, Logic and Maths for Computing. ¶ Having made the decision, I was interested to check back to see what other intro textbooks said about quotation, use and mention. There were some real surprises. For example: My namesake Nick Smith, in his (in many ways excellent) Logic: The Laws of Truth, doesn’t use quotation marks round formulae. Fair enough — but he never discusses this decision: in fact in his long book, he rather oddly doesn’t talk about quotation conventions, use and mention at all. Likewise, Barker-Plummer, Barwise and Etchemendy in Language, Proof and Logic also do not use quotation marks around formulae — and the only sort of quotes they actually mention in the book are scare quotes. Greg Restall’s Logic an Introduction doesn’t use quotes either, and again doesn’t discuss the issue. He perhaps... -

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Assertions, Denials, Questions, Answers, and the Common Ground

Abstract: In this talk, I examine some of the interconnections between norms governing assertion, denial, questions and answers, and the common ground of a discourse. When we pay attention to the structure of norms governing polar (yes/no) questions, we can clarify the distinction between strong and weak denials, together with the parallel distinction between strong and weak assertion, and the way that these speech acts interact with the common ground. ¶ With those connections established, I respond to two criticisms of the program sketched out in my 2005 paper “Multiple Conclusions”. First, that understanding the upshot of a valid sequent X ⊢ Y as enjoining us to not assert each member of X and deny each member of Y is altogether too weak to... -

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The Limit of Responsibility: The Ethical Paradox of the Anthropocene

by Agostino Cera In this post I will try to describe the ethical paradox emerging within the framework of the so-called Anthropocene: the ‘new aspirant ... Read more... -

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Assertions, Denials, Questions, Answers, and the Common Ground

Abstract: In this talk, I examine some of the interconnections between norms governing assertion, denial, questions and answers, and the common ground of a discourse. When we pay attention to the structure of norms governing polar (yes/no) questions, we can clarify the distinction between strong and weak denials, together... -

Read More @ Consequently.org

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IFL2: Quotation conventions A small matter. But an intro logic book needs to have a policy on whether mentioned formulae get enclosed in quotation marks. IFL1 took a sternly conservative line on this, leading to somewhat unsightly rashes of quotation marks. I originally was going to carry this over to IFL2; but I have belatedly decided on a much more relaxed policy, which will be followed in future draft chapters (a policy more in keeping, indeed, with usual... Logic Matters -


On the claim of science. For Heidegger, “each supposition is always already grounded in a certain kind of acceptio. Only when the presence of something is accepted, can one have suppositions about it.” It is in this sense that Heidegger introduces the distinction between perceptible, ontic phenomena and the “imperceptible, that is the existing of something = ontological phenomena” that “always already and necessarily show themselves prior to all perceptible phenomena.” The point itself is... Enowning -


The Limit of Responsibility: The Ethical Paradox of the Anthropocene by Agostino Cera In this post I will try to describe the ethical paradox emerging within the framework of the so-called Anthropocene: the ‘new aspirant ... Read more... Blog of the APA -


Assertions, Denials, Questions, Answers, and the Common Ground Abstract: In this talk, I examine some of the interconnections between norms governing assertion, denial, questions and answers, and the common ground of a discourse. When we pay attention to the structure of norms governing polar (yes/no) questions, we can clarify the distinction between strong and weak denials, together with the parallel distinction between strong and weak assertion, and the way that these speech acts interact with the common ground. With those connections established, I... Consequently.org -


Assertions, Denials, Questions, Answers, and the Common Ground Abstract: In this talk, I examine some of the interconnections between norms governing assertion, denial, questions and answers, and the common ground of a discourse. When we pay attention to the structure of norms governing polar (yes/no) questions, we can clarify the distinction between strong and weak denials, together with the parallel distinction between strong and weak assertion, and the way that these speech acts interact with the common ground. With those connections established, I... Consequently.org -


Assertions, Denials, Questions, Answers, and the Common Ground Abstract: In this talk, I examine some of the interconnections between norms governing assertion, denial, questions and answers, and the common ground of a discourse. When we pay attention to the structure of norms governing polar (yes/no) questions, we can clarify the distinction between strong and weak denials, together with the parallel distinction between strong and weak assertion, and the way that these speech acts interact with the common ground. With those connections established, I... Consequently.org -


Is eternalism compatible with the actualization of potentiality? Every so often, someone claims to me that there is a difficulty in reconciling the Aristotelian idea of the actualization of potential with eternalism, the view that past, present and future are equally real. I am puzzled by this question, because I can’t see the difficulty. On the contrary, there is a tension between presentism, the view that only present things exist, and this Aristotelian thesis: Some present events are the actualization of a no-longer... Alexander Pruss -


4. Common Knowledge and Experience in Social Space We act in an environment in which much is in public view, and you might very well think that perceptual facts that cannot be known in common cannot be known at all. For any account that aims to explain the public character of our perceptual surroundings the notion of common knowledge will be of crucial importance. I have been suggesting that the most basic perceptual common knowledge is of a spatial kind: in order to... Brains Blog -


Taittiriya Upanishad II.i.1 (no.2 in series) The knower of Brahman attains the highest. Here is a verse uttering that very fact: Brahman is truth, knowledge and infinite. He who knows that Brahman existing in the intellect, lodged in the supreme space in the heart, enjoys, as identified with the all-knowing Brahman, all desirable things, simultaneously. When it is said that the knower of Brahman knows the highest, what is it that they know. When the answer is given it is parsed... Ombhurbhuva -


What’s an Analogy Analogous To? Supposing somebody didn’t know what an analogy was?  How could he find out? Could somebody explain it to him by an analogy?  Could somebody say “Look –an analogy bears the same relationship to the thing I am analogizing as does a dream of a river to our waking fear of death, an image in a mirror does to the thing mirrored, tears do the overburdened heart? How could that help?  Because it would seem to... Eric Linus Kaplan -


Houses of philosophers Ray Monk says that Wittgenstein's "last two years were spent living as a guest of his friends and disciples – with Malcolm in Ithaca, von Wright in Cambridge, and Elizabeth Anscombe in Oxford." In case anyone's interested, here's what these places look like.According to this article, Malcolm's address was 1107 Hanshaw Road, and when Wittgenstein stayed there his room was upstairs. It's easy to find pictures online, such as this one:The British Wittgenstein Society says that... Language Goes on Holiday -


Knowledge by Acquaintance vs. Description [Revised entry by Ali Hasan and Richard Fumerton on June 12, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The terminology is most clearly associated with Bertrand Russell, but the distinction between knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge by description is arguably a critical component of classical or traditional versions of foundationalism. Let us say that one has inferential or nonfoundational knowledge that p when one's knowledge that p depends on one's knowledge of some other proposition(s) from... Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy -


Experience-taking and I-states Yuchen Guo is a PhD student in philosophy at Sorbonne University in France. His main research interests are in philosophy of mind, philosophy of psychology and aesthetics, with a particular focus on philosophy of fiction. He is currently working on analyzing the different roles i-states play in our engagement with fiction. A post by Yuchen Guo.Imagine the following case:Paul, a method actor, has been playing the role of Romeo on stage for a long time.... The Junkyard -


Smith on Smith Here is the opening paragraph to Vernon’s Foreward to Propriety and Prosperity. I would urge anyone interested in situated cognition to read his superb Rationality in Economics: Constructivist and Ecological Forms, amazingly an unknown work within situated circles, proponent or critic. Also worth a read is Vernon’s memoir. This book is a welcome addition to the resurgent scholarly… Man Without Qualities -


Nimses, the blockchain with an understanding of being. Human existence (Dasein) is possible as a constant reference to the past, in the present, in order to detect patterns for building the future. “Temporality temporalizes as a future which makes present in the process of having been” B&T. Enowning -


Is It Irrational To Be Rational? Among other things, rationality is the ability to make distinctions, to tell one thing from another, to know that x is not y. But, if rationality is categorical, sometimes it feels as though categories may be a category error. Faced by the perfectly rational idea that one knows the difference between “successful” and “unsuccessful” enterprises, Anton Chekhov once wrote to a friend: “Are you successful or aren’t you? What about me? What about Napoleon? One... IAI.tv -


Instagramming the Self By Zacaria Manning If you scroll through the average Instagram user’s account, you will undoubtedly see an endless parade of photographs featuring fancy drinks, delectable ... Read more... Blog of the APA -


Hypothesis: There Is Only One Graviton What do I know, I just read Nature Physics and quantum theory textbooks, but I so don't have a physics degree (unlike my grandfather).But here's an idea. And it does have the merit of extreme simplicity and not needing to invent shit we can't observe because they're too tiny or multidimensional.We can't find gravitons or make them work, not because of anything mysterious about dimensions, but because there's only one graviton. The singularity like "point"... Ecology Without Nature -


3. Demonstration and Communication “One cannot not communicate”: this slightly unsettling axiom of Watzlawick’s (1967) is necessarily true of creatures operating in social space. The social spatial framework is not simply given to but achieved by us through activities in which demonstrative gestures play a vital role. We point, nudge, and direct others’ gaze towards third objects in ways that do not always require the use of language: jointly attending to objects is something pre-verbal children and (on some views)... Brains Blog -


How Would Freud Explain Populism? One of the explanations for the rise of populist nationalist myths today goes back to the complicated dynamics between the individual and society, and between reason and fantasy. The thinker who might help us understand our current political storms is no other than Sigmund Freud.Freud is best known for his more controversial theories on sexuality. But we need not buy Freudian mechanics or his clinical theories. Enough of value remains without Oedipus.Freudian theory explores the... IAI.tv -